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  1. NRG
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       #1  
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    Source: MSNBC

    Tour de France winner tests positive for drugs
    Landis had an unusual level of testosterone/epitestosterone after stage 17

    Tour de France winner Floyd Landis has tested positive for the male sex hormone testosterone, his team American Phonak said on Thursday.

    “The Phonak Cycling Team was notified yesterday by the UCI of an unusual level of testosterone/epitestosterone ratio in the test made on Floyd Landis after stage 17 of the Tour de France,” Phonak said in a team statement.

    Landis, who raced with a hip injury throughout the event, was reportedly in Germany to receive treatment on his hip when the report broke.
    -snip-
  2. #2  
    Sad if true... Sport is tarnished once again.

    It was bad enough trying to justify Lance's wins in the face of such allegations.

    I wonder what is meant by an "unusual level of testosterone"?
    I would think that most male atheletes would have more testasterone than couch-potato , inactive types. I hope this isn't another attempt to not let the American's get credit for winning the "Tour De Farce"...
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  3. NRG
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       #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by duanedude1
    I hope this isn't another attempt to not let the American's get credit for winning the "Tour De Farce"...
    Sadly, I thought this may be it, too. We will just have to wait and see.
  4. #4  
    Given the fact that he's not showing at agreed upon appearances, I'm worried this may be true.
  5. TomUps's Avatar
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    #5  
    Someone has to explain to me why athletes take these drugs when they know they are going to be tested.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Given the fact that he's not showing at agreed upon appearances, I'm worried this may be true.
    not necessarily - the team is doing the right thing in suspending him until the next test is completed (and it is a requirement under the rules). High levels of testosterone is and has been a problem to effectively test for in the past. I do not know of a cycling star that has been kicked out for high testosterone levels - it can usually be contradicted. What I find interesting is that he tested high for just that one day. He was in yellow on other stages (just the day before) as well as on Sunday and those tests were ok. Testosterone just does not pop up to high levels over night and then go away. I think he'll clear it on the next test.

    However, this is just more **** that pro cycling does not need.
    It's not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change” - Darwin
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by bubbatex
    not necessarily - the team is doing the right thing in suspending him until the next test is completed (and it is a requirement under the rules).
    Ok, then this bit confuses me:

    Landis had already withdrawn from two races in Europe this week, Wednesday's Acht van Chaam street race in the Netherlands and Thursday's Jyske Bank Grand Prix in Denmark.

    "Today, Phonak confirmed the cancellation. They could not say anything about why Landis has disappeared," said Jyske Bank Grand Prix spokesman Nils Finderup.

    "We have tried to call him, to call his agent, and to call the head of the Phonak team, but no one has answered."

    Organisers of the Acht van Chaam event were also angry at Landis' no-show.

    "We have tried to contact Floyd and his manager but we have not been able to," said race agent John van den Akker.

    "We are very annoyed. We have invested a lot of money to ensure his appearance and we would have expected some kind of explanation."
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Given the fact that he's not showing at agreed upon appearances, I'm worried this may be true.
    Due to the challenges with enhancing drug abuse over the last several years, teams are taking control and taking steps to help ensure self moderating to help prevent official "laws" or governing orgs to take control....which takes control away from them.

    The Basso, Jan, etc... were not kicked out to Tour de France because they were ordered....it was because their team leaders made them. The sport is trying to clean itself. It is good so see responsible actions in situations like this.

    The coach said they are taking this step until confirmation. If confirmed, he will be fired from the team. The Tour directors will make a decision about his standing this year.

    But it is VERY important to note that this type of positive can be misleading and is very subject to confirmation with the backup sample.
    Last edited by HobbesIsReal; 07/27/2006 at 12:04 PM.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Ok, then this bit confuses me:
    Could be legal advice not to say anything during the confirmation process not to talk during public appearances. Who knows. I think we will find out a lot more in the next couple days.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas
    Ok, then this bit confuses me:

    Landis had already withdrawn from two races in Europe this week, Wednesday's Acht van Chaam street race in the Netherlands and Thursday's Jyske Bank Grand Prix in Denmark.

    "Today, Phonak confirmed the cancellation. They could not say anything about why Landis has disappeared," said Jyske Bank Grand Prix spokesman Nils Finderup.

    "We have tried to call him, to call his agent, and to call the head of the Phonak team, but no one has answered."

    Organisers of the Acht van Chaam event were also angry at Landis' no-show.

    "We have tried to contact Floyd and his manager but we have not been able to," said race agent John van den Akker.

    "We are very annoyed. We have invested a lot of money to ensure his appearance and we would have expected some kind of explanation."
    That is just a factor of what I will call damage control. They pulled out of races on Wednesday and today as soon as they found out, then it took them about 18 hours to get their game plan in place.
    It's not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change” - Darwin
  11. #11  
    A some more details about the situation as Landis speaks out:

    Landis denies cheating after positive Tour de France test revealed



    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/cycli...t_x.htm?csp=15

    In an interview with SI.com, Landis repeatedly denied cheating and said that an elevated level of testosterone is different from a failed test.

    The test result was on one half of Landis' original sample, called the A Sample. For an athlete to be considered guilty of a doping offense, both the A and B Samples must test positive.

    --------------------

    Testing for testosterone

    Landis' A sample came back with high levels of testosterone. Testosterone is included as an anabolic steroid on the list of substances banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, and its use can be punished by a two-year ban.

    The difficulty with testing for testosterone is that it is a naturally occurring hormone, present in everyone's body. Drug testers use a ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone in tests as a screening measure...............

    .................Drug testers also have a carbon isotope test that can detect the difference between naturally ocurring testostorone and synthetic testosterone used in injections.

    -------------------

    Waiting for the results

    The 30-year-old Landis knew he had challenging days ahead. He is set to have hip replacement surgery for a condition called avascular necrosis, or bone death, that resulted from a training crash in 2003. Still unanswered are questions about whether anything he could have been taking for pain could have caused a false positive in his test after the 17th stage.

    Jonathan Vaughters, a former Tour rider with Armstrong's U.S. Postal Service team, says the epitestosterone test is one of the most unreliable and is "almost always thrown out in favor of the athlete by CAS (the Court of Arbitration in Sport, the Supreme Court of sports litigation)."

    "His use of cortisone for his hip injury and drinking beer the night before the stage are things that could trigger a epitestosterone positive," says Vaughters. "It's a shame that Floyd may get railroaded on this thing because people are tired of hearing all the pseudo-scientific excuses some riders have been putting out and just want to nail someone. He doesn't deserve this."
    Basically, It is still in the wait and see stage.......
  12. #12  
    here's another interesting tidbit from an interview with SI:

    "But even if the B sample confirms the A result, Landis is not necessarily guilty of taking an illegal performance enhancing drug to boost his testosterone. Some riders can prove that they have an elevated Testosterone/Epitestosterone (T:E) level, if they undergo an endocrine test performed by a credible doctor. Landis said he will use Spanish doctor Luis Hernández, who has helped other riders prove a high T:E count. "In hundreds of cases, no one's ever lost one," Landis told SI."
    It's not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change” - Darwin
  13. Micael's Avatar
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    #13  
    What is being described as a 'boost' may actually be caused by a lowering of epitestorerone. What bothers me is that even if he *is* found to be clean, the win is tarnished.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  14. #14  
    Landis' 'B' Sample Returns Positive
    August 05, 2006

    Floyd Landis' backup doping sample tested positive Saturday, increasing the prospect of the American cyclist being stripped of his Tour de France victory.

    The International Cycling Union (UCI) said Landis' "B" sample confirmed the initial "adverse analytical finding" for higher-than-allowable levels of testosterone.

    Landis was immediately fired by his Swiss-based team, Phonak, and the Tour de France director said the 30-year-old rider was no longer considered the race champion. Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme said Landis was no longer considered champion, but the decision to strip him of his title rests with the UCI.

    If found guilty, Landis also faces a two-year ban from the sport. He continued to deny any wrongdoing and vowed to clear his name.

    ---------------

    Landis' confirmed test sets off what could now be months of appeals and arguments by the American, who claims the positive finding was due to naturally high testosterone levels. He has repeatedly declared his innocence and vowed to fight the allegations, and did so again Saturday.

    "I will fight these charges with the same determination and intensity that I bring to my training and racing," he said. "It is now my goal to clear my name and restore what I worked so hard to achieve."

    FULL STORY: http://www.topix.net/content/cbs/089...N1MUNNUNF48GU9
  15. #15  
    Landis: I Earned Tour De France Title
    Cyclist Tells CBS News He'll Do Whatever It Takes To Fight Doping Charges
    NEW YORK, Aug. 7, 2006

    (CBS/AP) American cyclist Floyd Landis says his remarkable comeback in an Alpine stage of the Tour de France is legitimate, and that he never used testosterone patches of any kind on his body.

    Landis was fired by his team and the Tour de France no longer considered him its champion Saturday after his second doping sample tested positive for higher-than-allowable levels of testosterone.

    The samples contained synthetic testosterone, indicating that it came from an outside source.

    "Ordinarily, after a stage, I don't do any kind of intravenous anything. That day, I was extremely dehydrated. Doctors thought, OK, give him saline solution with a little bit of glucose in it. Other than that, no, nothing,"

    ----------------------

    Dr. John Sonzogni, a sports medicine specialist and former medical director for the World Cup told The Early Show there's "certainly" a chance the test was tampered with. "Anything's possible. We don't have the whole story yet. Tampering is a potential problem, the lab error is a potential issue, contamination, whether it be purposeful or nonpurposeful," Dr. Sonzogni said.

    FULL STORY & VIDEO INTERVIEW: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/...n1869573.shtml
  16. #16  
    Good source for collected and updated news about this:

    http://www.topix.net/cycling/floyd-landis
  17. #17  
    Well, sadly it's looking bad for Landis with a second test confirming AND showing synthetic steroids.

  18. #18  
    I don't see how a test can mistake a synthetic. What excuses can he have for that?
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  19. #19  
    Yeah, he is pretty much screwed. I would like to see the samples sent to two different labs though. I know they keep seperate samples at the same facility but by having 2 different independent labs, the prospect that a sample was tampered with would be reduced.
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  20. NRG
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       #20  
    Doesn't the team have their own samples?
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