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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenCode
    Oooh, another Linux user. It's hard to find people who actually USE Linux. Half the people I know who use Linux have never compiled a custom kernel, built drivers which did not already come with the distro, and need everything done for them automatically... I don't understand what the point of using Linux is if you don't hack around it a little, that's why it (and almost all of the software for it) is open-source. I'm developing a script which allows laptop users to configure a network interface at boot instead of having to preconfigure one. I'm close to implementing DUN, but I don't how I'm supposed to modify config files. So I think I may just wind up making a copy of the original and using redirector symbols to create an entirely new file. Do you have any suggestions?
    There is no Linux distro I've seen yet that is ready for Harry Homeowner and until such time it will remain just an enthusiast's OS.
  2. #22  
    So make your own

    It's not uncommon for users to make their own distros.


  3. #23  
    Man, I dunno guys...I've been using firefox and I have absolutely NO problems. I even run adaware and spysweeper and all that crap and they detect no spyware or malicious programs. Are you using IE, Hobbes?

    edit: back when I used linux i remember Mandrake to be pretty solid right out of the install. It's a great OS, I had to hack around to get my Matrox vid card and TV tuner to work with it, but it just became more of a hassle and distraction. Fun times though...
  4.    #24  
    Sadly, due to remotely accessing backend access with work, I am limited to using only IE.
  5.    #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb
    For safe web browsing on a PC, check out Green Border:

    http://www.greenborder.com/

    Highly recommended by Walt Mossberg, too, for those who put stock in his opinions. It only support IE now, but they say they're working on Firefox support.
    I just installed it....thanks for the link.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by theBlaze74
    Until enough of you switch to Macs to make writing MAC spyware worthwile.
    The guy who penetrates mac will be a God in the hacker community. The numbers argument doesn't hold water. Hackers work for pride not money.....you don't get much to crow about exclaiming "Hey I just beat a Ford Taurus in a race". The guy who can say "Hey, I just left a Ferrari in the dust" has something to crow about. It's simply the way Windows is constructed that makes it so easy to hack.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenCode
    So make your own

    It's not uncommon for users to make their own distros.
    I don't think you understand the concept of "Harry Homeowner". It basically means working out of the box. Insert OS disk and onstalls self and all peripherals work.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    It's simply the way Windows is constructed that makes it so easy to hack.
    With all due respect, your idea seems a bit over-simplistic and unsupported.
  9. #29  
    I suppose we'll have to agree to disagree then. I don't see how it would require any more effort for someone to learn to use Linux than it would for that same person to use Windows. It's not like Linux is more difficult or even different to understand than all of the functions in Windows. To the best of my knowledge, the "Harry Homeowner" you are describing doesn't have a monitor which requires custom modelines or devices so out of the ordinary that they require compiling modules which are not already packaged with a distro.


  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenCode
    I suppose we'll have to agree to disagree then. I don't see how it would require any more effort for someone to learn to use Linux than it would for that same person to use Windows. It's not like Linux is more difficult or even different to understand than all of the functions in Windows. To the best of my knowledge, the "Harry Homeowner" you are describing doesn't have a monitor which requires custom modelines or devices so out of the ordinary that they require compiling modules which are not already packaged with a distro.
    Actually, there are far fewer drivers for things as simple as nic cards in Linux than Windose.
  11.    #31  
    Here is a tiny spot of good news:

    Google Declares War On Badware
    New Feature Will Issue Warning When Users Click On Risky Websites

    Google is phasing in a new feature in which it will issue this warning to people who try to click on links to sites with spyware and other malicious code: "The site you are about to visit may harm your computer!"

    Users can search again, learn more about malicious code at the site StopBadware.org or proceed to the suspect site anyhow - at their own risk, of course.

    ----------------------

    Google is phasing in a new feature in which it will issue this warning to people who try to click on links to sites with spyware and other malicious code: "The site you are about to visit may harm your computer!"

    Users can search again, learn more about malicious code at the site StopBadware.org or proceed to the suspect site anyhow - at their own risk, of course.

    FULL STORY: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/...n1880731.shtml
    It is a very small start.....but hopefully will grow in a very short order. I could name at least 20 sites off of memory that I know that has spyware!
    Last edited by HobbesIsReal; 08/10/2006 at 10:20 AM.
  12.    #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by HobbesIsReal
    I just installed it....thanks for the link.
    And it is worth noting that you can request a free Serial number from the company that will enable it free for the first year!
  13. truoc444's Avatar
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    #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenCode
    I'm developing a script which allows laptop users to configure a network interface at boot instead of having to preconfigure one. I'm close to implementing DUN, but I don't how I'm supposed to modify config files. So I think I may just wind up making a copy of the original and using redirector symbols to create an entirely new file. Do you have any suggestions?
    sorry i am still fairly new with linux. i can only recompile enough to get my proprietary drivers (wifi, video) installed to the kernel and working. my programming knowledge stopped at Turbo PASCAL 7 in high school.

    back on topic. i'm also limited to windows on my work pc, and just running firefox has significantly dropped the amount of spyware i get hit with. as part of my job i'm on the net constantly and rarely end up with it.
    "Never Put off until tomorrow
    what you can do the day after tomorrow"
    --Mark Twain

    PalmIII => Sony Clie' => Dell Axim X30 => Treo 650 and loving it
  14.    #34  
    Here is a new threat that is REALLY SCARY....if you don't take the 15 seconds needed to protect yourself.

    I PERSONALLY RECOMEND EVERYONE READ THIS ONE!
    Or at least the few parts I have in red and black bold

    New Pharming Attack Targets Your Router
    02.15.07

    This one's scary. A new type of pharming attack uses a compromised Web page and a little bit of Java script to reach into your wireless router and reprogram its DNS. That lets the malware change the address for your bank, say CitiBank.com, from the real site to one that looks exactly like it-but is designed to steal your identity. I thought I was safe, because my router's protected by Mac Address filtering, but this attack could have wiped me out! Find out how it works and how to protect yourself from this nasty new pharming attack.

    ----------------------------

    The attack is based on pharming, which, like phishing, is a way bad guys trick you into visiting fake web sites. Where phishing fools you-the-user, pharming fools your computer. It does this by compromising your system's access to the DNS (Domain Name Server) system. When you type www.mybank.com, DNS translates that into the correct IP address.

    But if you've been pharmed, it'll translate to the fake site's IP address, and you won't know the difference. One simple pharming attack involves tweaking the computer's HOSTS file, which overrides server-based DNS. That's not such a biggie, because your security software protects the HOSTS file. A bad guy with physical access to your home network might change the DNS settings in the router, directing DNS requests to a black-hat server. But get real - do you let bad guys come in and use your network?

    So what's the new problem? Professor Markus Jakobsson of Indiana University has done a lot of research on router vulnerabilities. Jeremiah Grossman of WhiteHat Security gave a talk at the Black Hat conference last year on Javascript malware. Zulfikar Ramzan of Symantec Security Response put the two pieces together... and realized that it's possible for Javascript on a web site to modify your router's DNS settings.

    THIS IS ALARMING! Symantec is calling this type of attack "drive-by pharming". Just by visiting a site you could be letting hackers take control of just what site you reach when you type www.mybank.com. You wouldn't necessarily notice anything wrong, and there's nothing left behind for a security program to find.

    Just when I was starting to hyperventilate, Ramzan cranked down the scare factor a bit. There is no evidence that this technique is currently in use. On the other hand, proof-of-concept scripts show it's 100% possible. I asked whether Symantec would be updating its security products to block this attack. Surprisingly, Ramzan said that may not be necessary.

    In order to attack your system, the malicious script needs the username and password that control access to the router's configuration. Way too many people leave these set to the default values, which are readily available at web sites like Default Router Passwords Database. By simply switching to a strong password (on your router) you derail this attack. Whew!

    How? Just enter the router's IP address (often 192.168.1.1, but check the docs) in the browser's address bar and log in with the current username and password. Don't know it? Then that database web site will be handy! Set a new, strong password for the router, and store a copy of the password in a safe place. You'll feel much safer, and you didn't spend a cent.

    SOURCE: http://www.appscout.com/2007/02/chan..._no_1.php#more
    Last edited by HobbesIsReal; 02/16/2007 at 09:58 AM.
  15. NRG
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    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by HobbesIsReal View Post
    Here is a new threat that is REALLY SCARY.

    I PERSONALLY RECOMEND EVERYONE READ THIS ONE!

    New Pharming Attack Targets Your Router
    02.15.07
    Evening Hobbes. Thanks for the info.
  16. PSB22's Avatar
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    #36  
    Hobbes... just a bit of an issue regarding "unsubscribe"...

    It's pretty well known that most enterprises send out spam, knowing 99.9% of people will delete it. What do you give to a spam-sender when you "unsubscribe" from a mailing list? You give them a confirmation that there's a live person at the other end of that e-mail address!

    What's more useful to a company - a list of e-mail addresses, or a list of LIVE e-mail addresses?

    I have found that simply "unsubscribing" from mailing lists is a guaranteed way to get more spam. Simply ignore it, turn up the spam filters on your e-mail, and it will eventually go away once they realize no-one is responding from that address.
  17.    #37  
    Yup....that is basically what I do as well. I use the Norton SPAM filter and seems to work pretty good. There are a lot of options for this from ISP built in filters to several 3rd party options, to using Outlook's basic filters.
  18.    #38  
    Here is a new one:

    Don't activate your copy of Windows yet - read this first
    By Mauricio Freitas, posted: 5-MAY-2007 11:45

    Scammers all over are making it harder for common people to identify social engineering tricks... Look at the latest phishing scam associated with a trojan for Windows... According to the Symantec Security Response Weblog:

    Recently we came across an interesting Trojan sample, detected by Symantec as Trojan.Kardphisher. The Trojan is not very technical - it's really just another classic social-engineering attack. What makes it interesting is that the author has obviously taken great pains to make it appear legitimate.

    How legitimate? Look at the screenshot:


    The trojan runs on startup and pretend to be a Windows Activation dialog. Note how it asks for name, address, credit card number, expiry date and even ATM PIN!

    So, beware. Windows Activation does not ask for this information. Also it offers the option to activate over the phone. If you are in doubt and the machine has been activated before, run an anti-virus!

    http://www.geekzone.co.nz/freitasm/2840
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