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  1.    #1  
    I recently learned of this study: Bible Literacy Report II

    Here are the opening paragraphs to the Executive Summary:
    What do today’s college students need to know about the Bible to participate fully and equally in the courses taught in America’s elite colleges and universities?

    This study surveyed 39 English professors at 34 top U.S. colleges and universities to learn their assessment of how important Bible literacy is to college-level study of English and American literature. What do incoming freshmen in college-level English courses need to know about the Bible?

    Almost without exception, English professors we surveyed at major American colleges and universities see knowledge of the Bible as a deeply important part of a good education. The virtual unanimity and depth of their responses on this question are striking. The Bible is not only a sacred scripture to millions of Americans, it is also arguably (as one Northwestern professor stated), the “most influential text in all of Western culture.”

    For example, when asked to respond to the question, “Regardless of a person’s faith, an educated person needs to know about the Bible,” no professor disagreed; nine provided additional explanation. When asked, “Some scholars say Western literature is steeped in references to the Bible. How would you respond to that?” 38 of 39 English professors agreed; 24 strongly. When asked, “In your opinion, how important is it for students who take your courses to be familiar with the Bible?” 38 of 39 professors said it was important.

    Overwhelmingly, professors in this survey indicated that a lack of basic Bible literacy hampers students’ ability to understand both classics and contemporary work. Arduously “decoding” scripture references detracts from absorbing and responding to great works of art, both ancient and modern.

    At the same time, a number of professors expressed discomfort or reservations with appearing to “take sides” in favor of the Bible in the contemporary context. they did not wish to associate themselves with a political movement around the Bible, or to seem to detract from the importance of other aspects of a good education, including the value of becoming knowledgeable about other world religions.
    The linked summary includes a listing of the respondents.

    The full report is available as a .pdf

    Reminds that while the Bible is often used as a sword (or hammer), it was and is still effective as a "pen."
  2. NRG
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    #2  
    It should be offered as an an elective.

    Should the Koran Be Included In High School Literature Curriculum?
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    It should be offered as an an elective.

    Should the Koran Be Included In High School Literature Curriculum?
    The Koran doesn't not hold the same significance to western literature overall as the Bible. However in terms of its use within one of the world's religions, it is of similar value to the Bible and other texts in terms of understanding those religions.
  4. NRG
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    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim
    The Koran doesn't not hold the same significance to western literature overall as the Bible. However in terms of its use within one of the world's religions, it is of similar value to the Bible and other texts in terms of understanding those religions.
    Doesn't matter, maybe if it was a private school, but w/ public schools, we are going to back into the discussion of "seperation of church and state".
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    It should be offered as an an elective.

    Should the Koran Be Included In High School Literature Curriculum?
    I agree, the bible is an important book but it should not be forced on people.

    And if used books the koran should be covered too as they are just as influential in modern life.
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  6. #6  
    In which section, "Fantasy/Science Fiction"?
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  7. #7  
    For western societies, the Bible is one of the most important literary piece to be familiar with. It is referenced everywhere from politics to music. A general knowledge of its contents should be required for college bound curriculums. Just like books such as Tom Saywer and 1984.
  8. #8  
    I like this version
    http://www.thebricktestament.com/
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  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by jlsheldon
    For western societies, the Bible is one of the most important literary piece to be familiar with. It is referenced everywhere from politics to music. A general knowledge of its contents should be required for college bound curriculums. Just like books such as Tom Saywer and 1984.
    This sentiment is shared by most of the respondents to the survey.
  10. #10  
    Reminds that while the Bible is often used as a sword (or hammer), it was and is still effective as a "pen."[/QUOTE]
    to stab in your eye?
  11. NRG
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by jsheldon
    For western societies, the Bible is one of the most important literary piece to be familiar with. It is referenced everywhere from politics to music. A general knowledge of its contents should be required for college bound curriculums. Just like books such as Tom Sawyer and 1984.
    I've gotten by fine without the thing in my life. Just walk the path of Jesus and everything will be alright. If I do not understand a bible reference in a literary work, I will go look it up. But I most certainly do not need to be taught in a class about the bible. What is next dictionary class?
    Last edited by NRG; 06/09/2006 at 09:52 AM.
  12. NRG
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by byronchurch
    Reminds that while the Bible is often used as a sword (or hammer), it was and is still effective as a "pen."
    to stab in your eye?
    Or to bound you to a stake.
  13. #13  
    It seems to me to be more important to find a way to tame the more militant Religions some kind of zealot governor . I have never had a problem finding religious literature when i needed it . Its the (loud) religions that keep one from true religious freedom.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    If I do not understand a bible reference in a literary work, I will go look it up. But I most certainly do not need to be taught in a class about the bible. What is next dictionary class?
    I have to agree. The bible is referenced a lot, but if you don't have the understanding you need, go get it.

    Religion is a big part of how the world works. Schools shouldn't ignore that fact. I would be in favor of a course that covered most of the major religions. But I wouldn't not be in favor of a class that only covered a christian perspective.

    Out of curiosity I would love to see a study showing the success rate of christian students compared to non-christian. Has anyone read the full report? Does it have grade and success information?
  15. #15  
    ToolKit: Where did that guy get all those Legos? Did he make their accessories and paint their expressions on their faces? Really interesting work & looks time consuming.

    NRG: How can you walk the path of Jesus if you know nothing about him? Thus the need to understand some basic aspects of the Bible to function in (our) society.

    In olden days, such knowledge was assumed. As we have become more secular over the years, that assumption is invalid- thus a need for education (since the biblical references still are in our society). Maybe when the Bible is so trivialized that it is never referenced secularly, then there will be no secular need. We are not quite there yet, thank God!

    I wonder if, in a secularized arab (is there such a thing?) society, they would have to teach the Koran from a secular viewpoint, just so kids growing up in non-believing households can understand the culture.

    I would say any society should teach it's youth important documents and traditions that helped make that society possible.
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  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by duanedude1
    ToolKit: Where did that guy get all those Legos? Did he make their accessories and paint their expressions on their faces? Really interesting work & looks time consuming.
    "6. Are the scenes in The Brick Testament created entirely out of LEGO?

    Everything but the background sky is built out of LEGO brand building blocks. Although by far the vast majority of what you see are just combinations of unaltered LEGO elements, there are a few instances where, as a last resort, Rev. Smith has modified LEGO elements with a hobby knife or permanent ink marker. Further, there also are a few select instances of computer graphics used to enhance certain photos (besides the ubiquitous use of speech balloons).
    "

    http://www.thebricktestament.com/faq/index.html
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  17.    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by gaffa
    I have to agree. The bible is referenced a lot, but if you don't have the understanding you need, go get it.

    Religion is a big part of how the world works. Schools shouldn't ignore that fact. I would be in favor of a course that covered most of the major religions. But I wouldn't not be in favor of a class that only covered a christian perspective.

    Out of curiosity I would love to see a study showing the success rate of christian students compared to non-christian. Has anyone read the full report? Does it have grade and success information?
    The study does not appear to address student performance, but rather literary/english professors' opinions.

    One of the inquiries covers the increased ease or difficulty the level of Bible familiarity contributes literature study. In general, the responses concur that there are frequent references, and that there is a relative "ease" associated with increased Bible knowledge. namely, that one need not make the additional step of researching the references. One respondent used the term "mechanical" indescribing the interpretive process that results when one does not have the familiarity.
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    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    I've gotten by fine without the thing in my life. Just walk the path of Jesus and everything will be alright. If I do not understand a bible reference in a literary work, I will go look it up. But I most certainly do not need to be taught in a class about the bible. What is next dictionary class?
    I believe that most school systems (in the US anyway) do teach students how to utilize the dicitionary.
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  19. #19  
    I don't support teaching religon in schools. I support teaching the Bible as a literary work. I had a class just like that. It was part of my 11th grade English Honors curriculum in a public school in CA. This was 1988, and there was no outcry then. I believe that an educated person needs to understand the content of this literary piece. I don't see the harm. I don't think censorship of a piece of this significance is fair to the students. Censorship is bad, from either side.
  20. NRG
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    #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    I believe that most school systems (in the US anyway) do teach students how to utilize the dicitionary.
    LOL. You d*ck . I meant a full class dedicated to the dictionary.
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