Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1.    #1  
    http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05...mbodia_3g_ban/

    Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen has responded to a complaint from his wife that she'd received pornography on her 3G mobile in a manner befitting his Khmer Rouge past - by banning the technology altogether
  2. #3  

    A place where dirty US cab drivers can buy Children for their sick *** sexual vacations. Way to concentrate on the real problems.
  3. #4  
    has there ever been a story more widely covered and yet so completely not about how its been described ... ??

    Cambodia is an other worldly place on many many levels --

    sickening poverty, reigned over by an ineffectual corrupt elite --

    3G and porn has about connection to reality in Cambodia as does controling the sex trade or bringing to genuine justice the perpetrators of the Khemer Rouge atrocities. These are ideas that naive westerners are given to chatting about in backpacker guest houses.

    Outside fancy Phnom Penh bars 7 year old kids plead to sell you cheap pirated Lonely Planet paperbacks, while cynical old expats sip mai tais and remind you that things haven't been this peaceful or prosperous in almost 40 years ...
    Last edited by BARYE; 05/27/2006 at 12:40 PM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  4. #5  
    <merged>
  5. #6  
    What would Cambodian porn be like
    Well behaved women rarely make history
  6. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by RICHINMJ
    A place where dirty US cab drivers can buy Children for their sick *** sexual vacations. Way to concentrate on the real problems.
    Dirty predatory American cab drivers?
  7. #8  
    Here's a wierd story. This guy's whipped.

    http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/ptech/0...eut/index.html

    Cambodian PM bans 3G phones
    Friday, May 26, 2006; Posted: 9:46 a.m. EDT (13:46 GMT)

    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (Reuters) -- Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen has banned 3G mobile phones after a complaint from his wife and her friends about receiving pornography on them.

    "I have written to the Minister of Telecommunications to delay the use of certain mobile phones," Hun Sen told an assembly of Buddhist monks in Phnom Penh on Friday.

    "We can wait 10 more years until we have managed to improve morality in society."

    Hun Sen, a one-eyed former Khmer Rouge soldier who has been in charge for the past 20 years, said his wife had signed a petition asking him to act against the phones, which can send video as well as still images.

    Sexual violence and abuse are common in the war-scarred Southeast Asian nation.

    Cambodia's first 3G (third-generation) mobile network opened earlier this year, but few people can afford the phones.
  8. #9  
    Man am I late to the game. This article has already been posted here. I'm lame lame lame.
  9. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by tcc
    Man am I late to the game. This article has already been posted here. I'm lame lame lame.
    <merged>
    Don't worry, if it is any complement, daThomas did it too.
  10. #11  
    I always imagined that it was a well understood fact of life
    that porn, spam, virus and pirated software kept the whole
    connectivity thing up and working and financially lucrative.

    No porn = no money

    - mvk
    Game over!
  11. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by ronbo2000
    <merged>
    Don't worry, if it is any complement, daThomas did it too.
    Hey!

    I got distracted in the middle of posting that! They're not that far apart!

    Whah! Where's my Midol?



  12. #13  
    (I’ve been threatening for a while to write a little about my travels in asia -- but nothing I had to say really deserved its own thread. Perhaps I can write a few random miscellaneous things here...)

    Unexpectedly, I loved Cambodia. Most every westerner I’d meet felt the same. Especially outside Phnom Penh the people were amazingly generous and kind -- still unspoiled by the corrosive familiarity with rich rude westerners.

    Though I had lots of wonderful times in Cambodia, the most intense memory for me happened as we were leaving and about to board a ferry for Viet Nam.

    We’d taken the bus to the Cambodian/ Vietnam border, where there was an hour or so scheduled “rest stop” for visa/passport control.

    No more than a 100ft from the very tasty informal food stalls and restaurant at the border was this big modern, newly constructed Casino -- something that could easily have been seen at an Indian reservation or Atlantic City, and like nothing I’d seen anywhere else in Cambodia. Mercedes and BMWs occupied the parking spaces, and the Cambodian police who you seldom saw normally, were everywhere in fancy uniforms, driving Mercedes or brand new Japanese SUVs.

    After feasting on the many exotic delicacies that the stall ladies persuaded me to try, we headed back to the bus to await the ferry across the Mekong.

    Kids came aggressively towards us rich westerners to beg -- something that had become so routine that it was usually ignored. But since most would not be coming back through Cambodia, it was the perfect chance to give up any left over Cambodian currency (which wasn’t much -- since Cambodians are happy to transact nearly all business in Dollars or Thai Baht)

    Just then I noticed that among the pleading kids was a girl of perhaps ten -- blind in one eye -- and missing both arms from a only a few inches below her shoulders.

    (Incredibly painful recalling that image.)

    I couldn’t look at her. She was someone so completely helpless -- so entirely unable to control her world.

    I can’t imagine what horror had befallen her -- discovering or playing with a mine perhaps, but that seems unlikely. (an explosion powerful enough to have taken her arms and eye would probably have killed her. There are probably millions of still lethal mines around Cambodia left haphazardly by the Khmer Rouge, especially in the border regions near Vietnam and Thailand. Tourist areas have been made safe, but kids and farmers continue to be maimed.)

    Even the money tucked under her arm stumps would surely be taken from her by her gang leader as soon as we left. She persevered. I can’t imagine what her fate will be as she ages and becomes less sympathetic, will her gang abandon her ? Does she have a family ?? Will the country take care of her ??

    It would be easy to use those images of her helplessness as a metaphor for the fate of the third world, the fate of Cambodia -- but I won’t compromise that girl with that.

    Cambodia was a terrific place -- its people surely deserve better than the fate they’ve been given...
    Last edited by BARYE; 05/28/2006 at 10:23 PM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  13. #14  
    Cambodia is not known for much in the minds of the world’s tourists. The exception, the huge magnificent beautiful exception, is Angkor Wat.

    Considered one of the ten most important of the world’s cultural heritage sites, it is the one part of Cambodia that people from round the world make a special effort to come and see.

    As such it’s the single most important place or thing from which Cambodia can earn foreign currency reserves of its own (as opposed to aid money, or from Casinos at the borders).

    And since nearly everyone who goes to Cambodia gets there from Thailand, it would be natural to assume that this would be Cambodia’s most modern, best maintained roadway.

    To believe that would be the definitive proof that you do not understand Cambodia.

    There is probably no worse major road in Cambodia (certainly none that I saw) than the one from the Thai border to Siem Riep, where Angkor Wat is located.

    A dusty, potholed, uneven, and indescribably rough dirt track in dry season, it becomes a river of muddy molasses during rainy times (which thankfully I didn’t get to experience.)

    This route -- aside from the tourist travelers, is also Cambodia’s primary lifeline of trade from Thailand -- its window on the “west” -- as opposed to its less important trading relationship with Viet Nam.

    Fourteen hours of spine compressing hell is not unusual for a trip from Bangkok to Siem Riep.

    Hugely overloaded (truck) lorries compete with pedestrians and cattle herders for the limited space on this dirt track.

    Busted suspensions and badly balanced loads stacked maybe 25 feet from the truck bed are common. A fleeting loss of concentration at night puts truckers off the semi-hard packed dirt and onto the sometime swampy soft rice field adjacent to it -- causing the truck to rollover. I saw 3 overturned lorries on that road.


    Most anyone with money and sense flies to Siem Riep from Bangkok. Many airlines make the quick flight -- and the conventional wisdom is that these airlines have paid bribes that’ve delayed the long promised paving of the road so as to limit the potential for competition.

    I traveled part of the way on this road to Siem Riep on the bicycle that I’d brought with me from America. (I travel most everywhere with my bicycle -- my bike's experienced more of the world than had junior, before the courts made him prez.)

    With most of my heavier gear being taken on ahead of me by others, I was traveling fairly light. What was a monstrously jarring roller coaster ride for motor vehicles was actually much less of an endurance test for a mountain biker doing 10 MPH.

    After hours of cruising, I was finally on a relatively smooth and empty part of the dirt road, completely alone, not another vehicle, beast, or pedestrian to be seen.

    Looking back I’m surprised to see some other cyclists maybe a half mile behind -- and I slowed my pace so that they could catch up.

    They were a pair of Germans who had biked all the way from Germany (!!). Their bikes were piled with gear -- including oddly, tents and poles, which they’d stowed so that they were perpendicular to their bike (and sticking out a couple of feet from each side). Long haul cyclists won’t usually carry tents, since they normally expect to get find lodging somewhere, and weight is your enemy.

    Though friendly, their limited english made conversation a painfully boring, repetitive loop.

    I decide to up my pace and politely put some distance between us. Riding a comparatively unloaded mountain bike I’m soon a 100 yards ahead of the heavily loaded Germans. My thoughts drift off to the things, places, and adventures that await me.

    Just then out of the blue the Germans catch up and pass me -- and as they do the tent pole sticking out from their bike rack snags the dropped handlebar of my bike -- instantly knocking me down, hard.

    They’re incredibly embarrassed -- and apologize profusely.

    They had thought that I was racing them, and being competitive hustled to catch up.

    Though I’m bloody and shaken up, I know that I’m not seriously hurt. But I’m pissed.

    They want to break out their first aid kit but I’m in no mood for more germans. I wave them off angrily -- tell them I’m fine -- to just go on without me -- to just go !!

    In the months of travel in asia, including biking through the traffic insanities of Bangkok, Phnom Penh, and Saigon, my only accident was when I was alone on a road with fellow western cyclists...
    Last edited by BARYE; 05/31/2006 at 12:25 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)

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