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  1.    #1  
    Personal data on millions of US veterans stolen
    By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters)

    Personal data on 26.5 million U.S. veterans was stolen from the residence of a Department of Veterans Affairs employee who was not authorized to take the material home, exposing them to possible identity theft, the department said on Monday.

    The data included names, Social Security numbers and dates of birth for the military veterans and some spouses, the department said, although there had as yet been no indication it had been used for identity theft. The electronic data related to everyone discharged from the military since 1975.

    "We are going to send out an individual notification letter to every veteran to the extent possible," warning them of the risk of identity theft, Veterans Affairs Secretary Jim Nicholson said.

    Nicholson said the theft of the data from the employee's home took place this month, but declined to identify the employee, the location of the burglary or how long the employee had the data at his home. The FBI said the theft occurred in the Maryland area and is being looked at by the FBI's Baltimore field office.

    Officials said equipment containing the data was stolen, but Nicholson would not say whether a government laptop computer was involved...

    ...Nicholson said the government was setting up a toll-free number, 1-800-333-4636, for veterans to call if they notice anything suspicious, as well as putting information on a government Web site, www.firstgov.gov.

    ...the employee "took home a considerable amount of electronic data from the VA which he was not authorized to do. It was in violation of our rules and regulations and policies."...
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  2. #2  
    Damn that Bush!
  3. #3  
    I heard this on the news. I suspect that this "robbery" was a set up. Why would anyone take files like that home? 26,000,000! Yeah, right.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911sforever
    I heard this on the news. I suspect that this "robbery" was a set up. Why would anyone take files like that home? 26,000,000! Yeah, right.
    Something does smell mighty fishy with this story.
    Make It Happen!!
    If you don't, who will?
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911sforever
    I heard this on the news. I suspect that this "robbery" was a set up. Why would anyone take files like that home? 26,000,000! Yeah, right.
    The stolen data was on his laptop and an external hard drive.

    "The burglar or burglars took a laptop, an external drive and some coins."

    {edit}: though I had heard yesterday a report that mentioned data CDs -- I haven't seen this info repeated anywhere else, so i've deleted those allegations]

    "...In the latest incident, three crucial keys to unlocking a person's financial life name, Social Security number and date of birth may have been set loose. Those cannot be canceled, and a clever thief can use them to begin trying to open new accounts, secure loans, buy property and otherwise wreak havoc on the victim's credit history..."
    Last edited by BARYE; 05/23/2006 at 12:12 PM.
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  6.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs
    Damn that Bush!
    (there's hope yet for ya hoovs !!) --

    this calamity is again even more evidence that junior and his junta care not a bit for the privacy of this nation's citizens.


    how difficult would it have been to have had stricter controls on this very personal information ??

    why was it not encrypted in such a way that it would have been unreadable if it was "lost"

    why would a mid-level worker be able to transport this quantity of personal information off site to his home -- what was the intended purpose ??/

    The thief just by coincidence happened to steal the laptop AND all that data ???

    junior is the head guy and as such is responsible for everything in his administration. This event fits with a pattern where in this junta's has policies that treat our personal privacy like its a privilege that they can grant or take away at their leisure ...
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