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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by Insertion
    Not totally accurate. A .wav is lossless. You won't lose quality going from lossy to lossless. So that part will be fine. Now the original downloaded iTunes file is compressed and degraded to begin with, but converting to wav won't harm it further.
    Not totally acurate. Converting from lossy to lossless reconstructs or invents bits that are not there and results in a slight degradation of quality, admittedly not as much as compressing back to mp3.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim
    The copy protection is "stripped" when a CD is burned. Burning a CD is permitted under the license you, Apple, and the record companies agree to with the sale of a song on iTunes. DMCA does not change that.
    Ok, I am going to try to make this even more simple.

    Here is a law: --> DMCA. It says that it is illegal to circumvent copy protection.

    When we have a law, that prohibits a certain activity, we call that activity against the law, also known as illegal.

    If your point is that itunes sells songs with a licensing agreement that allows burning to a cd, I agree.

    However this statement is false: -->
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim
    Burning a CD is legal. Ripping a CD is legal.
    Both of those are prohibited under DMCA without any provision for fair use whatsoever.

    Read about it here at here, scroll down to Fair Use Under Siege.

    Now, if by "legal" you just mean, it would be HIGHLY unlikely for you to taken to court for stripping copy protection from your itunes downloads you are correct. First, nobody would ever take you to court, and if they did they would loose, since DMCA was a far reaching power grab by hollywood, and blatantly unconstitutional.

    But at this point, arent we back to asking the question, "what is likely to get me caught", more than what is "legal". Whatever "legal" means.
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by theBlaze74
    It says that it is illegal to circumvent copy protection.
    No. You're oversimplifying.

    When you play a copy-protected CD over a set of speakers, you're stripping the song of its copy protection. By your interpretation, playing a copy-protected CD over a set of speakers violates the DCMA. It doesn't.

    DCMA prohibits defeating DRM technologies. The DRM associated with music permits playing songs over a set of speakers. You're not "circumventing" the DRM if you're just doing what the DRM allows.


    Likewise, burning a CD is permitted under Apple's DRM. Apple allows you to burn a limited number of CDs using songs purchased on iTunes.

    Burning a CD with iTunes is in full compliance with the DRM, and is LEGAL under DCMA.


    And DCMA has nothing to say about ripping unprotected CDs.
  4. #24  
    DCMA says nothing about any of the specific cases in your post, and I did not make an interperetation. DMCA simply says that it is illegal to circumvent copy protection. It's not oversimplified, it is that simple. DMCA makes no provisions or exceptions for fair use. In fact, many civil liberties attorneys have said that the way the law is written, it is illegal to remove the cd from the wrapper.

    Furthermore, the original poster was specifically asking how to defeat the iTunes DRM. So even if ripping and burning did not constitute a violation of the DMCA, your suggestion that he burn then rip the files as a solution to strip the DRM would, and even your advice to him did in fact constitute a violation of federal law under DMCA.
  5.    #25  
    Wow look at what I did!

    I like having the spoon to stir the pot.

    hehehe

    thanks for everyones input. Seriously thanks. Yes, even YOU Blaze.
    ONE can be spelled as NEO.
    There is no spoon.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by theBlaze74
    I did not make an interperetation.
    That's exactly what you're doing. You've heard all this hyperbole about DMCA and you're trying to apply it to a situation where it has no relevance.

    The iTunes DRM is not very restrictive. It allows you to burn a DRM-free CD without breaking any DRM rules.


    DMCA simply says that it is illegal to circumvent copy protection. It's not oversimplified, it is that simple. DMCA makes no provisions or exceptions for fair use.
    Are you even reading what I'm saying? Burning a CD in iTunes has nothing to do with fair use. It's explicitly permitted.

    DCMA says it's illegal to circumvent copy protection technology, or DRM. But you can copy a protected song if the DRM allows you to do so.

    That's an important point, so I'll say it again:
    You can copy a protected song if the DRM allows you to do so.

    No one is defeating any DRM. iTunes DRM permits you to burn a CD and remove the DRM wrapper. You don't have to circumvent the DRM. In fact, it's a designed feature of iTunes. (I figure that if I say this over and over, eventually you'll get it.)

    All your paranoid talk about DCMA may apply to some hypothetical DRM that permitted no copying or CD burning. But it doesn't apply to iTunes.


    In fact, many civil liberties attorneys have said that the way the law is written, it is illegal to remove the cd from the wrapper.
    Stop listening to paranoid civil liberties attorneys who are prone to hyperbole. I bet you believe everything they say about the Patriot Act too.


    Furthermore, the original poster was specifically asking how to defeat the iTunes DRM. So even if ripping and burning did not constitute a violation of the DMCA, your suggestion that he burn then rip the files as a solution to strip the DRM would, and even your advice to him did in fact constitute a violation of federal law under DMCA.
    No. iTunes DRM allows the user to make a DRM-free copy of the song by burning a CD. Doing so would be in full compliance with the iTunes DRM, and so would not be violating DCMA.
  7. #27  
    No, the iTunes DRM is designed to lock the songs to a single device.

    The original poster's question was, how do i strip away this DRM so i can listen to these songs on another device.

    Your suggestion was that he burn to a cd, then rip back to mp3 so that he could listen to it on a second device. I cannot imagine you convincing a judge that you were not suggesting a way for him to circumvent iTunes DRM, but that is not even the point.

    The DMCA is an obscene, far reaching, unconstititional law which not only makes it illegal to watch a DVD on your Linux box, but makes it illegal for me to even tell you how to watch a DVD on your linux box.

    For example, theres an article here, about the DeCSS author who just cracked the iTunes DRM and posted it on his website, and it is a federal crime for me to tell you about it.

    Which brings me back to one of my original points, if consumers stop paying money for media for which they have no control over when, how, and where the watch or listen to it, perhaps soon Hdhntr23 will be able to listen to his Backstreet Boys albums wherever and whenever he wants.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by theBlaze74
    No, the iTunes DRM is designed to lock the songs to a single device.
    It's five devices actually, but point taken.
    MaxiMunK.com The Forum That Asks, "Are You Not Entertained?"

    Remember: "Anyone that thinks the Treo should just work right out of the box, shouldn't own a Treo..."
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by theBlaze74
    I cannot imagine you convincing a judge that you were not suggesting a way for him to circumvent iTunes DRM, but that is not even the point.
    You didn't understand a thing I said. I'll say it just one last time. iTunes DRM allows users to remove the DRM by burning a DRM-free CD. Doing so is in complete compliance with the iTunes DRM. It's not a hack. Apple made this business decision to allow the burning of DRM-free CDs. (They could have forced users to burn only DRM'd CDs, but they didn't.) Apple made a legal way to remove the DRM.

    The OP asked for a way to strip the DRM. Someone else posted a link to an application which probably violates DCMA by circumventing the DRM.

    I explained a way to remove the DRM which is in compliance with the DRM itself. It's legal to burn the CD, and it's legal to advise someone to burn the CD.


    As for the DCMA, I'm a believer in free markets. The seller has a right to define and price the product. The consumer has the right to walk away if he doesn't like the terms. He doesn't have a right to buy a product and then change the terms afterward. DCMA enforces DRMs, which prevent people from changing the terms under which they bought the product.

    If Britney Spears wants her CD to be playable only on Fridays between 3pm and 4pm, that's her call. No one is forcing the consumer to buy a CD with restrictive terms.

    You don't have the Constitutional right to own and freely use any copyrighted material in any manner you choose. If you want that right, make your own movie and burn it onto DVD.
  10. #30  
    several regular phones -> sidekick 2 -> treo 650 -> hopefully 700p
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim
    You didn't understand a thing I said.
    I got every word, you're just wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by tcens
    Man, now we're all going to jail.
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by theBlaze74
    I got every word, you're just wrong.
    Nope. You don't get it. You never will.

    Man, now we're all going to jail.
    Not me.
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