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  1.    #1  
    The final paragraphs of the article:

    Judge Ansarullah Mawlawizada, who is handling the case, said he normally takes two months to decide on cases. But because this case is so serious, he expected to hold another hearing within the next week and make a decision.

    Mawlawizada, who kept Rahman's green Bible on his desk, said he respected all religions. He emphasized that he did not favor the aggressiveness of the Taliban, who cut the hands and feet off criminals in a soccer stadium. But he said Rahman had to repent.

    "If he doesn't regret his conversion, the punishment will be enforced on him," the judge said. "And the punishment is death."
    As a co-financier (aka U.S. Tax-payer) of the effort to liberate Afghanistan, I am appalled.

    As a fellow-buh-leever, I applaud (my brother for his courageous stand).

    What's your take?
  2. #2  
    How about a link to the whole article?
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  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Gamble
    How about a link to the whole article?
    DOH!

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  4. #4  
    lol yeah right. BS
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by ClarenceCM3
    lol yeah right. BS
    WHat is BS? Care to elaborate? We're listening.
  6.    #6  
    It occured to me that perhaps I should seek a few additoinal sources. Here are some additional articles I've located:

    From the BBC

    Federal News Radio

    Afgha.com
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim
    What's your take?
    I think Bush needs to talk to Karzai, Presidente a Presidente, about a little thing called religious freedom. I guarantee this is happening more than we know.
  8. #8  
    Most often, when the term Sharia or Islamic Law is used, what is really meant is not Islamic law as such, but the orthodox version from the classical legal schools before the 19th century. The primary reason for this is that beginning with the 19th century, the notion of Islamic law or sharia becomes less clearly defined as a result of divergent developments. Before that, from the advent of Islam in the 7th century until the 19th century, the basic principles of Islamic law had been comparatively stable (Brown 1996, Kafadar 1996).

    To understand what Islamic law means, one has to keep in mind, that before the 19th century, there was no codified law and no lawmaker in the modern sense. Instead, judges implemented the opinions of respected legal scholars. Legal scholars offered advice on all matters of life, and their opinions served not only as the basis for the decisions of judges, but also as guidelines for Muslims on everyday life issues, in matters of ritual and spirituality, as well as in matters formally unrelated to religion. In contrast to modern law, which is designed to be enforced, this is not necessarily the case with Islamic law. Islamic law is rather a collection of different sets of rules directed at different groups of people. Some sections, such as criminal law, clearly are enforceable by courts. Others, such as sections on spiritual growth, are merely individual guidelines which are not enforceable by the society (Brown 1996, Hallaq 2001).
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  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by ClarenceCM3
    Most often, when the term Sharia or Islamic Law is used, what is really meant is not Islamic law as such, but the orthodox version from the classical legal schools before the 19th century. The primary reason for this is that beginning with the 19th century, the notion of Islamic law or sharia becomes less clearly defined as a result of divergent developments. Before that, from the advent of Islam in the 7th century until the 19th century, the basic principles of Islamic law had been comparatively stable (Brown 1996, Kafadar 1996).

    To understand what Islamic law means, one has to keep in mind, that before the 19th century, there was no codified law and no lawmaker in the modern sense. Instead, judges implemented the opinions of respected legal scholars. Legal scholars offered advice on all matters of life, and their opinions served not only as the basis for the decisions of judges, but also as guidelines for Muslims on everyday life issues, in matters of ritual and spirituality, as well as in matters formally unrelated to religion. In contrast to modern law, which is designed to be enforced, this is not necessarily the case with Islamic law. Islamic law is rather a collection of different sets of rules directed at different groups of people. Some sections, such as criminal law, clearly are enforceable by courts. Others, such as sections on spiritual growth, are merely individual guidelines which are not enforceable by the society (Brown 1996, Hallaq 2001).
    In light of this explanation, is it appropriate to conclude that your classification of "BS" was leveled at the article's possible misuse of terms?
  10. #10  
    It seems pretty simple to me: a man is on trial for converting from Islam and could likely face death. The prosecutors are basing their case on Islamic Law. The judge is basing his decision on Islamic Law. If this man dies it will be because of Islamic Law. Now, one could say that this is only their interpretation of Islamic Law but it seems to me that there are many examples of such interpretation across the Islamic world.
  11. cardio's Avatar
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    #11  
    Redbelt, you normally bring rational input to situations such as these. Do you have any information to help us understand why a person would be put to death because he chose to not follow a particular religion?

    It seems to me that everytime these situations arise the Islamic leaders refuse to stand up and stop the actions. I hear how this is an isolated incident and not to blame the religion, but how many isolated incidents does it take to show a trend?
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  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    Redbelt, you normally bring rational input to situations such as these. Do you have any information to help us understand why a person would be put to death because he chose to not follow a particular religion?

    It seems to me that everytime these situations arise the Islamic leaders refuse to stand up and stop the actions. I hear how this is an isolated incident and not to blame the religion, but how many isolated incidents does it take to show a trend?
    Now is this because they are afraid to stop the action or because religion forbids it? I'm not familiar with Islam but I'm thinking more of the effect of you leave us you die type mentality. That's insane but then again we have to realize that some countries can't practice religious freedoms to convert anytime like the wind blows like we do. What I want to know is did this man have a family and what actually happens to them?
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    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigBadWolf
    Now is this because they are afraid to stop the action or because religion forbids it? I'm not familiar with Islam but I'm thinking more of the effect of you leave us you die type mentality. That's insane but then again we have to realize that some countries can't practice religious freedoms to convert anytime like the wind blows like we do. What I want to know is did this man have a family and what actually happens to them?
    Read the articles. He converted 16 years ago and his family disowned him.
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  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigBadWolf
    That's insane but then again we have to realize that some countries can't practice religious freedoms to convert anytime like the wind blows like we do.
    Why not?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigBadWolf
    What I want to know is did this man have a family and what actually happens to them?
    According to the story, they disowned him.
  15. #15  
    THIS is the free, democratic society Bush lauds as a trophy of the war on terrorism and an example the benefits democracy will bring to the world.

    BS. This version of Afghanistan is proving to be no more tolerant the the taliban. Oh, they draw the line in a different, more "moderate" place, but if you cross the line you're as dead as you would have been under the taliban.

    I, for one, am not willing to waste my tax money, much less my countrymen's blood, defending this version of "freedom." Everyone should write the Bush White House, and their Congressman and Senators, and demand that we tell Afghanistan, in no uncertain terms, that we will not support a government and society that allows something like this to occur. And, that we will not support a government (ours) that supports oppressive regimes such as this one.

    To me, it's just another example that Muslims, by and large, are not willing to join the community of 20th century nations. We should get out of their way and let them kill themselves off in civil wars. And if they appear ready to take their war into more civilized countries, bomb them into the martyrdom they seem to relish. I'm sick and tired of hearing that we should practice tolerance and understanding, when muslims themselves fail to do so on a grand scale.

    It boggles the mind that we invaded Iraq because it was oppressive and tyranical, but we support regimes like Saudi Arabia, which is a total dictatorship that allows no freedom of speech or thought, and China, ditto, and Afghanistan, and on and on and on.
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  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb
    This version of Afghanistan is proving to be no more tolerant the the taliban.
    That's just not true.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs
    Why not?



    According to the story, they disowned him.
    Ahhh I see reading the articles. I don't understand Islamic Law, how can this be justified? 16 years ago I guess doesn't compare to a life long practice of this religion. His family disowned him in the process, thats alone in some countries is worse than death. Your family name that you cherish is tarnished, and bannishment I think would be a fitting, lesser severe punishment. Although I don't agree on Islamic law persecuting those who convert from Islamic beliefs.
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  18. #18  
    Since Sharia is a matter of interpretation, this is the time for the scholars who interpret it differently from the conservative mullahs to speak up.

    I am appalled by the lack of liberal voices in Islamic societies.

    I hope US isn't headed in the same conservative theocratic direction ... (with a different religion getting a stranglehold on it's society)
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  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by aprasad
    I hope US isn't headed in the same conservative theocratic direction ... (with a different religion getting a stranglehold on it's society)
    The differences here are so vast that even drawing a correlation like that is kind of silly. I mean, is the Bush administration or the "far right" of this country advocating anything even close to this?
  20. #20  
    Afghanistan? Never heard of it. Who has time to worry about them when we are busy fighting those responsible for September 11, like Saddam Husein, securing his weapsons of mass destruction, and liberating the peacefull people of Iraq.
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