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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    Not really. MS Beta Antispyware is the previous Editor's Choice tool from Giant Software. I think it was at Version 3 or 4 when MS bought it. I chuckled when I notived via add /remove programs, task manager or the about box (something real simple tho I don't rememeber what) that it was Giant.
    I knew they bought someone, didn't know who. Funny stuff.

    I still don't trust it. Call me a cynic.
    "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen."
    - Albert Einstein
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    MS will soon begin charging $50 a year for AV protection which I find ironic since it will only encourage them to be less vigilant about plugging security holes in their OS.
    True, but you know as soon as they make it free (out of guilt or to drive off competition or whatever), the DOJ and EU will come calling at Symantec's and McAfee's request. So it's a no-win situation, unless they don't get involved at all.

    They're getting enough grief about bundling IE and WMP for free as it is.

    If it means getting rid of NIS' bloatware, I'm all for Microsoft getting involved.
    I'm back!
  3. #23  
    OK, just spoke to my sales rep and tech rep from Symantec. Symantec version 10 IS the same as Norton Internet Security. Version 8, which I am using, is an entiriely different engine. Yes, it uses the same signatures, and the liveupdate software is the same, but the realtime protection and scanning engines are different. Clear as mud, huh?

    Anyway, that's the story they are giving me. I am staying on version 8 as long as it's supported...it's been rock solid for us. I've heard of issues with version 10, which makes sense, since it's the same as NIS....crap.
    "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen."
    - Albert Einstein
  4. #24  
    Just curious and wondering why the OP thinks that the slowness on his network is due to an "Internet Security" problem?

    Many PCs accumulate tons of cruft files on their hard drives, a result of normal operation, and a periodic clean-up can do wonders for rejuvinating performance. If local users have the ability to install things, they tend to do so. Local users often install weather-tool-bars or stock-price-tickers on their systems that slow down the operation of the machine as well as chew away at bandwidth.
  5. naivete's Avatar
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    #25  
    Here's my configuration (you will need xp pro for this), and it works very well for me:

    *Have two accounts for XP, one for everyday tasks (web, documents, etc.), and the other for installation and configuration.
    *Make the account for everyday tasks a user account
    *Make the account for installs an admin account
    *Configure xp to auto-login user account at startup (optional)

    It's a great setup because the spywares can't touch my registry (at least almost all). I used to get out-of-memory messages and browser crashes because of spywares, and have to use things like Hi-jack This and Adaware to clean out my registry on a regular basis. I don't have to do that anymore.

    In addition to my account policy, I'm using Zone Alarm's Internet Security Suite. It's not free, but they do have a stand alone free product for firewall.

    http://www.zonelabs.com/store/applic...en&lid=ho_zass

    http://www.zonelabs.com/store/conten...=dbtopnav_zass
    Last edited by naivete; 03/16/2006 at 10:28 AM.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    Jack, I was going to ask which form you owned
    It's the long form
  7.    #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by ghiscott
    Just curious and wondering why the OP thinks that the slowness on his network is due to an "Internet Security" problem?

    Many PCs accumulate tons of cruft files on their hard drives, a result of normal operation, and a periodic clean-up can do wonders for rejuvinating performance. If local users have the ability to install things, they tend to do so. Local users often install weather-tool-bars or stock-price-tickers on their systems that slow down the operation of the machine as well as chew away at bandwidth.
    I have not completely concluded that it is All and Only an Internet issue.
    These are Workstations w/ Minimum Programs Required for Task @ Hand.
    AutoCad 2004, A Building Information Modeling (BIM) Program, StruCalc (Jack will Probooooly have something to say about that ) QuickBooks, MsOffice, Etc. It's only after we Tied in to the; I beleive T-1 Line that's Broadcasted Throughout our Complex that these Boggdown issues began.
    I do appreciate your suggestions, I am very particular of what gets loaded on our systems, and do expect a Normal Slowdown w/ time and in relation to what is running in the Background.
    Thanks,
    Berdi
    Just call me Berd.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by ghiscott
    Just curious and wondering why the OP thinks that the slowness on his network is due to an "Internet Security" problem?

    Many PCs accumulate tons of cruft files on their hard drives, a result of normal operation, and a periodic clean-up can do wonders for rejuvinating performance. If local users have the ability to install things, they tend to do so. Local users often install weather-tool-bars or stock-price-tickers on their systems that slow down the operation of the machine as well as chew away at bandwidth.
    Spyware and viruses are very likely culprits for slow-down on a PC. They are of course not the only culprits. The coincidence of getting broadband access at the time the slowdown began points very quickly to spyware and/or viruses, however. In any rate, a defense against malware is highly recommended. If they don't resolve your performance issue, you can look at other causes. Just my 2 cents...
    "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen."
    - Albert Einstein
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by ghiscott
    Just curious and wondering why the OP thinks that the slowness on his network is due to an "Internet Security" problem?

    Many PCs accumulate tons of cruft files on their hard drives, a result of normal operation, and a periodic clean-up can do wonders for rejuvinating performance. If local users have the ability to install things, they tend to do so. Local users often install weather-tool-bars or stock-price-tickers on their systems that slow down the operation of the machine as well as chew away at bandwidth.
    We all have Bill G. to thank for this....I would prefer that most workstations NOT have a web browser. In my experience tho, when you see a sudden slowdown, the first thing I look for is a auto laod AV background task.....for some mysterious reason, when contracts expire such slowdowns mysteriously pop up.

    Tyring to run as cans or bot scans when puter is in this condition is an agonizingly slow process. The AV check is fast and easy with Mike Lin's help.

    http://www.mlin.net/StartupCPL.shtml

    Once that's done, I move onto ad-aware, spybot, CW SHredder and other tools. Still no reliable registry tool almost as likely to get false indicators as bad ones. The windows registry has gotta be the worse OS idea ever.
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by ExtraOrdinaryJo
    Firewall: ZoneAlarm Pro or Sygate are both very good. XP's built-in is weak and has missed a great deal, in my experience.
    Yeah, will try on this... my comrade's advise.
    Love is a chemical state of mind that's part of our genes and influenced by our upbringing. We are wired for romance in part because we are supposed to be loving parents who care diligently for our helpless babies.

    Gadget begets gadgets
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    True, but you know as soon as they make it free (out of guilt or to drive off competition or whatever), the DOJ and EU will come calling at Symantec's and McAfee's request. So it's a no-win situation, unless they don't get involved at all.

    They're getting enough grief about bundling IE and WMP for free as it is.

    If it means getting rid of NIS' bloatware, I'm all for Microsoft getting involved.
    I want IE out, WMP out, Fast Find Out, WU2 out and MS AV out. If they wann aprovide it as a SEPARATE utility, I have noi issue with any of them, free or not.

    It would be like letting the car companies sell gas.....they'd have to be kinda stupid to make fuel effcient technology and thereby cut profits from their "fuel division".
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    I want IE out, WMP out, Fast Find Out, WU2 out and MS AV out. If they wann aprovide it as a SEPARATE utility, I have noi issue with any of them, free or not.

    It would be like letting the car companies sell gas.....they'd have to be kinda stupid to make fuel effcient technology and thereby cut profits from their "fuel division".
    Good luck with Linux then!

    See, I'm the exact opposite. I want as much built in as possible, as long as it's best of breed or close enough, so that I don't have to worry about compatibility headaches. IE and WMP work fine for me, I use Firefox occasionally, and it doesn't do enough for me, especially if it wasn't free.

    It's funny that you advocate an "out of the box" approach for your Treo, but would prefer 3rd party software for your PC though.
    I'm back!
  13. cardio's Avatar
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    #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    It's the long form
    "If It Weren't For The United States Military"
    "There Would Be NO United States of America"
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    IE and WMP work fine for me, I use Firefox occasionally, and it doesn't do enough for me, especially if it wasn't free.
    Have you ever tried Deepnet Explorer? I use this instead of Firefox or IE. It is safer than IE and has tabbed browsing.
  15.    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeReaction
    Have you ever tried Deepnet Explorer? I use this instead of Firefox or IE. It is safer than IE and has tabbed browsing.
    Advanced or Standard?
    Just call me Berd.
  16. #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeReaction
    Have you ever tried Deepnet Explorer? I use this instead of Firefox or IE. It is safer than IE and has tabbed browsing.
    No, I've never heard of it. Thanks for the tip, I'll download it tonight and give it a spin.

    I'm still looking forward to IE 7. I may be the only one.
    I'm back!
  17. #37  
    Standard has browser and RSS. Advanced adds P2P. I just use the standard. You can de-select the RSS if you want. I don't use them.
  18.    #38  
    Ok, It seems most are leaning to ZoneAlarm Pro.
    What about ZA's Internet Suite?
    http://www.zonelabs.com/store/application;jsessionid=EZC7VogXhQ1h5gWcBRE1E9pMaDHf4js1ZLqp1WTSEs7DTsehLkf0!388531260!-1062696903!7551!7552!NONE?namespace=zls_catalog&origin=global.jsp&event=link.skuList&dc=12bms&ctry=U S&lang=en&lid=nav_db
    Just call me Berd.
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by berdinkerdickle
    Ok, It seems most are leaning to ZoneAlarm Pro.
    What about ZA's Internet Suite?
    http://www.zonelabs.com/store/applic...=en&lid=nav_db
    I demo'ed it a year or two ago and didn't like it. I preferred NIS to ZA's Internet Suite, even though I've soured on NIS since then. If someone's using it now, I'd like to hear their thoughts as well.

    I got my 30 day renewal notice today from NIS, so I will be in the market soon as well. Early leaders are D-Link's SecureSpot and Microsoft's One Care.
    I'm back!
  20. naivete's Avatar
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    #40  
    I've been using McAfee until about 10 months ago when I switch to using ZA's internet suite. I've been very happy with it so far. Here's an article and video on it.

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1836243,00.asp

    http://reviews.cnet.com/ZoneAlarm_In...-31447702.html
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