Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1.    #1  
    With the Verizon Treo 650 coming out any day...is Cingular Treo 650 price likely to drop right away in response to the additional competition? Anybody have thoughts?
    Jeff
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > Treo 750 > AT&T Tilt > Treo 750 > Treo Pro
    John 16:33
  2. #2  
    doubtful
  3. #3  
    I doubt it .... what does the Verizon have to offer that the Cingular one doesn't ? Now if the Verizon had EV-DO, that would knock it down but at this point, Cingular has the only broadband service on the Treo....so if anything, I'd expect Cingular to maintain a price premium. Then again, last I looked Amazon's Sprint 650 was $150 more than their $299 Cingular.
  4. #4  
    wait till T-mobile sells it, or Hell freezes over
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    I doubt it .... what does the Verizon have to offer that the Cingular one doesn't ? Now if the Verizon had EV-DO, that would knock it down but at this point, Cingular has the only broadband service on the Treo....so if anything, I'd expect Cingular to maintain a price premium. Then again, last I looked Amazon's Sprint 650 was $150 more than their $299 Cingular.
    There's really not a realized speed advantage when using EDGE over 1xRTT. To say Cingular is the only one with "broadband" is misrepresenting the service.

    But on topic of the thread, I doubt Cingular will lower their price. Aren't they already $50 cheaper than Sprint for an unactivated unit?
  6. #6  
    I hear rumor from reps, that T-Mobile never sells treo650, and never will
    if you want treo650 for T-Mobile, simply go out and buy non-branded
  7. #7  
    The cell phone providers compete on everything EXCEPT phone price. Pay attention to the TV commercials: they're all about features, calling plans, "IN" vs. "Family", etc. No one ever advertises "we sell our phones for less."

    In other words, no, don't expect a price drop on the phone.
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by MisterFuhrman
    There's really not a realized speed advantage when using EDGE over 1xRTT. To say Cingular is the only one with "broadband" is misrepresenting the service.
    I'll say "sometimes true" to sentence 1 and "I disagree" to sentence 2.

    I'll address sentence 2 first.

    The March 22 issue of PC Mag has an article on "Broadband Wireless:

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1772919,00.asp

    "For now, two cell-phone companiesóCingular and Verizon Wirelessóoffer 3G networks in the U.S. (Cingular has two networks, one from its merger with AT&T.).....EDGE is only marginally 3G; some experts consider it a 2.5G network. But it's still a major jump ahead of the slow (30- to 50-Kbps) GPRS speeds you're used to getting."

    So the fact remains there are only 3 broadband services (well not counting Nextel's experiemental OFDM) in existence. ... UMTS / EDGE / EVDO. Even if you join the 2.5 G camp, 2.5G is still broadband.

    As for the first part, what hampers EDGE is the latency. So with short transfers, when you add up the latency + the transfer time, overall speed can sometimes be comparable to non broadband servcies. Latency is the pause between switching from send / receive so on long transfers teh speeds are comparable ro CDMA. On larger downloads the speeds are NOT comparable.

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1772935,00.asp

    In PC Mag's tests, the average download seed with EDGE was 220 Kbps as compared to 1,100 w/ EVDO and 80 Kbps with Sprint's CDMA. With the latency, a short e-mail will take the same amount of time to get done on eotehr service and browsing PDA'd versions of web sites won't be all that different.

    However, when downloading a 2 MB spreadsheet or that 10 MB movie trailer, you will very definitely see the advantage of broadband wireless as latency's effect on the large download is minimal.

    This can easily be checked at the dslreports site when doing the speed tests. Compare the test results of the various "byte size" tests and you see a marked improvement as byte size increases.
  9. #9  
    Ahhh, if you consider 2.5G to be broadband, then 1xRTT is broadband as well. It's actually 2.5G, although Sprint has touted it as being 3G since it's launch in August of 2002.

Posting Permissions