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  1.    #1  
    I know that Cingular uses both the 850 & 1900 Freq's, but I have a question to how they are deployed:

    In most (normal/typical) metropolitan areas, do cell co.'s or Cingular in particular (now that they have merged w/ ATT) use both in the same towers/area? or is it more likely to have a tower w/ 800 in one area and 1900 in another area?
  2. #2  
    it depends on when the license was purchased. cingular is one of the original cellular proividers since it is the conbination of 2 baby bells, SBC and BellSouth. the only areas where the company has 1900 or PCS spectrum is new areas or AT&T areas. Several years ago AT&T sold off or traded its 850 frequencies for 1900. Probably in preperation for the merger, as it made AT&T a better fit for the 2 companies. Yes I said a couple of YEARS ago... I believe companies start things in motion that far out.

    I know cingular has 1900 only in north and south carolina, and in California. These are two areas that were bought relatively recently, but I am sure there are more.
  3. #3  
    which of the two frequencies is better?
    Off to iPhone land...
  4. #4  
    Well... the one that presently serves you. Seriously, 850 has better penetration which usually means better indoor performance.

    Todd/Indy
  5. #5  
    I thought 850 was out in Cali too? Is there a map that shows where the new company has 850 and 1900 coverage, respectively?
    Off to iPhone land...
  6.    #6  
    Posted by Todd
    Well... the one that presently serves you. Seriously, 850 has better penetration which usually means better indoor performance.

    I was under the impression that 850 has better building penetration and 1900 actually gets better range (in the open areas).

    What I was hoping for that most areas have an overlaping area of both 850 & 1900 so we could get the best of both worlds.
  7. #7  
    Which is why, if you have a choice, it is probably better to get a Cingular phone. It's firmware will pick the stronger of the signals, whether it is from an old Cingular or old AT&T tower.

    In the same area, an old AT&T phone will probably stick with the AT&T tower while it has signal, only going to the stronger Cingular tower if it loses the AT&T tower.

    The reason I'm planning to drop Sprint when my contract is up is because my signal strength is low at home. On the other hand, a couple of times when I first got the phone, I noticed that a roaming tower is available with much stronger service. If I could force it's usage, I would pay extra for the roaming package $5? a month extra, and just stay with Sprint.
  8.    #8  
    kkrieser,
    exactly what I have been thinking also. I currently have sprint (actually still samsung I300) and have real spotty service at home. I have a cingular phone thru my company that get great service everywhere. Our deal w/ cingular though (sponsorship) is we get the cheap discontinued phones for free. So I am waiting for the 650 and will buy that and either put the current sim in that, or even go ahead a get a contract and have my work phone forwarded so I can keep a "work" cell # and a personel cell #. Either way, I don't want to carry 2 devices.
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by kkrieser
    Which is why, if you have a choice, it is probably better to get a Cingular phone. It's firmware will pick the stronger of the signals, whether it is from an old Cingular or old AT&T tower.

    In the same area, an old AT&T phone will probably stick with the AT&T tower while it has signal, only going to the stronger Cingular tower if it loses the AT&T tower.
    I was in the Cingular store today and that's what the salesman told me: That Cingular phones are going to have better reception because they pick up the Cingular tower first, the AT&T tower only if the phone can't get the Cingular tower.

    But I wonder -- does this make much of a difference when it comes to better reception? Or is it a matter of where you are and if your particular location has more Cingular towers than AT&T towers, etc.? I'm curious because we're thinking of switching our family's plan and phone from AT&T to Cingular.
  10. #10  
    This may be a bit off topic, but I was in a Cingular factory store a week ago to get a GAIT phone activated (this is the one with both GSM and TDMA and analog--universal). FWIW, they would not/could not do the TDMA activation (Cingular/ATTWS is phasing it out). The phone does work on Cingular GSM. They do however now use a 64k SIM card (relatively new), which apparently might not work in some older phones. ALso, supposedly this particular SIM card allows Cingular to load balance the network between Cingular and ATTWS towers/frequencies. Anyone know if this is true? This might negate any advantage to a Cingular branded GSM phone.
  11. #11  
    I am not clear on what advantage to having a Cingular Branded phone ever had? I am on Cingular, but never had a branded phone. I always talked them into given me retention credit without buying phone from them. (Without contract)
  12. #12  
    I believe you will probably always have issues of, in different locations, an old AT&T tower may be better, or a Cingular tower. It could depend on things as simple as buildings, etc. So being free to switch to whichever tower gives you an additional bar or two may be handy.

    You probably want to be sure that whatever Cingular phone you choose supports the ESN. They may have old SIMs and phones that prefer Cingular.

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