Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1.    #1  
    What an interesting time I had yesterday. I upgraded my Treo 270 with the T-Mobile Internet 2mb plan. I previously used GPRS on my Treo 180 to try it out. Used it a week and then canceled hoping for some price reduction in rates that still has not come. Oh well, thought I'd add the 2mb plan for just e-mail and see what comes.

    My problem began when after finally having the GPRS turned on, every time I closed the lid after connecting, it would disconnect from GPRS. So much for always on I thought. I tried any number of things, but evertime I turned the Treo off with either the top button or by shutting the lid, the GPRS would disconnect. I knew it wasn't that way on my 180 so I call..... CUSTOMER SUPPORT.

    Well, at least you don't have to wait as long for T-Mobile customer support as you do Handspring but.... ta da.... they're just as incompetent (at least regarding my question.) They actually told me that that was the way it was supposed to do. It was supposed to disconnect when you shut the lid. I proceeded to contend to the point of arguing with this gal till finally she put me through to the wireless division.

    Now I'm talking to that alien you can hardly understand, (you know who I'm talking about) and low and behold he gives the same line. I tell him how absolutely incorrect he is and he just contends that GPRS is designed to turn off when you shut the lid or turn off the Treo ( I know not to turn off the radio ). It was absolutely a circus talking with these two. He then tells my I need to talk to Handspring technical support so they can explain to me why the Treo 270 has been designed that way.

    By this time I'm exasperated and laughing my head off. I stay on hold for some really bad music waiting for Handspring when I remember that the normal hold time with them is an hour and hang up after a few minutes.

    Today, I woke up connected to T-Mobile Internet and guess what... it stays connected. Go figure. But hey... where does the above incompetence come from. It was absolutely a zoo. They just wouldn't listen to anything I had to say. All I can say is "Thank God for forums like this where you can really get to know and understand all about the Treo."

    Bruce
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  2. #2  
    Hi Bruce,

    I don't agree with you bashing underpaid support CSRs. There are better ways to make yourself feel good than comparison.

    T-Mobiles network is a patchwork built up from multiple networks purchased by VoiceStream over a few years. This network was purchased by T-Mobile and then upgraded to GPRS by adding equipment to the disparate tower and central control infrastructure.

    GPRS and 1xRTT networks are always on only in the sense that your virtual IP session is maintained on the network. A live connection is not maintained all the time. Your connection is known as a PDP context for GPRS networks. Even if you hop to a new cell tower connection, the next time you check mail, the network can identify that you already have a connection and make a quick re-connect. But once you stop using your GPRS connection for a short period of time, the live connection will go dormant.

    The PDP timeout is set differently in different parts of the network and can be dynamically changed throughout the day. Each cell has a number of ports on it to allow voice and data connections. During busy periods, the network dials up the voice connecion capacity and down the data capacity. The way they dial down the data capacity is by reducing the number of GPRS channels that your phone can acquire in either direction (perhaps down to 1 in and one out from a max of 8 which is also dependent upon your handset). They also can make PDP contexts age very quickly so that you will see one of two types of behavior:

    1. Your GPRS connection is explicitly dropped by the network so that you need to re-connect and establish a new PDP context. This is a pain and I have not seen it done very often. Network maintenence is more likely than being kicked off for capacity.

    2. Your PDP context times out very quickly. While the Treo will partially control the timeout of the context it is primarily the etwork telling the Tro to go 'gray' where the live connect is put to sleep through lack of byte traffic.

    I hope this makes up a bit of the shortfall of support. Some of this stuff they are not allowed to discuss even if they wanted to.
    Last edited by Poryphyron; 05/01/2003 at 04:27 PM.
  3. #3  
    FWIW, Cingular here in the SF Bay Area is reportedly (and by my own experience) configued to drop your GPRS connection after 1 hour of inactivity.
  4.    #4  
    Thanks for the feedback. Perhaps the word "*****" was strong, I admit, but there is absolutely no excuse for T-Mobile's CSR, then the wireless division CSR, then the product specialist CSR giving totally errant advise on the Treo. I repeat... no excuse. Surely by the time I got to the product specialist, he would have the straight information.

    I fully understand the potential for being dropped and having to reconnect. I also understand that some carriers may emply timeouts after certain periods of time. That has nothing to do with my particular issue.

    My issue is the 3 CSRs contending that the GPRS connection is supposed to close when you shut the lid on the Treo. I know that's not the case as does every Treo user who uses T-Mobile Internet... but none of the CSRs knew it. For that they deserve to be called to task. Would you not agree?
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  5. #5  
    I agree with the rant, although lay responsibility on the company for providing lip service instead of customer service. There is a horrendous trend that conincided with the telecommunications build up, of financing new acquisitions through abandoning traditional services. The customer service at all these companies is appalling. I would like to direct my hostility to someone other than these underpaid, undertrained employees, but they are directed not to let me. So unfortunately the poor schmuck on the front lines has to take the flak.
  6.    #6  
    You are most correct Dennisl and I wonder if there's any chance that it will ever change. I'll try to keep your post in mind the next time I have do deal with the grrrrrrrr..... CSRs.
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by Poryphyron
    The PDP timeout is set differently in different parts of the network and can be dynamically changed throughout the day. Each cell has a number of ports on it to allow voice and data connections. During busy periods, the network dials up the voice connecion capacity and down the data capacity. The way they dial down the data capacity is by reducing the number of GPRS channels that your phone can acquire ...
    WOW. This is amazingly insightful stuff. Thanks for sharing! I'm going to go share this with some of the folks on hiptop.com who have been complaining about GPRS drops......
    Toomer
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by riverbruce


    Now I'm talking to that alien you can hardly understand, (you know who I'm talking about)
    Riverbruce, I am sorry to hear about your problems..but who are you talking about? Please enlighten me. BTW the hold time on the wireless line is only a few minutes from my experience...and its a 24 hour line.
    My life is in my Treo... Where is yours?
  9. #9  
    Hi RiverBruce

    Ultimately I agree that the CSRs should have known that this was odd behavior on your phone. There must be a training deficit there.

    I found a good deal of insights on GSM/GPRS networks by reading a book from McGraw Hill called GPRS Demystified by Hoffman. This is the best book I have found on this technology that is decipherable by non-engineers.
  10.    #10  
    Thanks Poryphyron

    I'll peruse it tonight at Barnes & Nobles over a Carmel Macchiato.
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  11. z3bum's Avatar
    Posts
    717 Posts
    Global Posts
    723 Global Posts
    #11  
    While it's true that GPRS is supposed to be 'always on', I find that it drops randomly using my Treo. Oddly enough my T68i stays connected longer, but ultimately it drops too. in addition, none of my GPRS devices get more than 2 channels, hence they act like 9.6 to 28.8 modems most of the time. Even my Sierra Wireless aircard 750 is relatively slow and slower than a 56k modem. that said, the Treo works ok as a messaging device with 'lite' web browsing (Plinkit.com style sites) I am reading and responding to Treo Central now using the Treo! I think people have to realize that GPRS and related devices are a stepping stone to better wireless (as opposed to the old CDPD network) and that the future will eventually brighten!

Posting Permissions