Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI. Please use the link to see the balance of this story!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Big Names in Tech Back AT&Tís Bid for T-Mobile
    By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED, June 6, 2011, 11:00 pm

    AT&T's Bid for T-Mobile Is Backed by Microsoft and Facebook - NYTimes.com

    In its quest to win approval of its $39 billion takeover of T-Mobile USA, AT&T just got a lot of help from its friends.

    Eight technology giants, including Facebook and Microsoft, and 10 venture capital firms, filed letters supporting the acquisition late on Monday. The letters, filed with the Federal Communications Commission, lent their support to AT&Tís argument that the T-Mobile deal will help the company extend its next-generation data network across the country, helping to meet the growing need for wireless broadband services.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Large corporations will, of course, back this bid for a duopoly, as they are in the position in each of their markets to do the same, and this sets a terrific precedent.

    They remember the AT&T divestiture, and never, ever want that to happen to them.

    Lobbyists are paid tons of money, and have even more money to throw at congressmen and senators - the individual consumer MUST speak up, NOW, and consistently, or they will succeed and corporate influence will continue to become more important than any of the individual citizen's rights.

    This is a great article, Jay, thanks.. it points to how AT&T thinks they can get this pushed through - and why they arent worried about the $3b penalty to T-Mobile if it doesnt pass.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Large corporations will, of course, back this bid for a duopoly, as they are in the position in each of their markets to do the same, and this sets a terrific precedent.

    They remember the AT&T divestiture, and never, ever want that to happen to them.

    Lobbyists are paid tons of money, and have even more money to throw at congressmen and senators - the individual consumer MUST speak up, NOW, and consistently, or they will succeed and corporate influence will continue to become more important than any of the individual citizen's rights.

    This is a great article, Jay, thanks.. it points to how AT&T thinks they can get this pushed through - and why they arent worried about the $3b penalty to T-Mobile if it doesnt pass.
    Hi,

    Of course they will...it means more $ for them!
    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Large corporations will, of course, back this bid for a duopoly, as they are in the position in each of their markets to do the same, and this sets a terrific precedent.

    They remember the AT&T divestiture, and never, ever want that to happen to them.

    Lobbyists are paid tons of money, and have even more money to throw at congressmen and senators - the individual consumer MUST speak up, NOW, and consistently, or they will succeed and corporate influence will continue to become more important than any of the individual citizen's rights.

    This is a great article, Jay, thanks.. it points to how AT&T thinks they can get this pushed through - and why they arent worried about the $3b penalty to T-Mobile if it doesnt pass.
    Great Post!
  5. #5  
    Will selling bandwidth to startup or smaller carriers be a precondition for approval? I'd enjoy seeing the regionals and the smaller pre-paid carriers go GSM and start to compete on price.

    I was a big CDMA booster back in the day, but CDMA is holding up innovation in wireless with its closed handset architecture and poor data performance. This merger could have the unforeseen benefit of pushing some CDMA players into GSM and creating a more competitive mobile landscape.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by brmiller1976 View Post
    Will selling bandwidth to startup or smaller carriers be a precondition for approval? I'd enjoy seeing the regionals and the smaller pre-paid carriers go GSM and start to compete on price.

    I was a big CDMA booster back in the day, but CDMA is holding up innovation in wireless with its closed handset architecture and poor data performance. This merger could have the unforeseen benefit of pushing some CDMA players into GSM and creating a more competitive mobile landscape.
    bmiller;

    I believe they will want to "lease" that bandwidth to others, as a "concession"...

    Anytime a corporation retains ownership but agrees to allow something to be used by someone else or some other corporation, you can bank on the fact that those rates will escalate and never, ever cease to provide not just revenue, but significant profit to that corporation, while adding expense to the competitor who uses it, thereby reducing his/her profit.

    Its a sham, no matter who one looks at it.

    "Growth for the sake of Growth" grew out of the stock market because that's what drives stock prices - the potential for growth, and so corporations do anything to keep making even more money to keep their stock prices rising....

    The problem is, when is enough, enough? Eventually, corporations can only "earn enough on their own" and they need to devour the competition to acomplish this, and, when that happens too much, you get what we have here in the US carriers: a duopoly, with Sprint and T-Mobile truly being acquisition targets because they just can't compete.

    Again, see my post above: the real solution here is to break up the carriers that have over 15% of the US customers into separate companies, like they did with AT&T in the early 90's...

    Then, there would be true competition again.
    Last edited by LCGuy; 06/10/2011 at 01:46 PM.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by brmiller1976 View Post
    Will selling bandwidth to startup or smaller carriers be a precondition for approval? I'd enjoy seeing the regionals and the smaller pre-paid carriers go GSM and start to compete on price.

    I was a big CDMA booster back in the day, but CDMA is holding up innovation in wireless with its closed handset architecture and poor data performance. This merger could have the unforeseen benefit of pushing some CDMA players into GSM and creating a more competitive mobile landscape.
    Not really. The architecture of the handset for CDMA has not had any effect on "innovation". The issue with CDMA is that the carriers want to sell only their handsets in most cases and because of that refuse to reprogram unsupported devices to operate on their networks. That's a disadvantage to the consumer but it doesn't have any effect on "innovation". Verizon could be using a GSM network and they'd still probably still enforce the same policies regarding handsets. CDMA networks COULD run the same way as GSM networks with a "SIM" card if those networks wanted to implement that technology.

    Poor data performance is more on the carrier policies than on CDMA, they chose not to move to new versions of EVDO which would have improved that performance. GSM isn't immune to these same issues hurting it's consumer friendliness. T-Mobile's use of the 1700 band for 3G is a very significant example of this issue, a GSM band that literally only one other place in the world uses. Really the GSM/CDMA battle is going to fade into irrelevance once enough carriers move to LTE.



    Personally I'm hoping this deal falls through and that compensation package AT&T promised T-mobile for their trouble includes use of the standard US GSM 3G bands. I really don't want to see T-Mobile get absorbed into AT&T...

Posting Permissions