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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    From what I have been reading on this site, (a number of the threads I started), the merger is almost certainly going to lead in higher prices for all customers of all cell companies within the USA.

    I am hoping that NY Sate has decided to draw a line in the sand....having lived most of my life in NYS, I can say that NYS is pro-consumer, (unlike Florida where I now live).

    Lets hope this helps!

    Take care,

    Jay

    NY Attorney General to Review AT&T Purchase of T-Mobile

    By REUTERS, March 29, 2011, Reporting by Dena Aubin; Additional reporting by Jasmin Melvin in Washington and Paul Thomasch in New York; Editing by Maureen Bavdek and Richard Chang

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2011/...gewanted=print

    NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - AT&T Inc's $39 billion bid to buy Deutsche Telekom AG's T-Mobile USA came under scrutiny from New York's attorney general, who said he is looking into its possible anti-competitive impact.

    Citing a potential "near duopoly" as a result of the proposed deal, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said he wants to ensure the acquisition does not reduce access to low-cost cell phone options.

    The deal announced last week would concentrate 80 percent of the U.S. wireless contract customers in two companies -- AT&T/T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless, a venture of Verizon Communications and Vodafone Group Plc.

    "Cell phones are no longer a luxury for a few among us, but a basic necessity," Schneiderman said in a statement. "The last thing New Yorkers need during these difficult economic times is to see cell phone prices rise."

    He said he will "closely scrutinize" AT&T's argument about the benefits of the purchase and weigh that against anti-competitive risks.

    An AT&T spokesman said the company looks forward to sharing information with the AG's office and remains excited about the benefits of the deal, "including improved customer service and expanded high-speed LTE wireless coverage to additional residents." LTE, or long-term evolution, is a new broadband technology.

    T-Mobile could not immediately be reached for comment.

    The acquisition, the world's largest M&A deal this year, is expected to draw intense scrutiny from U.S. antitrust officials.

    Sprint Nextel has complained the deal would dramatically alter the wireless industry, harming consumers, and urged regulators to block it.

    Charles McKee, Sprint's vice president of government affairs, said on Monday the company planned to reach out to others to help oppose the deal.

    "We will bring the regulatory fight wherever we need to," McKee said.

    Consumers Union and public interest group Free Press have also criticized the transaction.

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission, which is trying to extend mobile broadband to more Americans, and Justice Department are expected to take at least a year to review the proposed merger and impose significant conditions if they approve it.
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  2. #2  
    I am all in favor of blocking the merger, but I'm not really sure what power the state's have in this. Can NY's Attorney General actually do anything?
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by pavvento View Post
    I am all in favor of blocking the merger, but I'm not really sure what power the state's have in this. Can NY's Attorney General actually do anything?
    Hi,

    I think they may be able to ...for example a number of years ago, office depot wanted to buy Staples and it derailed by State of Florida suing, (i was surprised that Florida sued at all)...this took place in my town...

    Office Depot was claiming prices wouldn't go up if they bought Staples...however, Office Depot was advertising one price for Leesburg FL, where I live and another for Orlando, which is 45 minutes away.

    Office Depot was running ads in the Lake county section of the Orlando sentinel and a cheaper set of prices In the main section...if you lived in my town you were getting both ads....

    This derailed the merger.....I don't know if that applies to tele-communications....however, if a lawsuit is filed by the state of NY it carries far more weight then if you and I did it, plus the State of NY is paying for all of the court costs....

    I would think the states have major input b/c it does effect millions of users within NYS!

    I am sure there will be more about it in the NY Times in the next few days...this was a piece that the NY Times picked up from Reuters...I expect their business section will have plenty of info on it in the next few days..

    Take care,

    Jay
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  4.    #4  
    Hi all,

    Here is further info. Apparently it is hihgly unusual for NYS to do this, but apprently NYS can do so.

    Take care,

    Jay

    AT&T's T-Mobile USA Purchase Faces Review by New York Over Consumer Impact

    AT&T’s T-Mobile Purchase Faces Scrutiny by N.Y. Authorities - Bloomberg

    By Karen Freifeld - Mar 29, 2011 AT&T Inc. (T)’s proposed $39 billion purchase of T-Mobile USA will undergo a “thorough review” by New York authorities for possible anti-competitive impact, state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said.

    AT&T said March 20 that it agreed to buy T-Mobile from Deutsche Telekom AG. (DTE) The acquisition would combine the second- and fourth-largest U.S. wireless providers. The deal may take a year to win government approval, as U.S. regulators determine whether the transaction will reduce customer choice.

    “Affordable wireless service and technology, including smartphones and next-generation handheld devices, are the bridge to the digital broadband future,” Schneiderman said today in an e-mailed statement. “We want to ensure all New Yorkers benefit from these important innovations that improve lives.”

    Schneiderman said the potential impact of the merger may be greater in Upstate cities such as Rochester, Albany, Buffalo and Syracuse, where there are fewer wireless options, than in New York City. He said he is also concerned about the impact on consumers who have T-Mobile as a “low-cost option.”

    The attorney general’s review will weigh the benefits to New Yorkers against the anti-competitive risks. Schneiderman said he will “closely scrutinize” AT&T’s argument that the merger may be beneficial because of expanded coverage of the company’s next-generation wireless network to underserved rural areas with poor service.

    AT&T Response
    “We look forward to sharing information with the AG’s office and remain excited about the significant consumer and competition benefits that this transaction will provide, including improved customer service and expanded high-speed LTE wireless coverage to additional residents and areas across New York State and the rest of the U.S.,” Mike Buckley, an AT&T spokesman, said by e-mail.

    C. Evan Stewart, an antitrust lawyer and managing partner of Zuckerman Spaeder LLP in New York, said it’s unusual for a state attorney general to get involved in a matter that may be reviewed by the Federal Communications Commission and the Justice Department.

    “What the New York attorney general is going to bring to that process that the Justice Department is not going to bring to bear is unclear to me,” Stewart said a telephone interview. “The more appropriate and traditional way to handle this is to let those folks whose expertise is in these areas weigh in on the appropriateness of it before anyone else makes things more difficult or more easy.”

    The state review will slow the process, the lawyer said.

    “Now the AT&T folks are going to have a different regulator to convince on the merits of this as opposed to the two they already have,” he said.

    Schneiderman’s review was “not surprising” considering the state interest in consumer protection, said Larry Freedman, a partner at Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge LLP, which focuses on telecommunications. “‘Most folks here in Washington believe the heart of the action will be at the Department of Justice and the FCC.”

    Robert Kenny, a spokesman for the FCC, didn’t immediately return a call for comment. Gina Talamona, a spokeswoman for the Justice Department, declined to comment. Hernan Daguerre, a spokesman for T-Mobile, did not immediately return a call for comment.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Karen Freifeld in New York at kfreifeld@bloomberg.net.

    To contact the editor responsible for this story: David E. Rovella at drovella@bloomberg.net.
    .
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. #5  
    T-Mobile customers really need to line up against this. They are the voices that need to be heard loud and clear.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  6. #6  
    The AG for any state can take action if they feel that laws are being broken (or coudl potentially be broken) by companies that do business in their states.. remember the Microsoft hearings from 10 years ago?

    The evidence of a "dualopoly" is insurmnountable, to be honest - having only 2 major carriers serve the entire US, 300,000,000 subscribers, is obviously not good for consumers, and we do have monopolistic precedents in both federal courts for the FCC, FTC, SEC and DOJ and the state courts (for the AG's) to use to help them make their cases (remember Ma Bell and then, later, Microsoft?).

    Im actually finding it rather strange that AT&T and T-Mobile actually believe that they can make this happen and convince everyone that its a good thing.

    About the only thing I can think of here is that they feel that they have enough lobbying power (sigh) and attornies to push this through, which, honestly, is even more scary than the actual merger itself.

    Corporations pay about 5- 10% of the national tax base (ncome tax, that is), leaving the moajority of the cost burden of running the US goverment to the average citizen, yet, corporations literally are treated better than the average citizen, and have more money at their disposal to lobby for laws that benefit only their causes, regardless of its effect on the citizens of the US.

    This will be a VERY telling sign of just how much real "democracy" there is left in our current state of affairs - last I checked, only citizens have the right to vote, but, corporations get away with paying for pretty much anything they want, through lobbying - this has turned out to be WAY more powerful than any civilian's right to vote, sadly enough, nowadays.
    Last edited by LCGuy; 03/29/2011 at 06:33 PM.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  7. #7  
    If T-Mobile can prove it will have to cease business in the US if they are not bought out (huge IF), then the merger will be approved. I don't think any action by the NYC AG will do anything one way or the other.
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  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    The AG for any state can take action if they feel that laws are being broken (or coudl potentially be broken) by companies that do business in their states.. remember the Microsoft hearings from 10 years ago?

    The evidence of a "dualopoly" is insurmnountable, to be honest - having only 2 major carriers serve the entire US, 300,000,000 subscribers, is obviously not good for consumers, and we do have monopolistic precedents in both federal courts for the FCC, FTC, SEC and DOJ and the state courts (for the AG's) to use to help them make their cases (remember Ma Bell and then, later, Microsoft?).

    Im actually finding it rather strange that AT&T and T-Mobile actually believe that they can make this happen and convince everyone that its a good thing.

    About the only thing I can think of here is that they feel that they have enough lobbying power (sigh) and attornies to push this through, which, honestly, is even more scary than the actual merger itself.

    Corporations pay about 5- 10% of the national tax base (ncome tax, that is), leaving the moajority of the cost burden of running the US goverment to the average citizen, yet, corporations literally are treated better than the average citizen, and have more money at their disposal to lobby for laws that benefit only their causes, regardless of its effect on the citizens of the US.

    This will be a VERY telling sign of just how much real "democracy" there is left in our current state of affairs - last I checked, only citizens have the right to vote, but, corporations get away with paying for pretty much anything they want, through lobbying.

    I couldn't agree with you more. Let's see what bones AT&T decides to throw the politicians way. The Government will make it appear as if the people will benefit greatly due to their imposed limitations, yet in a few years we will wonder what happened to cheap/flexible cell plans.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by pogeypre View Post
    If T-Mobile can prove it will have to cease business in the US if they are not bought out (huge IF), then the merger will be approved. I don't think any action by the NYC AG will do anything one way or the other.
    T-Mobile is PROFITABLE, and has been, for some time.

    There can't even go there with any credibility - Sprint would have an easier time using that to justify a Verizon buy-out.

    End of story.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    T-Mobile is PROFITABLE, and has been, for some time.

    There can't even go there with any credibility - Sprint would have an easier time using that to justify a Verizon buy-out.

    End of story.
    My point exactly. The only reason they could use to sway the anti trust hawks is to prove their business will no longer stand without a takeover.

    This is not going to happen, and thus the NY AG actions will not mean anything.
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  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by pogeypre View Post
    My point exactly. The only reason they could use to sway the anti trust hawks is to prove their business will no longer stand without a takeover.

    This is not going to happen, and thus the NY AG actions will not mean anything.
    I dont understand.

    The NY AG actions will address monopolistic potential by the two companies merging, which will hurt the residents of NYS, by decreasing the number of nationally based cell phone providers available to NY residents, and even more so for GSM based providers.

    That has nothing to do with T-Mobile's economic condition - in fact, it doesnt even enter into the picture as a part of the argument.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  12. #12  
    I think he may be saying it's a waste of time for the NY AG to do anything, because the merger can't go through anyway. Because T-Mobile is profitable and can't use the excuse of failure.

    However I'm not convinced it won't go through. AT&T has too many lobbyists paying off the government. The NY AG is looking out from the consumer's end and should continue to do so. We need someone like this who looks out for those whose voices will likely get lost in the shuffle.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  13. #13  
    well said all. I'm with Sprint & if this goes through you might as well kiss them goodbye. That wouls leave only 2. Huge drawback to consumers if this happens. People complain about the prices now. Give them 2-3 yrs later if this goes through and watch them rise.
  14. #14  
    If this merger goes through, Sprint needs to go both GSM and CDMA, keep it's pricing, and rake in angry consumers.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    If this merger goes through, Sprint needs to go both GSM and CDMA, keep it's pricing, and rake in angry consumers.
    Exactly. If AT&T is trying to corner the market, well then bring in the competition! An AG can try to use the only hammer in his tool box which is sue, sue, sue but if AT&T ****es off its customer base then what will they have to show for it when another carriers comes in with GSM or expands their network into AT&T territory?
  16.    #16  
    Hi all,

    Apparently, it is not just NYS objecting to it, "Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said the merger raised concerns, and he was checking with other states on the best approach for a review".

    Here is the entire article:

    Take care,

    Jay


    NY AG to Review AT&T Purchase of T-MobileBy REUTERS

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2011/...gewanted=print

    March 29, 2011, NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - AT&T Inc's $39 billion bid to buy Deutsche Telekom AG's T-Mobile USA came under scrutiny from New York's attorney general, who said he was looking into whether it was anti-competitive.

    Citing a potential "near duopoly" as a result of the proposed deal, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said he wanted to ensure the acquisition did not reduce access to low-cost cell phone options.

    Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said the merger raised concerns, and he was checking with other states on the best approach for a review.

    The deal announced last week would concentrate 80 percent of the U.S. wireless contract customers in two companies, AT&T/T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless, a venture of Verizon Communications and Vodafone Group Plc.

    "Cell phones are no longer a luxury for a few among us, but a basic necessity," Schneiderman said in a statement. "The last thing New Yorkers need during these difficult economic times is to see cell phone prices rise."

    He said he would "closely scrutinize" AT&T's argument about the benefits of the purchase and weigh that against anti-competitive risks.

    SPRINT ALSO FIGHTING DEAL

    An AT&T spokesman said the company was looking forward to sharing information with the attorney general's office and was excited about the benefits of the deal, "including improved customer service and expanded high-speed LTE wireless coverage to additional residents." LTE, or long-term evolution, is a new broadband technology.

    T-Mobile could not be reached for comment.

    "We will certainly be in contact with federal regulators and our sister states to determine the best approach to reviewing these competition issues," Jepsen said in a statement.

    The Bay Citizen, a news website that covers the San Francisco Bay area, reported last week that California's public utility commission planned to look into the deal. The commission did not respond to telephone calls for comment.

    State attorneys general have been involved with telecom antitrust cases before, though it has been more typical for them join with the federal government as plaintiffs, said Glenn Manishin, a partner at law firm Duane Morris who concentrates on antitrust issues.

    Attorneys general joined the government in antitrust cases against Microsoft and Oracle, for example, he said.

    "States have independent authority under their own anti-trust statutes," he said. Since AT&T and T-Mobile provide nationwide service, "that would give a jurisdictional hook for any state attorney general."

    States' interest in the merger is not surprising, given the growth in mobile phone use, Medley Global Advisors analyst Jeffrey Silva said.

    The acquisition, the world's largest M&A deal this year, is also expected to draw intense scrutiny from U.S. antitrust officials.

    Sprint Nextel has complained the deal would dramatically alter the wireless industry, harming consumers, and urged regulators to block it.

    "We will bring the regulatory fight wherever we need to," Charles McKee, Sprint's vice president of government affairs, said on Monday.

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission, which is trying to extend mobile broadband to more Americans, and Justice Department are expected to take at least a year to review the proposed merger and impose significant conditions if they approve it.

    (Reporting by Dena Aubin; Additional reporting by Jasmin Melvin in Washington and Paul Thomasch in New York; Editing by Maureen Bavdek and Richard Chang)
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  17.    #17  
    Hi all,

    This deal is going to continue to ruffle a lot of feathers....the article above says ...

    Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen ...is "checking with other states on the best approach for a review."

    Perhaps a bunch of states will work together, this has happened before..

    take care,

    Jay


    California to Review Proposed AT&T, T-Mobile Merger
    By John Upton|March 24, 2011 12:26 p.m. |In Business

    California to Review Proposed AT&T, T-Mobile Merger - Pulse of the Bay - The Bay Citizen

    California will review the impacts of a proposed AT&T takeover of T-Mobile on the state's wireless customers.

    California Public Utilities Commission President Michael Peevey announced the review Thursday during a commission meeting.

    More telephone customers use wireless services than landlines, according to Peevey.

    “Wireless service is becoming a necessity," Peevey said. "Many consumers have cut the cord."

    The results of the review, which will include potential impacts on wireless customers' coverage and fees, will be forwarded to the federal government.

    The acquisition would reduce the number of major wireless carriers operating in the U.S. from four to three, Peevey said.

    Source: The Bay Citizen (California to Review Proposed AT&T, T-Mobile Merger - Pulse of the Bay - The Bay Citizen)
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    However I'm not convinced it won't go through. AT&T has too many lobbyists paying off the government. The NY AG is looking out from the consumer's end and should continue to do so. We need someone like this who looks out for those whose voices will likely get lost in the shuffle.
    Yep, this is my fear, as well. As I stated at the end of my post above, "lobbying" can get a whole lot more done these days than the threat of losing votes to Senators and congressmen - the reason is two fold:

    1. If they play ball now with the "special interests", they will get a lucrative, great paying job after their term is over;
    2. If they are thinking long term government positions instead of going into the private sector, the "special interest" groups will make huge campaign contributions to help them convince (via marketting techniques) their constituents that they are doing a great job (if you tell people enough lies, you can get enough of them to believe you to vote for you - that's a fact).

    Without Congress and the Senate taking the lead here, in an impartial fashion, AT&T has a huge chance of pushing this through.

    The ONLY way this can happen is when the FCC, FTC, SEC and DOJ chime in, to cite potential antitrust violations - that would be the fuel and guidelines for Senate hearings, if it comes down to that - basically, the states would join together to file a class action suit against the merger - remember the Microsoft antitrust activity case from 10 years ago?

    The State AG's are the ones who will bring enough individual State cases against the merger, and if enough of them happen, (see the articles from above regarding California and Connecticut joining NY), that provides enough foundation for the federal agencies to really probe this with the help of the state AG's research.

    That's a large amount of bureacracy that has to all happen in consort with eachother, and AT&T is likely betting that it will fall apart, with the help of their lobbyists to the Senate and Congress.

    Remember, just a few short years ago, ALL cell phone companies were quietly absolved of any punitive actions for violating privacy laws by disclosing all of their customer telephone records to the govenrment illegally - the press was told to not make a deal about it, and it quietly went away.

    We, the voting citizens, see it as "black and white", however, AT&T see's all of the "grey" areas in between those two areas that it can play in, and has successfully played in, in the past.

    Make NO mistake about this - this merger is all about more revenues and higher profits- exactly what every publically traded corporation is SUPPOSED to aim for.

    But, that's a story for a different thread on a different forum, altogether.

    Last edited by LCGuy; 03/30/2011 at 07:23 AM.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  19.    #19  
    Hi all,

    This is interesting, however I don't know that it would help as Congress doesn't directly have power over the proposed merger...

    Take care,

    Jay


    Lawmaker Has Concerns Over Mobile Megamerger
    April 1, 2011, Reporting by Jasmin Melvin; Editing by Tim Dobbyn

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2011/...gewanted=print

    By REUTERS WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. lawmaker with oversight of technology expressed concern that AT&T Inc's plans to take over T-Mobile USA would stifle innovation in the wireless market.

    Representative Greg Walden, chairman of the House subcommittee on communications and technology, said he did not want to see a merger diminish the vibrant and competitive nature of wireless.

    AT&T's $39 billion bid to buy Deutsche Telekom AG's T-Mobile USA would concentrate 80 percent of U.S. wireless contract customers in just two companies -- AT&T/T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless, a joint venture of Verizon Communications and Vodafone Group Plc.

    AT&T, currently the No. 2 U.S. mobile carrier behind Verizon, has said the merger will spur innovation and economic growth by improving quality and expanding wireless service to 95 percent of Americans.

    But Walden expressed concern about eliminating a national carrier.

    "It seems to me if there are fewer and fewer players in a market, there's less and less opportunity for that creative innovation and invention that has occurred so far in the wireless market," he said at an event sponsored by news service Politico Pro.

    The merger needs the approval of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and the Justice Department and the process is expected to take at least a year.

    Walden has no direct input into those reviews but his subcommittee has oversight of the FCC, and he did not rule out hearings on the merger proposal.

    He said his panel would be very critical of the FCC's merger review process, checking for potential abuses of power.

    Walden criticized agencies that use their authority over mergers to "extort policy changes."

    Congress may have to step in, Walden said, with tighter definitions on agencies' authority over mergers.

    "The FCC needs to look in the mirror on this one because we're going to come at them very strongly, very forcefully," he added.

    SPECTRUM

    AT&T could face a tough battle at the FCC.

    FCC Commissioner Michael Copps said at the onset of the Comcast-NBCU merger that it would be a tough sell. That transaction won a majority of the FCC members' approval, but Copps voted against it.

    He said in an interview this week for C-SPAN television's "The Communicators," that AT&T's proposal "may be an even steeper climb" and that the deal "sucks the oxygen" out of other issues before the FCC, especially spectrum reform.

    But Walden said this was not a concern for him. "I think we're all fairly capable of multi-tasking, and a lot of work goes on even if a hearing isn't announced or scheduled," he said.

    The FCC wants Congress to grant it authority to hold incentive auctions that would compensate broadcasters for giving up some of their spectrum to wireless companies.

    The agency also wants lawmakers to consent to giving a highly sought after chunk of U.S. airwaves known as the D Block to public safety groups to build out a nationwide mobile broadband network for emergency services.

    Walden, a former broadcaster, said he hoped a bipartisan consensus could be reached as spectrum reform is likely to drive innovation, but he was wary of acting too quickly.

    "We're going to have a series of hearings to get all these issues out in the open. We're not going to cram something through," he said.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  20. #20  
    Good to see the states looking out for the "little people"! I only use that term because that's how customers get viewed in these things, commodities. I'm really surprised T-Mobile USA chose to blindside it's customers, because they have to know many are with them because they are not AT&T.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
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