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  1. #81  
    Does everyone realize who the 2nd largest ownership stake in Verizon Wireless belongs to?

    This is about US competition, and the country of the owners isn't part of the equation, IMHO.
  2. rkguy's Avatar
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    #82  
    Doesn't verizon and at&t operate on different bands as well? I expect them to sunset the T-mobile 850 frequency (is that what they use, i forgot) as they bring customers over to new phones. Wouldn't VZ do the same, i.e. keep the network for a period of time and then roll over the towers, esp with Sprint in early days with WiMax and probably switching to LTE (I hope anyway)? In fact, I swapped out my Sprint radio board on my pixi with one from the VZ Pixi and it worked dandy, I don't understand why this wouldn't work straight out of the gate.

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Hi,

    That won't happen....Sprint and V use different broadcast systems...it would cost much too much for V to add many more cell repeaters and antenna that it wouldn't be worth it to V.....the last time a cell company using a different technology bough another was Sprint buying Nextel...it was a complete disater...Sprint lost a ton of money and customers....people didn't want to move from Nextel's system b/c it offered tech choices that Sprint didn't offer or were much to slow to offer....Sprint ended up having to operate 2 different systems for years....viola that gives us the Train wreck of Sprint, who is now slowly crawling out from the mess it made!

    Sprint's stockholders overthrew the board of directors and went thru a number of CEO's trying to fix the mess from that merger!Take care,

    Jay
    Last edited by Rkguy; 03/21/2011 at 03:13 PM. Reason: pre != pixi, emphasis
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
  3. rkguy's Avatar
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    #83  
    Just imagine though, two carriers att and VZ. No way. if att gets this that VZ will be able to. no way
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
  4. Spinfusor's Avatar
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    #84  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Isn't Catherine Zeta-Jones, still doing the commercials?
    Quote Originally Posted by berdinkerdickle View Post
    Nope,
    They replaced her with a cute 20 something brunette girl.
    She is a definite downgrade. CZJ's was great.
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    This can't be good news for the girl on the new T-Mobile commercials. All she does is make fun of AT&T and they will soon be her new bosses. Will we ever see those commercials again? What will become of the dresses? I'll be they are being pulled as we speak.
    Quote Originally Posted by Thead View Post
    I was thinking the same thing. T-mobile's marketing strategy lately has been to just trash AT&T. How ironic.
    This reminds me of Alltel's before Verizon bought the company (although Alltel made fun of everybody). There was an internal video in which Chad and Test Man became friends. They should do the same thing with polka dot girl and the blond guy.
    Last edited by Spinfusor; 03/21/2011 at 06:32 PM.
    "Visits? Well that would indicate visitors."
    "Future events such as these will affect you in the future."
  5. #85  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    So you would be OK with only 2 large US carriers controlling most of the pricing and availability of devices??
    Hi all,

    I'm not happy about there basically being 2 major carriers in the us cell market...as Sprint slowly falls behind!

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  6. #86  
    the big V could still buy sprint and use sprints loads of spectrum they own still unused along with the spectrum they will have when they cancel out nextel in 2013 !!
    ĦṔ-ḶøØṫ-ŦḯØη
    Here is a direct link to webOS Doc for all carriers
    http://www.webos-internals.org/wiki/...octor_Versions
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  7. #87  
    Hi all,

    Here is a little more info.

    Take care,

    Jay

    For Consumers, Little to Cheer in AT&T DealBy JENNA WORTHAM, March 21, 2011

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/te...gewanted=print

    The $39 billion proposed merger of AT&T and T-Mobile could save the companies a lot of money. For everyone else, it could cost a lot of money. No sooner did the two companies announce a $39 billion merger on Sunday than industry analysts began assessing the impact on the biggest potential losers in the deal: consumers.

    If approved by regulators, the merger would leave just three major cellular carriers in the United States, a development that consumer advocates warn could eventually lead to higher prices for a wide variety of services. For this reason the deal is likely to attract close scrutiny in Washington.

    It is too early to say how much — or even whether — rates might rise for consumers, who on average pay $55 a month for their wireless plans, said Roger Entner, who tracks the wireless industry for the Nielsen Company. But while consumers may see some immediate benefits — in network quality, for example — they are not likely to benefit in the long run, some analysts and industry experts said.

    The bottom line, they said, is that competition is likely to suffer, leading to higher prices and less innovation. That is because the deal would leave just AT&T, Verizon Wireless and the much smaller Sprint to divide up the voracious smartphone market — with the AT&T and T-Mobile union likely to dominate the market.

    “Without some of the smaller competitors, you won’t have the competitive pressure that leads to lower prices and innovations and offerings among the carriers,” said Paul Reynolds, electronics editor at Consumer Reports.

    AT&T maintains that the merger will be good for consumers.

    “The benefits of this transaction are possible at this scale and on this timeline only from the combination of these two companies,” Randall L. Stephenson, chairman and president of AT&T, said in a call to investors and analysts on Monday. He added that the merger “will improve network quality” and “give more customers access to more services.”

    Other analysts also had a rosier view, suggesting that AT&T may diversify its offerings if it acquires T-Mobile. T-Mobile has long built its reputation by offering affordable, low-rate cellphone plans, including ones that do not require annual contracts or a minimum voice plan.

    “Having 30 million new subscribers might convince them to add more attractive data pricing,” said Chetan Sharma, an independent wireless analyst, referring to T-Mobile’s customer base. “Things like data family plans could become a reality.”

    Whatever happens to prices, the availability of cellphone coverage in the United States is likely to expand, analysts said. AT&T and T-Mobile have invested in different parts of the country, and customers of the two companies would have access to a larger, combined network. Potentially, the acquisition of T-Mobile, with its additional wireless spectrum, could also help AT&T with the rollout of its next-generation wireless network, known as 4G.

    Improved service and network quality could be another boon. T-Mobile and AT&T use the same underlying GSM cellphone technology, which should reduce any friction of blending the two networks. AT&T could take advantage of T-Mobile’s latest high-speed network, in which the company has invested millions to upgrade and bring online. By adding T-Mobile, AT&T will gain cell sites equivalent to the number it would have taken five years to build, experts say. All this means, in theory at least, that service should improve. But the cost to buy that coverage is likely to go up.

    “Typically, the more competition there is, the faster prices drop,” Mr. Sharma said. “In a situation where there are two main carriers, pricing is not likely to move as much.”

    One burning question raised by the potential of a merger with AT&T is what will happen to the wide range of inventive T-Mobile data plans, which are some of the lowest in the country, and have helped keep pressure on competitors. The company also offers a wider choice of smartphones for younger users, like the popular Sidekick line, which T-Mobile recently said it would revive.

    AT&T is expected to honor contracts through their expirations, but it is unclear what will happen once those contracts expire.

    “The prospect of having those kinds of options go away is a real concern,” said Mr. Reynolds of Consumer Reports. “It’s a welcome offering for people in this market that can be quite unaffordable otherwise.”

    If approved, the merger is expected to save both companies $3 billion annually. That saving, Mr. Sharma said, along with the influx of millions of new consumers, might persuade the company to be more competitive in family data plans as a way to draw in new subscribers and increase competition with Verizon, the new company’s chief rival. If the merger is approved, AT&T would have about 129 million wireless customers and Verizon about 101 million. Sprint has about 50 million customers.

    Another potential byproduct could be a drop in pricing for sleek, high-end smartphones. Hardware makers, for example, might offer AT&T a lower rate for bulk purchases of new smartphones and tablet computers.

    “AT&T’s new scale would give them pricing advantage,” Mr. Sharma said. “You could end up seeing $100 or $150 smartphones for consumers in the future.” A typical smartphone can cost $200 with a contract. One constant in a consumer’s life could remain: frustrating experiences with customer service.

    “In terms of customer satisfaction, AT&T was clearly in last place, below average in comparison to other carriers, including T-Mobile,” he said.

    Although T-Mobile has historically performed well in the annual surveys conducted by Consumer Reports that rate satisfaction, in big takeovers the larger company typically tends to swallow the smaller one, he said.

    “The overall consumer experience might become more like AT&T than T-Mobile,” Mr. Sharma said.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  8. RafRol's Avatar
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    #88  
    Quote Originally Posted by clintwinstead View Post
    Now if we can just get Verizon to buy Sprint, or vice versa, all will be right in the universe.
    Man, I hope you're joking.
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  9. RafRol's Avatar
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    #89  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Hi,

    That won't happen....Sprint and V use different broadcast systems...it would cost much too much for V to add many more cell repeaters and antenna that it wouldn't be worth it to V.....
    Sorry ilovedessert, but not only does Verizon and Sprint use the same network technology (CDMA) they're both are on the same frequencies (1900 & 2100 MHz). It would be super easy for the two to integrate their respective networks; in fact, they can take down redundant towers.

    Let's just pray that doesn't happen.
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  10. #90  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    They may as well get bought up by Verizon. It's V's only way to get back on top in the US. Welcome to the duopoly.
    I have a bad feeling about this, but you're right.
  11. #91  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave.m.elliott View Post
    This is really bad for consumers. What are some of you thinking?

    1. iPhone on T-Mobile? If it doesn't work now, it won't later. What, do you think ink on a paper is going to change this? Also, see number 3 on why there would be no incentive for Apple.
    2. Rates. This should be obviously. Not likely they are going down. Who do you think is going to pay for the costs of the aquisition? Not as if they are going to wait for the 'savings' that comes along with firing tens of thousands of T-mobile employees down the road. We can all be happy that we have even less employed Americans so that a corporation can make more of a buck. Because, we know that the tax base will magically grow when we reduce the income tax on all those workers and somehow offset it with tax breaks for the business. A lap dog says what?
    3. There is no incentive to improve both carriers' networks. There will be no long-term design to have two separate, but somehow wishful thinking, equal networks. Why, because it would be good for the consumer?
    4. Less incentive to improve and innovate.

    Since we'll essentially end of up even less carriers wanting to carry HP hardware, perhaps HP should have put a bid in and truly had their ecosystem. They could partner will Walmart. Sorry. Some of the previous posts rubbed off on me.
    +1. Thank you.
  12. #92  
    Quote Originally Posted by RafRol View Post
    Sorry ilovedessert, but not only does Verizon and Sprint use the same network technology (CDMA) they're both are on the same frequencies (1900 & 2100 MHz). It would be super easy for the two to integrate their respective networks; in fact, they can take down redundant towers.
    Also,
    I'm pretty sure they both can roam off each other's towers.
    Just call me Berd.
  13. #93  
    This statement is pure PRPRPR $and$ $I$ $don$'$t$ $believe$ $this$ $one$ $bit$:
    “The benefits of this transaction are possible at this scale and on this timeline only from the combination of these two companies,” Randall L. Stephenson, chairman and president of AT&T, said in a call to investors and analysts on Monday. He added that the merger “will improve network quality” and “give more customers access to more services.”
    It is more about the stake holders and money. Giving more consumers to more services for more money. AT&T nickle and dime charged me for the services I had before with them. As one movie says: "Greed is good!"
  14. #94  
    Quote Originally Posted by RafRol View Post
    Sorry ilovedessert, but not only does Verizon and Sprint use the same network technology (CDMA) they're both are on the same frequencies (1900 & 2100 MHz). It would be super easy for the two to integrate their respective networks; in fact, they can take down redundant towers.

    Let's just pray that doesn't happen.
    Thank you I stand corrected ...however I don't thing the US Gov will allow us to end up with only 2 companies for cell service!

    Take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  15. #95  
    Found it strange that know one has commented on AT&T's announcement on Monday to buy T-Mobile. That kinda leaves Sprint out there all alone know.
  16. jdod's Avatar
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    #96  
    There have been a few comments, about 95 so far, right here:

    http://forums.precentral.net/gsm-nor...e-usa-39b.html

    "I feel another merger a comin!"
    Last edited by ronbo2000; 03/23/2011 at 01:48 AM. Reason: edited: did you ever thought about spammers?
    Sprint since 01/06/99: Sanyo SCP-4500 -> Audiovox PPC-6700 -> Palm Treo 755p -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre 1.4.5 -> Jailbroken iPhone 4s
  17. #97  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    There needs to now be a new start up GSM carrier. That's how T-Mobile US started out, VoiceSteam. There are small CDMA carrier alternatives should Verizon buy up Sprint. But no GSM offerings except Cincinnati Bell, but they are obviously local. T-Mobile snatched up another small GSM carrier a while ago.

    Buying up the competition, why is this even allowed? Even though this is a capitalist society, why aren't there more safeguards in place for consumers?? But it took the US about 80 years, if not more, to break up the first AT&T monopoly, and now it's coming back together again in a different form. So I guess I shouldn't be surprised.
    T-mobile was first OmniPoint - remember the parrot mascot?

    After careful thought, and as a T-Mobiloe customer SINCE OmniPoint in the early 90's, I can tell you that this merger is a BAD idea for consumers, no matter how one looks at it.

    Capitalism is all about greed and profitability - but tempered by competition to keep the players honest - the problem is, instead of "competing", corporations have been guilty of eating up and eliminating their competition, and, the consumers have suffered every single time - that's NOT how its supposed to be.

    It's happened in every industry we know of, and, this is just the latest; the FCC, FTC and SEC should be lining up right now with the DOJ to not only reject this merger, but, seek to break up Verizon and AT&T into smaller companies, like they did with Ma Bell.

    We need 5 - 7 or more major cell phone carriers in the US, not 2 - that's a recipe for price gauging if I've even seen one.

    I suggest everyone contact their congressional reps to voice thier opinions, and quickly - the more silence that there is from the regulators, the more time AT&T has to "grease thier wheels" silently.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  18. #98  
    with this merger, 4 out of 5 subscribers will be with the top two carriers. Monopoly status is approaching.
  19. #99  
    Quote Originally Posted by JimOhara View Post
    Found it strange that know one has commented on AT&T's announcement on Monday to buy T-Mobile. That kinda leaves Sprint out there all alone know.
    well, you will now find it <merged>
  20. #100  
    Verizon Wireless CEO 'not interested' in buying Sprint, won't waste time opposing T-Mobile / AT&T merger -- Engadget

    So ends the hopes/fears of a Verizon/Sprint consolidation. According to Verizon, Sprint is not worth the effort.
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