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  1.    #1  
    Two questions, actually...

    1) On T-Mobile, is it possible to pay the $2.99 for one meg of GPRS transfer, and then just pay-as-you-go? I hate the thought of paying $19.95 just to 'play' with this new stuff.

    2) And in line with the main thrust of my post title... for those of you already using GPRS, how quickly do your megs seem to disappear... especially by context?

    Meaning...

    Does polling for new mail every 5 minutes result in using up a few megs of bandwidth a day?

    Does staying connected to AIM for Palm for a few hours end up guzzling megs of data just from the pinging (not even taking actual chatting into consideration)?

    If you send SMS while connected via GPRS, do you use SMS 'points' or bandwidth?

    Basically, I'm trying to figure out if a 5 meg allotment for a month is a sick joke, or actually useful.

    Not to mention... I'm also suspicious whether I really "need" GPRS services, and whether they'd be all that insanely useful for my casual (read: non-business) needs.

    As a geek, I can't wait to play with GPRS. But as a relatively broke semi-employed guy, the prospect of watching my dollars float into the coffers of T-Mobile just so I can have AIM running in the background... that's pretty unpalatable

    Anyway, your thoughts/opinions/historical usage/monetary donations are welcome

    Regards,
    Adam
    http://smilezone.com/ and http://blog.smilezone.com/
  2. #2  
    I have the $19.95 5 MB plan. I have had it since the Asian patch was released (about two weeks). I am a heavy user. I download email using Treo mail at least every half hour (the maximum automatic setting). I use this for my cororpate email and I get about 100 emails a day. I also use Eudora Mail for another pop account. I have tried using the Web, but find it quite frustrating and slow (even with GPRS), so I do not browse the Web a whole lot.

    I called T-Mobile yesterday and they said that to date I had used just under 3 MBs. So, it looks like I will be at around 6-7 for the month.
  3.    #3  
    So you (or your company) will likely be paying $25-$30 a month for your GPRS'ing of e-mail. Is it worth it?

    I'm able to download dozens of e-mails a day using Basejet and dialup, while just using a handful of minutes and staying well, well within my allotted minutes plan (hence, no extra fees).

    Is GPRS that much more convenient or useful for you, since you find it not that great with the Web? Do you use GPRS for anything other than your e-mail?

    This stuff aside, thanks much for sharing your experience thus far!

    Regards,
    Adam
    http://blog.smilezone.com/ <-- my Blog about life, love, liberty, and stuff
    http://smilezone.com/ <-- my main site with jokes, pics, and more
  4. #4  
    i am a heavy user found that by surfing web through blazer and retreiving e mails in one week I used 4.2 meg had to upgrade my plan
  5. #5  
    You raise valid questions concerning the advantage of GPRS over dial-up data given the cost per MB.

    I am not sure if it is worth it, but much like cell phones when they first appeared on the scene, early users always pay more for the service. With my first mobile phone in the mid 80s, I paid .60 a minute. So, in some sense I understand that being an early adopter of new technology is always expensive. I have little doubt that as all providers get their 3G networks up and running, the cost of the GPRS service will decrease and likely end up in an "all you can eat plan."


    Much like my boradband connection at home, I very much enjoy the "always on" aspects of the service. Indeed, this is as important to me as the speed.

    For example, the other day I was in a meeting and needed my assistant to bring me some information. I merely opened AIM and sent an IM. This took seconds because I did not have to dial in first. Likewise, if I am expecting an email, I can constantly check at no (or little cost) because checking mail sends few packets over the connection.


    In the end it is a matter of personal choice. If $30 a month is a lot of money to you, you should not have this service. Given all the free minutes in the dial up plans, you should stick with that. If, on the other hand, $30 is what you consider a good tip at a restaurant, then it is a worthwhile service today. It is really is a matter of perspective.
  6.    #6  
    Sinman, thanks much for the thoughtful reply!

    And yes, I do think $30 is a nice tip at a restaurant. Just not one that I can justify right now ;-)

    I think you're absolutely right about the early adopter concept. For instance, I waited a while before I got my Treo 180, and I ended up grabbing it for $149 after rebate from Amazon, whereas my friend paid $399 for it not too long ago.

    Of course, the flip side of this is that if we 'medium-adopters' wait and wait and wait, we'll not only be behind the curve, but also miss out on a lot of cool utility in the meantime.

    For instance, my parents still don't have DSL because they "get along fine without it." I try to tell them that, sure, they could get along fine without their microwave, too, but once they get DSL they'll realize how much it improves their life.

    I guess I have not yet been convinced (understandably) that given my current lifestyle (no business traveling, at home in front of my computer a lot, etc.), that GPRS would be that useful for the money for ME.

    Once I'm out and about more (and not just at the gym and Lindy Hop events), I'm confident that $20/$30 a month extra for some major convenience will be a relatively small price to pay.

    Thanks again for your well-written post!

    Regards,
    Adam
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by Simman
    I have the $19.95 5 MB plan. I have had it since the Asian patch was released (about two weeks). I am a heavy user. I download email using Treo mail at least every half hour (the maximum automatic setting).

    I called T-Mobile yesterday and they said that to date I had used just under 3 MBs. So, it looks like I will be at around 6-7 for the month.
    i'm a little confused about the "always-on" aspect of GPRS and i'm hoping somebody can clarify the following (by the way, i am a t-mobile treo 270 owner in nyc who is currently dialing-in to get to email and web):

    - is it true that the maximum automatic setting for checking email is 30 minutes? for me, that would defeat the purpose of the "always-on" benefits of GPRS that many are proclaiming. is there no way to set the automatic setting to a smaller time interval (i.e. 5 minutes)?

    - i was also interested by the bugs reported by several boston and dc area users (i.e. that sometimes the "always-on" feature goes off and needs to be manually reinstated). does anybody know if this is the case for nyc t-mobile users?

    - can anybody tell me what the actual connection speed of GPRS when used on the treo? my dial-up speed is either 9600 or 14.4 - what is GPRS' speed?


    thanks.

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