Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1.    #1  
    If they make a model that can run on the CDMA frequency, I'll buy a Treo.

    I use SprintPCS right now, and looking at the plans that VoiceStream offers (they provide GSM in my area), none of them come close to offering the value that I get with SprintPCS - 350 anytime minutes, 2150 evening/weekend minutes, free long distance - I can call from anywhere on the SprintPCS network to anywhere in the USA with no additional charges. This is only $39.95.

    Compare to VoiceStream's $39.95 northeast neighborhood plan, which would let me make calls only to/from the east coast, and would give me only 600 anytime/1000 night/weekend minutes, or their $39.95 nationwide plan, which would let me make calls to/from anywhere, but would only offer me 300 anytime/300 night/weekend minutes.

    This might be worth it for people who don't travel or call much out of the northeast, but I make calls almost daily out of the area, and frequently travel away from the east coast...

    I suppose if VoiceStream came out with a cheaper plan, I might consider it...

    In regards to GSM's global appeal, I don't travel enough out of the USA to care whether my phone would work overseas.

    The Treo itself looks pretty cool, though. Knowing that a color model is coming out, I'd probably wait for that one, if I was getting one at all.
    [ email: peter@prwdot.org -- web: http://prwdot.org/ ]
  2. #2  
    buddy I think you are out of luck, I don't see a CMDA treo comming....

    You are right in that they chose GSM for the global market...
    Also the treo is software opgradable for the next gen of GSM...(aka GPRS)
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  3. #3  
    This is from the treo faq on handsping's wibsite:

    Q. Will there be a CDMA version of the Treo communicator?
    A. Yes. We are aggressively developing a CDMA version of Treo and will announce it as soon as it's ready.
  4.    #4  
    Originally posted by wforde
    This is from the treo faq on handsping's wibsite:

    Q. Will there be a CDMA version of the Treo communicator?
    A. Yes. We are aggressively developing a CDMA version of Treo and will announce it as soon as it's ready.
    Cool beans. I'd spring for a color CDMA-capable Treo.
    [ email: peter@prwdot.org -- web: http://prwdot.org/ ]
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by wforde
    This is from the treo faq on handsping's wibsite:

    Q. Will there be a CDMA version of the Treo communicator?
    A. Yes. We are aggressively developing a CDMA version of Treo and will announce it as soon as it's ready.
    ToolkiT starts editing his post....

    ToolkiT tells himself: RTFFAQ....
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  6. #6  
    Hello...

    I read first that no treo would not be CMDA then I read that yes "we" are doing it aggressivly. Can someone help me with the WE part? Also I am on Verison in Texas. I think that is a CMDA area.

    I would get a TREO .... if I did not have to pay for 2 plans.

    Where can a read more about the GMS technology?

    Thanks
    Terry
    Austin, Texas
  7. #7  
    If you want to find out more about GSM, you could either look at somewhere like GSM World or visit one of the decent networks that provides GSM services (ie not a US one ) to see what sort of facilities and pricing they offer.

    I'm not deliberately being nasty to the US, but in other countries where GSM is much more developed and has a more competitive market, you will tend to find many more supplementary services and better pricing plans.

    GSM can, for example, do things like 2 lines on one phone, so you can have a business and a personal number. In fact, add a data and a fax number, and you could end up with four phone numbers for one GSM mobile!

    My preferred operator in the UK is Orange; take a look at the range of services they can offer to see what's possible with GSM (and other technologies, I guess, if there's enough competition to make people want to do it).

    Orange UK

    Nigel.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by nwhitfield
    I'm not deliberately being nasty to the US, but in other countries where GSM is much more developed and has a more competitive market, you will tend to find many more supplementary services and better pricing plans.
    Hey dude, it's called "forced standardization" and it's more prevalent in Europe. Interestingly part of the reason for that is that Europe, I believe, joined the cell phone arena later than the U.S. did, so there already were some good systems from which to choose. Here in the U.S. it's always been more proprietary and competitive, with different carriers touting different systems.
    <B>Traveliter</B>/ Lani Teshima. 2000: Blue Vdx. 2001: Vpl. Travel writer, <A href="http://www.mouseplanet.com/lani/">MousePlanet.com</A>
    Publisher/Editor:
    - <B><A href="http://www.pilotlite.org">Pilotlite.org</A></B>: Simplify your travel with a PDA.
    - <B><A href="http://www.travelite.org">Travelite.org</A></B>: Learn how to travel with just your carry-on
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Traveliter
    Hey dude, it's called "forced standardization" and it's more prevalent in Europe. Interestingly part of the reason for that is that Europe, I believe, joined the cell phone arena later than the U.S.
    Yep; and that forced standardisation is why we've ended up way ahead of the US (well, companies like Motorola have contributed too, by making phones so awful that no one wants to buy them and chooses brands like Nokia instead ;-)).

    I'm not sure of the relative dates of cellphone networks, but I remember the UK launch of Vodafone and Cellnet with analogue (TACS) services was somewhere around 1985.

    In other countries, it was a little earlier - in 1981 when sailing in the Baltic, the yacht I was on already had a direct dial telephone. I'm afraid I'm not sure what technology was used on that, but given the seamlessness of operation, it was almost certainly cell-based, unlike the pre-TACS UK system.

    GSM digital services were introduced in the late 80s or early 90s - the second wave of UK GSM networks - the ones using the 1800MHz band - such as Orange, had already launched by the time I bought my flat, which was in 1993.

    Nigel.
  10. #10  
    From Handspring's site--------------
    "Q.Can I transfer my current mobile phone service to my Treo communicator? Can I keep the same phone number I have with VoiceStream or Cingular now?
    A. If your current GSM service provider is VoiceStream Wireless or Cingular Wireless (in California, Nevada, Washington, North Carolina, South Carolina, Eastern Tennessee and Southeastern Georgia only), you can purchase a Treo communicator without a service plan and activate your Treo communicator by removing the SIM card from your current phone and putting it inside your Treo communicator. You can learn more about purchasing a Treo communicator without a service plan here on Handspring.com once Treo communicators are available for shipment. If you own a phone that runs on a different network with other carriers like AT&T, Verizon or Sprint PCS, you will have to purchase your Treo communicator with a service plan from a GSM carrier. "

    Why are they saying this? I live in Texas and have moved my SIM card from phone to phone and never had a problem. I was hoping to do the same thing with the Treo. Can anyone answer this one?
    ________________________
    WayNorth
    waynorth@prodigy.net
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by waynorth
    Why are they saying this? I live in Texas and have moved my SIM card from phone to phone and never had a problem. I was hoping to do the same thing with the Treo. Can anyone answer this one?
    Why are they saying what? According to the HandSpring FAQ you quoted, you _CAN_ move your SIM card from your current GSM phone into the Treo.

    You will have to purchase an unsubsidized, or full price, Treo to do that though. That's going to hurt. I hope that they can come up with some deal for those with current GSM service to get the "with activation" price.

    Scott
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by linuxppcguy
    If they make a model that can run on the CDMA frequency, I'll buy a Treo.

    I use SprintPCS right now, and looking at the plans that VoiceStream offers (they provide GSM in my area), none of them come close to offering the value that I get with SprintPCS - 350 anytime minutes, 2150 evening/weekend minutes, free long distance - I can call from anywhere on the SprintPCS network to anywhere in the USA with no additional charges. This is only $39.95.

    Compare to VoiceStream's $39.95 northeast neighborhood plan, which would let me make calls only to/from the east coast, and would give me only 600 anytime/1000 night/weekend minutes, or their $39.95 nationwide plan, which would let me make calls to/from anywhere, but would only offer me 300 anytime/300 night/weekend minutes.

    This might be worth it for people who don't travel or call much out of the northeast, but I make calls almost daily out of the area, and frequently travel away from the east coast...

    I suppose if VoiceStream came out with a cheaper plan, I might consider it...
    I have Voicestream in Tampa, Florida and I pay $40 / month for 500 anytime minutes and unlimited weekends. All of the minutes include free roaming and free nationwide long distance. The price of the GSM plans isn't my problem. It's the service. Since I signed up with Voicestream, my service has been very spotty. I often have trouble getting any connection at all inside buildings. and when I do get a connection the quality is not wonderful. I like Sprint PCS much better in Tampa.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by linuxppcguy
    If they make a model that can run on the CDMA frequency, I'll buy a Treo.
    <snip>
    Compare to VoiceStream's $39.95 northeast neighborhood plan, which would let me make calls only to/from the east coast, and would give me only 600 anytime/1000 night/weekend minutes, or their $39.95 nationwide plan, which would let me make calls to/from anywhere, but would only offer me 300 anytime/300 night/weekend minutes.
    Where do you live? I'm in Houston and get 500 anytime minutes nationwide and unlimited weekends from VoiceStream for $39.95.
    James Hromadka, TreoCentral Editor
    Houston - EST. 1836

Posting Permissions