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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    The issue is simple.

    • Pre was the best phone on Sprint at that time.
    • Sprint promoted Pre as its flagship phone.
    • Many smartphone hungry Sprint customers bought it.
    • The phone had hardware issues (keyboard, Oreo, Headset, Cracked Screen .....)
    • The Insurance took the hit by customers replacing the Pre on a frequen basis.
    • Palm was dying as a company could not share the loss of Sprint.
    • Palm was slow to fix the issues.
    • Then comes the Evo. Which becomes a super hit.
    • Many Pre Customers jumped to Evo/Epic/....... to Android in general.
    • Sprint said goodbye to HP.


    Why ? The remaining loyal Pre customers might be in hundreds. And Sprint could care less for them. They might be demanding a good chuck of money for the initial loss.

    The issue only changes when they loose like half a million customers to ATT and Verizon for the Pre 3. Which , IMO, is not going to happen.
    While I completely agree with your premise and your arguement -- I completely disagree that anything that requires 10 bullet points is "simple"
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    #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    While I completely agree with your premise and your arguement -- I completely disagree that anything that requires 10 bullet points is "simple"
    How about this

    The Sprint insurance took a hit by replacing the Pres on a frequent basis and more than 90% of Pre owners ( I am just picking a number ) moved to Android.

    The remaining 10% are precentral members. So Sprint won't care about them.
  3. #23  
    Most of the comments here miss the point.

    Sprint is a business. At the end of the day they will do whatever helps their bottom line.
    The past doesn't matter much for this.

    They already can provide their customers with a broad range of Android phones. Having another OS in the mix adds costs. Sales and Support has to be trained and kept up-to-date about devices, bugs, workarounds, apps, etc...
    Inventories and shelf space add additional costs.

    The only real question is - would offering new webos devices retain and add enough customers to justify that additional costs. As long as people opt for carrier over device Sprint has not much to gain by selling the Pre3. It seems that most Sprint Pre customers will switch to Android and stay with Sprint. So what's the motivation for Sprint to sell the Pre3?

    Carriers don't care about phones. They are not in the phone selling business. Phones are a means to an end to them. Everything else is incidental.
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
    dreamcast87 likes this.
  4. #24  
    IMHO the troubles with the pre and what HP is doing now doesn't inspire confidence in their smartphone pre3.

    HP has no idea what it's doing and has contradictory verbal diarrhea. One second HP says "we didn't buy webos to make smartphone" (on that statement alone would you even put a Pre3 on your network) then it's "we will make smartphones" to "we are going to license webos".

    Maybe if HP could pick a plan and execute it then I'm sure Sprint would pick up the pre3. Verizon and att can play around with webos, if the devices are crap it won't seem effect Verizon's or att's image (they have tons of high quality phones/high end phones). If sprint gets hit with a crap phone again, the blogsphere will be afire with "sprint is crapzz, they have no quailty controlz, sprint should have learned the first time". So Sprint has to be cautious and see how the pre3 on other carriers plays out.
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    #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by tholap View Post
    Carriers don't care about phones. They are not in the phone selling business. Phones are a means to an end to them. Everything else is incidental.
    I think the carriers do care about selling phones, why else do they go for various exclusivity deals for the latest phones?

    If they didn't care about phones, we would be able to buy any device from any manufacturer and activate it on any carrier, just like most of Europe does.
  6. #26  
    This whole thread is based on the assumption that it was Sprint that decided not to carry the Pre 3, but we don't know for certain who is responsible or why. We don't even know for certain that Sprint won't eventually get the Pre 3.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    This whole thread is based on the assumption that it was Sprint that decided not to carry the Pre 3, but we don't know for certain who is responsible or why. We don't even know for certain that Sprint won't eventually get the Pre 3.
    It's true. All assumptions and speculations. But based on what little information is available it seems very unlikely that Sprint will offer the Pre3 or any other webos device in the near future.

    HP has an obvious interest in selling through as many channels as possible and also in keeping the existing customers (many of which are on Sprint).
    The only reason I can see why HP would not offer the Pre3 to Sprint is if Verizon or ATT demanded an exclusive deal. In that case the bigger carriers are simply more important to HP.
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by ackthbbft View Post
    I think the carriers do care about selling phones, why else do they go for various exclusivity deals for the latest phones?

    If they didn't care about phones, we would be able to buy any device from any manufacturer and activate it on any carrier, just like most of Europe does.
    They still don't care about the phones per se. They are means to an end.
    A very popular phone like the Iphone or the Droids can bring in customers when people are willing to switch to get that phone and it's not available on the competitions network.

    But it's still all about getting customers for the network - not selling the phones themselves. The phone sales don't help the bottom line much. Most of the revenue is cost (manufacturers get most of the money and sales and marketing involves further costs). The devices might even be subsidized - as long as they bring in 2+ year contracts.
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
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