Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. jdod's Avatar
    Posts
    874 Posts
    Global Posts
    977 Global Posts
       #1  
    My personal opinion is that you should be involved in the net-neutrality discussion to make sure your voice, however you feel, is heard. This is a huge reason why.

    Here is an email I received today from FreePress.net, the Net-Neutrality Save the Internet promoters:

    When we access the Internet on our phones — as more of us do every day — we expect to be able to go wherever we want, whenever we want.

    But a terrible new service plan from MetroPCS — the fifth-largest U.S. mobile phone carrier — is the latest phone industry attack on Net Neutrality. The company is limiting users' ability to access certain websites and services, unless they pay extra for the privilege.

    Free Press just alerted the FCC to this blatant violation of Net Neutrality.

    Please click here to tell the FCC to launch an investigation.

    Here's what MetroPCS’s new pricing scheme looks like:

    • Customers purchasing the most expensive plan will have to pay extra to access Netflix, Skype or any website using “advanced HTML” on their phones.
    • Those with the cheapest data option won't be able to access any of these online services, except for YouTube -- despite its similar data usage.

    It gets worse. MetroPCS’s plans disproportionately affect people of color and urban communities, whom the company recognizes as a major portion of its customer base, and who largely depend on mobile phones to access the Internet.

    There is a way that we can stop MetroPCS's discriminatory practices. Last month, the FCC adopted weak rules that leave mobile Internet users virtually unprotected from these types of abuses, with two big exceptions: They prohibit the blocking of websites and competing video and voice communication applications on mobile phones. Yet that’s exactly what MetroPCS is doing.

    The FCC must now take action to protect the public and enforce these new rules. If the agency does nothing, we could see a domino effect in which larger carriers like AT&T and Verizon introduce their own forms of mobile blocking and discrimination. We can’t let that happen.

    The FCC must take MetroPCS to task before other carriers follow suit. Tell the FCC: Enforce your new rules. Investigate MetroPCS’s outrageous, anti-Net Neutrality practices.

    Mobile Internet users should have the freedom to access any sites or services they want. The FCC must respond to our concerns, protect our online rights and investigate MetroPCS now.

    Thanks,

    Josh Levy
    Online Campaign Manager
    Free Press

    P.S. Have friends with MetroPCS service? Forward this e-mail to them and make sure they sign our letter as well.

    1. "Groups Ask FCC to Investigate MetroPCS for Violating Net Neutrality Rules," National Journal, 1/11/11: Groups Ask FCC To Investigate MetroPCS For Violating Net Neutrality Rules - Tech Daily Dose

    2. "For minorities, New 'Digital Divide' Seen," USA Today, 1/11/11: For minorities, new 'digital divide' seen - USATODAY.com

    3. "Letter Urging the FCC to Investigate MetroPCS," Free Press, 1/11/11: Letter Urging the FCC to Investigate MetroPCS | Free Press
    Sprint since 01/06/99: Sanyo SCP-4500 -> Audiovox PPC-6700 -> Palm Treo 755p -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre 1.4.5 -> Jailbroken iPhone 4s
  2. #2  
    This is the kind of thing that happens when people allow their carriers to do anything they want.


    I can see the "other side's" argument:

    "But they pay much less for xy"

    Who cares.

    Just because the service is good, or cheap, or has the newest shiny pieces of plastic does NOT mean they can do things like this.


    Signed.
  3. jdod's Avatar
    Posts
    874 Posts
    Global Posts
    977 Global Posts
       #3  
    Got another email about this. Today, its MetroPCS. Tomorrow, will Sprint, Verizon or ATT be doing this? You need to get involved, please take a few minutes to read and consider. Here is today's email:

    When we access the Internet on our phones — as more of us do every day — we expect to be able to go wherever we want, whenever we want.

    But a terrible new service plan from MetroPCS — the fifth-largest U.S. mobile phone carrier — is the latest phone industry attack on Net Neutrality. The company is limiting users' ability to access certain websites and services, unless they pay extra for the privilege.

    Free Press just alerted the FCC to this blatant violation of Net Neutrality. (See 1 Below) Please click here to tell the FCC to launch an investigation.

    Here's what MetroPCS’s new pricing scheme looks like:

    • Customers purchasing the most expensive plan will have to pay extra to access Netflix, Skype or any website using “advanced HTML” on their phones.
    • Those with the cheapest data option won't be able to access any of these online services, except for YouTube -- despite its similar data usage.


    It gets worse. MetroPCS’s plans disproportionately affect people of color and urban communities, whom the company recognizes as a major portion of its customer base, and who largely depend on mobile phones to access the Internet. (See 2 below)

    There is a way that we can stop MetroPCS's discriminatory practices. Last month, the FCC adopted weak rules that leave mobile Internet users virtually unprotected from these types of abuses, with two big exceptions: They prohibit the blocking of websites and competing video and voice communication applications on mobile phones. Yet that’s exactly what MetroPCS is doing.

    The FCC must now take action to protect the public and enforce these new rules. If the agency does nothing, we could see a domino effect in which larger carriers like AT&T and Verizon introduce their own forms of mobile blocking and discrimination. We can’t let that happen.

    The FCC must take MetroPCS to task before other carriers follow suit. Tell the FCC: Enforce your new rules. Investigate MetroPCS’s outrageous, anti-Net Neutrality practices.

    Mobile Internet users should have the freedom to access any sites or services they want. The FCC must respond to our concerns3, protect our online rights and investigate MetroPCS now.

    Thanks,

    Josh Levy
    Online Campaign Manager
    Free Press

    P.S. Have friends with MetroPCS service? Forward this e-mail to them and make sure they sign our letter as well.

    1. "Groups Ask FCC to Investigate MetroPCS for Violating Net Neutrality Rules," National Journal, 1/11/11: Groups Ask FCC To Investigate MetroPCS For Violating Net Neutrality Rules - Tech Daily Dose

    2. "For minorities, New 'Digital Divide' Seen," USA Today, 1/11/11: For minorities, new 'digital divide' seen - USATODAY.com

    2. "Letter Urging the FCC to Investigate MetroPCS," Free Press, 1/11/11: Letter Urging the FCC to Investigate MetroPCS | Free Press
    Sprint since 01/06/99: Sanyo SCP-4500 -> Audiovox PPC-6700 -> Palm Treo 755p -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre 1.4.5 -> Jailbroken iPhone 4s
  4. #4  
    I don't have a problem with providers charging tiers for data speeds (like with my wired internet)

    I don't like them profiting off others work by making people pay to acces select services.

    why should they decide what specific data types I can use anymore than who I can call

    if I make a particularly resource intensive call that requires more of a hassle on there end, like a international call, they charge me and it makes sense.

    if I stream from one site and it is costing too much bandwidth charge me too, but don't tell me which sites I can use, instead limit the bandwidth upfront either in my contract or alacart.
  5. #5  
    Recent FCC Net Neutrality rulings excluded certain provisions from applying to wireless carriers:

    What FCC Net Neutrality means for wireless broadband

    They are allowed to deem some apps as too data intensive. They are not allowed to screen out competition to their paid apps.
  6. #6  
    This site has been making the rounds, and worth spreading. It's an easy-to-understand guide of net neutrality that a normal non-techie person could understand. There's a lot of misinformation out there as certain parties are lobbying aggressively to defeat net neutrality, that this is worth showing to your parents/friends/family who are not savvy about these things:

    The Open Internet: A Case for Net Neutrality


    spread it. thx.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by un_designer View Post
    This site has been making the rounds, and worth spreading. It's an easy-to-understand guide of net neutrality that a normal non-techie person could understand. There's a lot of misinformation out there as certain parties are lobbying aggressively to defeat net neutrality, that this is worth showing to your parents/friends/family who are not savvy about these things:

    The Open Internet: A Case for Net Neutrality


    spread it. thx.
    I'm sorry but that is quite biased also. Another side of this coin is that XYZ app comes on board and everyone wants to use it causing bandwidth headaches for all ISPs until they redo their peering to match the new traffic. Meanwhile XYZ founder gets rich without having to pay more than his own ISP for his data pipe.

    It's not as simple as the tutorial tries to make it...
  8. #8  
    Stop being lazy and asking the government to do the hardwork for you. If you don't like it, change carriers. If they all do it, don't subscribe to any carrier. If enough people do it, the carriers will change on their own.
  9. jdod's Avatar
    Posts
    874 Posts
    Global Posts
    977 Global Posts
       #9  
    The reason I got involved was the following scenario:

    1. You have cable with abc, because you don't have a choice (here where we are, its a monopoly, I assume its that way all over the US).

    2. abc has their own VOIP phone service and wants me to buy it.

    3. I don't like the abc version, I much prefer xyz company VOIP.

    4. abc cable decides they will take advantage of their monopoly status and block xyz VOIP and force me to buy abc VOIP, if I want to use VOIP.

    That is not net neutrality in the definition I understand. And its not something I can change carriers to do anything about.

    Believe me, I much prefer less government than more, but in some cases, some companies have to be stopped from unfair practices.

    Its not about being lazy.

    This slice of net neutrality into the mobile space is a small part of what net neutrality is about.
    Sprint since 01/06/99: Sanyo SCP-4500 -> Audiovox PPC-6700 -> Palm Treo 755p -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre 1.4.5 -> Jailbroken iPhone 4s
  10. #10  
    Try this on for size:

    I don't care about the ISP's bandwidth issues - I contract with them for data access and expect NO limitations regarding their service performance as a part of that contract.

    If they don't have the bandwith, that's not my problem: they are the ones who are trying to add more and more customers that clog up thier bandwidth pipes, all in the name of growth for growth sake.

    This is not the way to win customers, but, rather a very effective way to lose them.

    Thank goodness Im on TMobile, but, if they ever try this, Id be gone in a second.

    Very, very foolish path taken by MetroPCS here, without a doubt.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  11. #11  
    advanced HTML huh? Give me a break.

    This is heartbreaking for me. All I see is another company that profits from business the poor and minorities, doing their part in sustaining and worsening the divides that already exist in American Society.

    The mobile market has increasingly been providing people in urban areas with a level of connectivity that they couldn't access/afford previously. It is apparent to me that there are powers that be who are against that progress. Instead of MetroPCS embracing their position as a positive community business leader, they have chosen to travel the all to popular route: exploiting minorites and the poor.

    also, for many, changing carriers isn't always an option for everyone. Price being the most obvious reason. Then there's the prepaid burner option... Which is probably the most exploitive of them all.
  12. #12  
    That's where "Free Press" is wrong.. The FCC said they would not rule on wireless net neutrality, because "Android is 'open.'" So MetroPCS isn't breaking net neutrality.

    Is it unethical/unmoral? YES
    Is it illegal? Unfortunately, NO

    But with a contract provider, they can't just change their terms like that without allowing their clients to get out of the contract ETF-free due to being a "materially adverse" change.
    Arthur Thornton

    Former webOS DevRel Engineer at Palm, HP, and LG
    Former webOS app developer (built Voice Memos, Sparrow, and several homebrew apps and patches)
    Former blogger for webOS Nation and webOS Roundup
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by jdod View Post
    The reason I got involved was the following scenario:

    1. You have cable with abc, because you don't have a choice (here where we are, its a monopoly, I assume its that way all over the US).

    2. abc has their own VOIP phone service and wants me to buy it.

    3. I don't like the abc version, I much prefer xyz company VOIP.

    4. abc cable decides they will take advantage of their monopoly status and block xyz VOIP and force me to buy abc VOIP, if I want to use VOIP.

    That is not net neutrality in the definition I understand. And its not something I can change carriers to do anything about.

    Believe me, I much prefer less government than more, but in some cases, some companies have to be stopped from unfair practices.

    Its not about being lazy.

    This slice of net neutrality into the mobile space is a small part of what net neutrality is about.
    What you're saying is indeed violating net neutrality terms. But wireless providers aren't subject to net neutrality.
    Arthur Thornton

    Former webOS DevRel Engineer at Palm, HP, and LG
    Former webOS app developer (built Voice Memos, Sparrow, and several homebrew apps and patches)
    Former blogger for webOS Nation and webOS Roundup

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions