Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Verizon switching to AT&T-style limited data plans later this month?
    By Chris Ziegler posted Jul 20th 2010 7:24PM

    Verizon switching to AT&T-style limited data plans later this month? -- Engadget

    ExclusiveHang on to your megabytes, folks, because it looks like the Brave New World of limited data is truly upon us. AT&T and Verizon tend to follow each others' moves pretty closely -- the two carriers regard each other as their nearest competitors, after all -- and we're hearing that Big Red intends to move to some sort of tiered bucket strategy on July 29. We don't have details on whether the pricing will be identical to AT&T's ($25 for 2GB, $15 for 200MB), but we imagine it'll be within shouting distance if not. Of course, Verizon has been sending this message for a long time -- even before AT&T was -- so it shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone that this is going down. You might say that Droid Does Caps, eh?
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    I love Sprint.
    I don't understand the purpose of the line, “I don't need to drink to have fun.” Great, no one does. But why start a fire with flint and sticks when they've invented the lighter?

    Let's all give thanks to the app that started it all.
    http://forums.precentral.net/homebre...ebrew-app.html
  3. ltlruss's Avatar
    Posts
    180 Posts
    Global Posts
    181 Global Posts
    #3  
    Saw that... Really gonna have to start watching my usage. I usually double that every month
  4. #4  
    No regrets leaving Big Red last year and now it makes even more sense.
  5. srswarley's Avatar
    Posts
    43 Posts
    Global Posts
    44 Global Posts
    #5  
    I just signed a new contract... (in Apr)

    Curses!
  6. #6  
    Boo! This better not apply to existing customers. That is a material adverse change of contract, which would allow me an escape from the exorbitant ETF. I would leave VZW and Palm forever. Not kidding. This **** makes me mad.
  7. srswarley's Avatar
    Posts
    43 Posts
    Global Posts
    44 Global Posts
    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by pre-fan View Post
    Boo! This better not apply to existing customers. That is a material adverse change of contract, which would allow me an escape from the exorbitant ETF. I would leave VZW and Palm forever. Not kidding. This **** makes me mad.
    It's not Palm's fault. I understand leaving VZW, and if it would allow me (and others) to leave.. I just might consider that....
  8. #8  
    Verizon is famous for being one of the most expensive carriers and this will just add on to the high costs that Verizon users a having to live with. After all a company that charges you $2 Extra For Detailed Bill will not miss an opportunity to stick it to its customers on data plans.
    Palm m130 > Verizon Trēo 650 > Verizon Trēo 755p > Verizon Palm Prē Plus > TouchPad > Verizon Palm Prē 2
    ~ The Future's Just Not What it Used To Be ~
  9. #9  
    I heard that changes in your contract allow you to discontinue it without any penalty. If this is true and VZ does change the contract, could we cancel it, then take advantage of the deals they offer for signing a brand new contract (usually really cheap hardware)?
  10. #10  
    Supposedly $80 for 5 gigs if you need that much. If this is true than that is absolutely ridiculous. I don't get it though, are their networks really hurting that badly that they need to be so stingy on data plans. I don't get why they don't just invest in stronger networks and then lower the cost of data plans. Then make back their money with a larger volume of customers that their network can now handle, instead of just overcharging out the *** to current customers.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by srswarley View Post
    It's not Palm's fault. I understand leaving VZW, and if it would allow me (and others) to leave.. I just might consider that....
    This is, of course, true. But as you'll see in some of my other posts, I've had just as much trouble with Sprint and AT&T - the only other U.S. carriers on which the Pre resides. Perhaps I'd move to T-mobile and get an iPhone - in fact, a new rumor landed today stating that T-mobile gets the iPhone this fall. Plausible (though, in my opinion, unlikely), because T-mobile uses the same network type (GSM) as AT&T.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by canderoc View Post
    I heard that changes in your contract allow you to discontinue it without any penalty. If this is true and VZ does change the contract, could we cancel it, then take advantage of the deals they offer for signing a brand new contract (usually really cheap hardware)?
    Yes, that is correct. The terminology for a change like this would be material adverse change, and that is your escape clause from cell phone contracts. I don't think VZW is quite that stupid, though - most likely, the change would apply solely to new accounts (as it did on AT&T).
  13. #13  
    if i remember it correctly, the OLD unlimited plans of ATT will still be in effect for old subscribers and the new data plans will just be for new subscribers.

    will this be the same case for verizon customers?
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)
  14. #14  
    This is not happening anytime soon, just got off the phone with a friend who ranks up there in vz and his words were comforting. If you are a current customer if and when this takes place you will get what you have been paying for. He also said mhs will remain free for quite some time in the future.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by switchedgear View Post
    This is not happening anytime soon, just got off the phone with a friend who ranks up there in vz and his words were comforting. If you are a current customer if and when this takes place you will get what you have been paying for. He also said mhs will remain free for quite some time in the future.
    Very nice! This got me curious about something: is MHS considered part of the contract, or is it considered an add-on (like a texting package would be)?
  16. #16  
    To answer your question pre-fan when we were getting a pre plus from verizon and asking about mhs and upgrading to a data plan with internet we were told that the mhs was with that plan and the data, so yes its an addon kinda thing like texting even though it automatically shows up on the phone
  17.    #17  
    Hi all,

    Here is an update....

    Take care,

    Jay


    Google and Verizon in Talks on Selling Internet Priority
    By EDWARD WYATT, August 4, 2010

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/te...gewanted=print

    WASHINGTON — Google and Verizon, two leading players in Internet service and content, are nearing an agreement that could allow Verizon to speed some online content to Internet users more quickly if the content’s creators are willing to pay for the privilege.

    The charges could be paid by companies, like YouTube, owned by Google, for example, to Verizon, one of the nation’s leading Internet service providers, to ensure that its content received priority as it made its way to consumers. The agreement could eventually lead to higher charges for Internet users.

    Such an agreement could overthrow a once-sacred tenet of Internet policy known as net neutrality, in which no form of content is favored over another. In its place, consumers could soon see a new, tiered system, which, like cable television, imposes higher costs for premium levels of service.

    Any agreement between Verizon and Google could also upend the efforts of the Federal Communications Commission to assert its authority over broadband service, which was severely restricted by a federal appeals court decision in April.

    People close to the negotiations who were not authorized to speak publicly about them said an agreement could be reached as soon as next week. If completed, Google, whose Android operating system powers many Verizon wireless phones, would agree not to challenge Verizon’s ability to manage its broadband Internet network as it pleased.

    Since the court decision, involving Comcast, in April, the F.C.C. has been trying to find a way to regulate broadband delivery, and that effort has been the subject of a series of private meetings at the agency’s headquarters in recent weeks. At the meetings, officials from the nation’s biggest Internet service and content providers, including Google and Verizon, have tried to reach a consensus on how broadband Internet service should be regulated in light of the decision. Those meetings continued this week, apart from the talks between Google and Verizon.

    The court decision said the F.C.C. lacked the authority to require that an Internet service provider refrain from blocking or slowing down some content or applications, or giving favor to others. The F.C.C. has since sought another way in which to enforce the concept of net neutrality. But its proposals have been greeted with much objection in Congress and among Internet service providers, cable companies and some Internet content producers.

    A spokesman for Verizon said that the company was still engaged in the larger talks to reach a consensus at the F.C.C. and declined to comment on other negotiations. A spokeswoman for Google also declined to comment. While a deal between Google and Verizon would affect only those two companies, it could sway the opinions of lawmakers, many of whom have questioned the wisdom of the F.C.C.’s plans to oversee broadband service.

    At issue for consumers is how the companies that provide the pipeline to the Internet will ultimately direct traffic on their system, and how quickly consumers are able to gain access to certain Web content. Consumers could also see continually rising bills for Internet service, much as they have for cable television.

    The prospect of a Google-Verizon agreement infuriates many consumer advocates, who feel that it would concentrate in a few corporations control of what to date has been a free and open Internet system in which consumers decide which companies are successful.

    “The point of a network neutrality rule is to prevent big companies from dividing the Internet between them,” said Gigi B. Sohn, president and a founder of Public Knowledge, a consumer advocacy group. “The fate of the Internet is too large a matter to be decided by negotiations involving two companies, even companies as big as Verizon and Google.”

    It is not clear that the Google-Verizon talks will result in a deal, or that any agreement would extend beyond those companies. David M. Fish, a spokesman for Verizon, acknowledged the talks, saying, “We’ve been working with Google for 10 months to reach an agreement on broadband policy.”

    But, Mr. Fish added, “We are currently engaged in and committed to the negotiation process led by the F.C.C. We are optimistic this process will reach a consensus that can maintain an open Internet, and the investment and innovation required to sustain it.”

    The F.C.C. process he referred to is what is jokingly called at the agency headquarters “the secret meeting.” At least nine times in the last seven weeks — including Wednesday, with another meeting scheduled for Thursday — a group that includes Google, Verizon, AT&T, Skype, cable system operators and a group called the Open Internet Coalition has met with top F.C.C. officials to discuss net neutrality and the agency’s legal basis for regulating Internet service.

    Cable and telephone companies want free rein to sell specialized services like “paid prioritization,” which would speed some content to users more quickly for a fee. Wireless companies, meanwhile, want no restrictions on wireless broadband, which they see as a different technology than Internet service over wires.

    Many content providers — like Amazon, eBay and Skype — prefer no favoritism on the Internet or they want to be sure that if a pay system exists, all content providers have the opportunity to pay for faster service.

    The F.C.C., meanwhile, favors a level playing field, but it cannot impose one as long as its authority over broadband is in legal doubt. It has proposed a solution that would reclassify broadband Internet service under the Communications Act from its current designation as an “information service,” a lightly regulated designation, to a “telecommunications service,” a category that, like telephone service, is subject to stricter regulation.

    The F.C.C. has said that it does not want to impose strict regulation on Internet service and rates, but seeks only the authority to enforce broadband privacy and guarantee equal access. It also wants to use federal money to subsidize broadband service for rural areas.

    While the F.C.C. is gathering public comment on its reclassification proposal, it has convened the private talks, which are overseen by Edward Lazarus, the chief of staff to Julius Genachowski, the F.C.C.’s chairman.

    The talks have produced some common ground among the participants on smaller matters. But one participant, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the group members agreed not to discuss their deliberations publicly, said there had been little movement “on the few big issues that are the most important.”

    Frustrated with that lack of progress in the last two months, direct talks between Google and Verizon have accelerated, according to people close to the discussions who were not authorized to comment publicly.

    Google and Verizon have their own interests at stake in negotiating separately. The Android operating system from Google is used on many Verizon phones, including the Droid, a competitor to the iPhone from Apple.

    Consumer groups have objected to the private meetings, saying that too many stakeholders are being left out of discussions over the future of the Internet.

    Mr. Lazarus said the meetings “are part of our efforts to identify the best way forward in the wake of the Comcast case to preserve the openness and vibrancy of the Internet.”
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group

Posting Permissions