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  1.    #1  
    " KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Wireless subscribers of Sprint Nextel Corp. may no longer have to buy a new phone if they jump to a new carrier.

    As part of a proposed class-action settlement, the Reston, Va.-based provider, with operational headquarters in Overland Park, Kan., has agreed to provide departing Sprint PCS customers with the code necessary to unlock their phones' software.

    That would allow the phones to operate on any network using code division multiple access technology, or CDMA. Competitors using that technology include Verizon Wireless and Alltel Corp.

    The codes won't work for Sprint's Nextel-branded phones, which use iDEN technology, and don't allow switching to AT&T or T-Mobile, which use global system for mobile communication, or GSM, technology.

    Sprint made the offer as part of the proposed settlement of a California class-action lawsuit, filed last year, accusing the company of anticompetitive practices. The plaintiffs claimed the software "lock" forced anyone wanting to switch carriers to buy a new phone, throwing up a barrier to competition.

    On Oct. 2, an Alameda County Superior Court judge tentatively approved the settlement. It covers customers who bought a Sprint phone between Aug. 28, 1999, and July 16, 2007.

    A final approval hearing hasn't yet been scheduled, said Sprint Nextel spokesman Matt Sullivan.

    "We believe this settlement is fair and reasonable," Sullivan said, adding that the company denies wrongdoing and settled the suit "so we can continue to focus on our business."

    A similar lawsuit filed in Palm Beach County, Fla., is covered by the proposed settlement.

    Sprint doesn't expect to pay any financial damages as part of the settlement, other than possible legal fees, Sullivan said.

    Sprint said it will share the unlocking code with all current and former subscribers once their phones are deactivated and their bills are paid. The company also will add information about the locking software and how to obtain the unlocking codes in the list of terms and conditions of service given to new customers, and instruct its customer service representatives on how to connect a non-Sprint phone to the Sprint network.

    T-Mobile faces a similar class-action lawsuit in California. Users of the iPhone, which is locked to the AT&T network, filed two separate lawsuits last week against the carrier and Apple Inc., claiming its use restrictions and a software upgrade that disables unlocked iPhones constituted unfair business practices."

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071026/..._phone_locking

    Wow this could change a lot!
    Last edited by treoneo; 10/26/2007 at 04:49 PM.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by treoneo View Post
    Wow this could change a lot!
    Perhaps. However, my understanding is that it is more than an "unlock code." First, unless you are moving to Canada or Mexico, there is only one other place to go and that is Verizon, the only other CDMA carrier in the US. Second, if I understand correctly, most of the software in the phone is specific to the carrier. So, it is more than calling Sprint and getting an unlock and calling Verizpn and registering on their network.

    Remember when you took your Sprint phone out of the box? What did the instruction say? Wasn't it "To register, dial 611?" When you dialed 611, who answered? If you "unlock it" and dial 611, who will answer?" If was dialing Sprint before, will simply unlocking it tell it about Verizon? Make it forget Sprint? Or will it leave it an orphan, no Mama, no Papa, and no way to call home?

    The reason that unlocking works with GSM is that all of the carrier specific information is carried on the SIM. Dial 611 with one SIM and you get one carrier. Change SIMs and dial it again and you may get a different carrier.

    The SIM is a truly great idea. Until CDMA gets one, a simple "unlock" is not the same remedy on CDMA as on GSM.
  3.    #3  
    but it does mean any excluseivity sprint has on phones in the future will be null. I can buy a Centro with Sprint & take it to Verizon.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by treoneo View Post
    but it does mean any excluseivity sprint has on phones in the future will be null. I can buy a Centro with Sprint & take it to Verizon.
    Not so fast. Verizon has to first accept that Sprint phone and/or get successfully sued too.
  5. #5  
    Wooow I never thought I would see the day something like this would occur here in the states. So correct me if I'm wrong but this pretty much says I can buy a phone from Verizon, Alltel, or even Telus & get Sprint to activate it on their network correct?
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    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray View Post
    Perhaps. However, my understanding is that it is more than an "unlock code." First, unless you are moving to Canada or Mexico, there is only one other place to go and that is Verizon, the only other CDMA carrier in the US. Second, if I understand correctly, most of the software in the phone is specific to the carrier. So, it is more than calling Sprint and getting an unlock and calling Verizpn and registering on their network.

    Remember when you took your Sprint phone out of the box? What did the instruction say? Wasn't it "To register, dial 611?" When you dialed 611, who answered? If you "unlock it" and dial 611, who will answer?" If was dialing Sprint before, will simply unlocking it tell it about Verizon? Make it forget Sprint? Or will it leave it an orphan, no Mama, no Papa, and no way to call home?

    The reason that unlocking works with GSM is that all of the carrier specific information is carried on the SIM. Dial 611 with one SIM and you get one carrier. Change SIMs and dial it again and you may get a different carrier.

    The SIM is a truly great idea. Until CDMA gets one, a simple "unlock" is not the same remedy on CDMA as on GSM.
    Totally agree the SIM card is awesome- I wish there was a way that cdma phones could work with it or a similar system.

    few things- alltel as well as some other dink carriers and resellers also use cdma. I'd suspect many of them would be more then happy to take anyone even if verizon some how decides not to activate sprint hardware on their network.

    Also remember that it's only been recently that verizon stopped activating sprint phones on their network. People used to hack their sprint treos and put the verizon firmware on it and then get them activated by verizon for years.

    That points out that it is possible to put other images on the phone. Only really helpfull when same phone is carried on the old and new company but it's a possibility.

    And last- those folks that took their sprint phone and put them on verizon figured out the 611 to activate think before. If you put in codes after the number I beleive it finds a particular carrier- but I'd have to search here to find out. THen once it gets reprogrammed it has the correct company in it's brain for the next call to 611.

    So not ideal like GSM and the SIM system but it is a nice incremental start.
  7.    #7  
    why would verizon need to accept it? just call in or program it over the phone. I do remember a bunch of people hacking a sprint treo 700 to work on Verizon. now we don't need the hack...
  8. ceb
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    #8  
    http://internetcommunications.tmcnet...-departing.htm

    Sprint Vows to Unlock Cell Phones
    TMCnet, 10-27-07
    Sprint Nextel Corp. agreed to unlock the cell phones of customers who terminate their subscription to its network following a class-action lawsuit in California. Customers involved in the lawsuit complained that they would be forced to buy new cell phones if they signed contracts with another company. Unlocking cell phones is a current issue for Apple iPhone users, who subscribe to the AT&T network. The users believe locking cell phones to one network constitutes unfair business practices.
    Cheers

    Charles
  9. efudd's Avatar
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by treoneo View Post
    why would verizon need to accept it? just call in or program it over the phone. I do remember a bunch of people hacking a sprint treo 700 to work on Verizon. now we don't need the hack...
    they used to allow that.

    But in the past year or so they changed their system so they will only acitvate ESN's that correspond to verizon branded devices. Check out the threads about moving a sprint 650 to verizon. It used to be as simple as changing the firmware and then calling in. Now you can't.

    I assume part of sprints settlement would require them to accept any cdma esn on their network but not positive.

    probably someone will need to sue verizon next after sprint and att get done.
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    #10  
    from
    http://www.shadowmite.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=785

    Verizon has changed the DMD (Device Master Database) and has locked it down with only thier own ESN numbers. I took off the 650 due to a change and tried to put it back on. They have it on the account, but the system will not accept it to be pushed out to the switches.
    The OP was mucking with a 'verizonized' sprint 650.

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