Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1.    #1  
    Battle of the networks

    Verizon Wireless is composed of numerous smaller companies that joined together when wireless cellular communication first became popular. Sprint PCS, on the other hand, built a digital network — a network of services that uses 1900MHz frequencies — from the ground up and began buying up the largest percentage of the frequency markets offered by the government.

    Seven years ago Sprint spent $5 billion to buy networks with 1900MHZ frequencies, as opposed to the 800MHz analog frequency networks that were common before the government made the change.

    To understand the difference between analog and digital cell phones, Sprint sales manager Robert Orcutt compared the quality to AM and FM radios.

    "The 800MHz networks may be provided over a longer distance but they are not as clear, said Orcutt. "The newer [digital network, as compared to] FM radio, may not reach as broad of a spectrum that the analog can, but it is working from the higher end of the frequencies, so the connection is clearer. Sprint is 100 percent 1900MHz.""

    While Sprint PCS was the first Personal Communication Services player in the market, Verizon is equally programmed to work on networks throughout the United States. However, Sprint PCS works only through its own 1900MHz networks.

    Verizon Wireless is a combination of all networks that have both 800MHz and 1900MHz towers.Verizon has more towers because it owns both the analog and digital towers that date from the older generation of cell phones; nevertheless, the connection is not always as strong since it works from an 800MHz network .

    Both companies own towers throughout the country, creating the unified nationwide network that allows for wireless service nearly anywhere where competitive service is available.

    Verizon Wireless

    Combining old technology with new, Verizon Wireless is programming the phones to work solely on the digital networks. Verizon uses many towers to decrease the odds that the roaming rate will apply, but because the company offers one flat rate, the additional roaming cost is already included into the plan.

    Verizon works on a domestic calling program, offering separate plans that allow the owner to choose the best deal for their lifestyle. The three main options are the Local Digital Choice plan, which covers the South Bend and northern Indiana area; the Regional Single Rate plan, which includes all of the Midwest; and the National Single Rate, which incorporates all of the country.

    The Local Digital Choice plan is designed for customers who plan to call close to home, while the Regional Single Rate is geared toward those who are within driving distance of the home area where the phone is purchased. The National Single Rate works best if the customer plans to talk to people around the country or if they desire domestic roaming in their plan.


    Sprint PCS

    Sprint PCS also offers a great deal of night and weekend minutes to accommodate for calls that are not made during the quieter hours. Sprint has to pay for the towers' power at all times, and since they are used less when it is not prime business hours, the additional minutes are included to increase interest in the nights and weekends. Notre Dame's Sprint PCS network site is always close to capacity during the weekend hours.

    Although the Sprint PCS pricing plans appear to be more appealing to the average bargain-minded college student, the South Bend service area must also be considered. Because Sprint does not own the older towers that Verizon has, local reception is not as good indoors and in more remote locations.

    Sprint does have a better reception when outside buildings, but due to the lack of power, the reception cannot penetrate through walls, making it difficult to call from dorm rooms and classroom buildings.

    Also, as Sprint works only off of 1900MHz frequencies, it cannot pass as easily through metal and concrete. Higher frequencies do not move through walls and concrete as easily as the lower analog frequencies that Verizon uses.

    Putting the sales pitch to the test

    The Verizon Kyocera 2135 cell phone works not only in dorm rooms such as Howard Hall, but also in Debartolo Hall and in the basement of the Huddle. Reception is clear from the Joyce Center, Carroll Hall, South Dining Hall and the library. Essentially, the Verizon cell phone works everywhere on campus with little difficulty or disturbance in the conversation.

    Although the Sprint SPH-N200 phone creates a clearer conversation when it is in use outside of any buildings, it would not work from any indoor locations on campus. The Sprint PCS phone can work from a dorm room when its antenna is out the window, but the service is unpredictable and often goes out before the end of a conversation.

    Looking to the future

    "Sprint is building new networks with new technology," said salesman John Kadletz. "It is the only wireless company that has one network with one technology across the nation."

    Verizon is trying aggressively to make the transition to all digital service, but it is a timely process that will eventually lead them to greater capacity and higher frequencies.

    Until then, however, Sprint PCS is the only all-digital company. In an effort to accommodate even more customers than their current 230 million, the company plans to grow and develop a broader spectrum of service.

    Sprint's coverage area may not currently be as extensive as Verizon's, but both are working towards a more futuristic network that can appease all customers inexpensively.

    Accessorize, accessorize

    Both phone companies have their own perks that entice the customer to choose their plans over another. Sprint and Verizon both offer voice mail, caller ID and the wireless web connection that enables e-mail systems and Internet connections.

    Verizon is also the first company to promote safer driving with cell phones by including ear pieces that enable the driver to talk on their cell phone hands-free. In light of recent laws that have been passed in select states prohibiting the use of handsets while driving, Verizon offers a practical and easy solution.
    Verizon may have better coverage, but if anyone knows me on the forum, I have always contested on Sprints network being a better and more quality network inspite being smaller. Verizon got a head start when communication first became popular and even though Sprint got a late start, Sprints network will only get better. I think Verizons ambitions on expanding their digital network like Sprint digital coverage is costing Verizon, hence their steep cost for data. I am curious to what others think?
    at&t iPhone3G
  2. #2  
    The Treo is only digital, so the analog does not apply here.
    Kyocera 6035 > Kyocera 7135 > Treo 600 > Treo 650. All Verizon. Sprint Treo 755p, HTC Mogul & Centro
    Unlocked Treo 680 for trips outside Sprint's areas
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by RickMG View Post
    The Treo is only digital, so the analog does not apply here.
    Very true...that is also why Verizon caries a lot of Motorola handsets via analogue implications with them. You get better coverage with VZW with dual mode handsets. VZW needs to upgrade all the old anologue tech in their network. Anologue isn't the best health wise to our nugget in long term effects. Digital phones emit radiation in pulses; the older analog varieties emit continuous waves, hence digital is better and safer.
    at&t iPhone3G
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by RickMG View Post
    The Treo is only digital, so the analog does not apply here.
    I have both a sprint treo 700wx and verizon e815... both are all digital. With the treo I see dropped calls (if the phone rings at all) in my storage area (metal building) and other places... like walmart, and my local gas station (has huge metal roof). My vrz phone never has trouble in these places...

    wish I could rule out the treo since I've not used a treo on verizon, nor have I used a "regular" phone on sprint.

    I really love sprint sero, but I'm starting to think sero does not work for me since I really need to get my phone calls and not have people going directly into voicemail... even when I'm driving in the car. I'm not used to that having been on vrz for at least six years (been with sprint six months).
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  5. #5  
    Well, I said that the Treo is only digital as a response to the long post of why Verizon is better. This is a Treo board, so the analog arguement isn't relevant here.

    As for you getting dropped calls and no service in areas, I have found it quite the opposite since I've switched from Verizon to Sprint so it is probably all dependent on the amount of towers in your area. My wife and I were dropping so many callls on Verizon it wasn't funny. We both had treos. Honestly, in almost two months with Sprint I haven't dropped a call, knock on wood.
    Kyocera 6035 > Kyocera 7135 > Treo 600 > Treo 650. All Verizon. Sprint Treo 755p, HTC Mogul & Centro
    Unlocked Treo 680 for trips outside Sprint's areas
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by RickMG View Post
    Well, I said that the Treo is only digital as a response to the long post of why Verizon is better. This is a Treo board, so the analog arguement isn't relevant here.

    As for you getting dropped calls and no service in areas, I have found it quite the opposite since I've switched from Verizon to Sprint so it is probably all dependent on the amount of towers in your area. My wife and I were dropping so many callls on Verizon it wasn't funny. We both had treos. Honestly, in almost two months with Sprint I haven't dropped a call, knock on wood.
    I wish I had a vrz treo to test... or a regular phone on sprint... then I would know for sure.

    I travel a lot so I've tested both services in a bunch of states... in my home area, sprint does fine, except at the places I mentioned above.

    Many of my dropped calls were of the type that you get a call and it stays connected for 30 seconds, then drops. Many of those were on fringe service areas, were both verizon and sprint have poor coverage... the only problem is that my verizon phone would at least hold the call, even if it sounded like crap and the phone had no bars.

    I may get a cheap sprint "regular" phone and try that... see how it works.

    I can't really complain.... sero is great... wish I could find a way to dump verizon for good...

    You are right about location... if I stayed in my local area all the time I'd be set...
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  7. #7  
    I am currently a VZ treop 700p user and just got a 755p Sprint and running them side by side. I am ticked atyet another VZ delay on the 755p for "testing." The call is MUCH clearer on the 755. There is usually 2 or 3 more bars of service on the sprint, but some roaming as well. Does the 755 have a better receiver??
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    I have both a sprint treo 700wx and verizon e815... both are all digital. With the treo I see dropped calls (if the phone rings at all) in my storage area (metal building) and other places... like walmart, and my local gas station (has huge metal roof). My vrz phone never has trouble in these places...

    wish I could rule out the treo since I've not used a treo on verizon, nor have I used a "regular" phone on sprint.

    I really love sprint sero, but I'm starting to think sero does not work for me since I really need to get my phone calls and not have people going directly into voicemail... even when I'm driving in the car. I'm not used to that having been on vrz for at least six years (been with sprint six months).
    Their is a difference of 800 and 1900mhz. Sprint is on 1900mhz and it is a higher frequency that causes the weak signal in buildings which is stated in my post.
    at&t iPhone3G
  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by rcyphermd View Post
    I am currently a VZ treop 700p user and just got a 755p Sprint and running them side by side. I am ticked atyet another VZ delay on the 755p for "testing." The call is MUCH clearer on the 755. There is usually 2 or 3 more bars of service on the sprint, but some roaming as well. Does the 755 have a better receiver??
    The 755p in other threads has gotten on reception. It does seem to have better and clearer voice reception than the 700.
    at&t iPhone3G
  10. #10  
    as VZ expands, won't they be adding just 1900 towers? so eventually they will both have that issue?
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by rcyphermd View Post
    as VZ expands, won't they be adding just 1900 towers? so eventually they will both have that issue?
    Sprint has all 1900mhz towers they have more EVDO capacity and EVDO is available in more markets than Verizon has available. It takes more towers at this frequency but the result is faster more consistant broadband speeds. I would think this would be the direction Verizon will be heading?

    Verizon
    Verizon has a mix of 800/1900mhz towers. For exclusive 800mhz markets that do have EVDO, performances avgs are lower as there is not as much capacity for EVDO in 800mhz markets.
    at&t iPhone3G
  12.    #12  
    Hence why Verizon Unlimited Data ins't really unlimited when they are giving the Axe to customers for extreme data use, while Sprint data is Unlimited.
    at&t iPhone3G

Posting Permissions