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  1.    #1  
    We are introducing a new addition to our replacement enclosure line, the "dave lite", for the Handspring Visor, Deluxe, and Platinum models. It's a replacement faceplate that works with the OEM plastic bottom case half. Like all our enclosures, it's machined from a billet of 6061 T6 aluminum, and includes the same machined buttons as our standard model. More info at http://www.dave.com.

    Dave Ruigh
    co-founder
    Dave Design
  2. #2  
    cool! When will you make the snap on cover avaible on metal

    When will us prism users be happy?

    ps.. thanx for posting in the appropriate forum!
    -Michael Ducker
    TreoCentral Staff
  3.    #3  
    Our "full version" Visor enclosure has slots in the side for a Palm III style flip cover, though we don't have one available yet (The enclosure is not actually compatible with the stock Palm cover, but uses a similar mounting system). Haven't thought about a snap cover, though it's certainly possible in sheet metal. Don't have an eta on a Prism enclosure or cover yet.

    Thanks,

    Dave

    Originally posted by miradu2000
    cool! When will you make the snap on cover avaible on metal

    When will us prism users be happy?

    ps.. thanx for posting in the appropriate forum!
  4. #4  
    I'm almost positive that Handspring has a CAD of the snap cover. It's in the devleoper section of their site. I know I've seen it before..
    -Michael Ducker
    TreoCentral Staff
  5. #6  
    kick ***!! i want one of those!

    but it's 250 dollars to cover the whole visor ? that's $50 more than i paid for my whole visor.
    all around good guy

    brandon
    drop me a line
  6. #7  
    WHY IS THERE SUCH A DIFFERENCE IN PRICE BETTWEEN THE FRONT PIECE AND THE BACK PIECE. IS THERE THAT MUCH MORE WORK INVOLVED.
    [file:///C|/eyemodule/RICOROSSI/Unfiled/Rico.jpg]
  7. #8  
    Originally posted by ricojrossi
    WHY IS THERE SUCH A DIFFERENCE IN PRICE BETTWEEN THE FRONT PIECE AND THE BACK PIECE. IS THERE THAT MUCH MORE WORK INVOLVED.
    i would think so. the front is just a rectangle with a few holes for screen and buttons. the back has to have the springboard slot (and placeholder, presumably) and the battery case and holder, all which have to fit into place. then there's the stylus silo and the ir window and the reset pin.

    i'm just guessing of course, but i think those things are why there's a price diff.

    mc
  8.    #9  
    Many people have asked about the large price difference between the complete
    case and the top half, and the high cost of our products in general. Take a look
    at the following images on our website, these may give a better idea of what's
    involved in making these cases. The 2 images are of the inside of the top and
    bottom case halves, where most of the machining time is consumed.

    http://www.dave.com/images/visor_top_sim.png
    http://www.dave.com/images/visor_bot.png

    The CAD images pretty much illustrate the difference in complexity, and
    hence machining time. The bottom also requires more secondary machining
    operations, i.e. the stylus hole and slot, IR, snap cover latch, etc. Of course,
    there are also more components, the battery door, 2 battery contact insulators.
    The top has just the button matrix, a rather simple part.

    We've looked at many alternatives for reducing costs, including subcontracting.
    Every local shop we've shown these to has bid well above our current retail
    price. This may partly explain why there is no one else making machined
    PDA cases ;+}

    Dave
  9. #10  
    Couldn't you jsut mold it?
    -Michael Ducker
    TreoCentral Staff
  10.    #11  
    Great question, and one that's generated a bit of lively discussion among
    my metalworking friends.

    A metal case for a PDA could certainly be molded, or diecast. There are a couple
    of issues with castings. First, because of the porosity of cast material, anodizing,
    particularly color anodizing doesn't look very good. Second, It's very difficult to
    get the wall thickness down to the range of our cases, i.e. about 1mm. This kind
    of wall would probably require expensive hot-runner dies, and very carefully
    optimized design to achieve this. The wall could be made thicker, but then our
    case, which already adds an ounce, would become a tank! There is another
    process called Thixomolding, which uses plastic injection molding technology to
    make metal parts. I know very little about this, I've heard it can be cheaper than
    die casting, and I think HP uses this in their Jornada casing. Of course, tooling cost is
    perhaps the biggest problem with any of these processes, We're coming up on
    about our 700th case, and at these volumes, casting probably doesn't make
    economic sense. With higher volume/lower cost, maybe it could work, but I
    think the look and feel of a cast case would not equal a machined one.

    Dave

    Originally posted by miradu2000
    Couldn't you jsut mold it?

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