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  • 2 Post By HeyRadar
  1. HeyRadar's Avatar
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       #1  
    HP should have kept the TouchPad alive. They would have been #2 for sure.

    See source:
    Rnp and dweiums like this.
  2. Semma2's Avatar
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    #2  
    So the 0.4 part was a single 4" tablet? I'm not familiar with that model. I wonder who bought it?
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Semma2 View Post
    So the 0.4 part was a single 4" tablet? I'm not familiar with that model. I wonder who bought it?
    It was 1.4 million tablets over 7 quarters. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! It was supposed to be the most popular Android tablet and Samsung was "moving" millions of them according to our previous discussions on this forum.

    HP should have stuck it out. webOS 3.0.1 was buggy as hell. Almost all .0.1 software is and anyone expecting it not to be is full of themselves. HP fixed most of the problems with 3.0.4 and had great customer service for the cracked speaker issue (I got a new TouchPad in under 24 hours through the mail). If they had stuck it out they could have built a reliable following. Instead they ****ed loyal customers and developers off while scaring away potential customers by dropping the hardware altogether.

    Most of you folks can't even say it was a good business move. Had they produced the first run of TouchPads that they were committed for and let it die off slowly instead of killing it off prematurely, I think they would not have blown the initial 1.2 billion dollar write off they took plus the 25% dump in stock from lost investor confidence. They would still be in the top 5 for tablets fighting with Amazon for the #2 spot.
  4. #4  
    Is anybody really making money in the tablet space except for Apple and Samsung, tho?

    I was reading on Boy genius today that while Samsung only sold 1.4 million tablets, they made 30 percent more money per tablet than they did their phones. They had an average selling price of 460 bucks or so for the tablets.

    Is there anybody else besides Apple selling tablets in any significant number at that price? The Touchpad sure didn't until it was cut to almost a fifth of that. The Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 are sold at cost around $200.

    Not sure it would've made sense to race to the bottom in tablet space just to lose money on each unit sold. I love webOS, but I have yet to hear one plausible scenario where HP could've stuck it out AND somehow not lost billions of dollars more. On another unrelated article on Boy genius today, they said now is the worst time EVER to launch a new smartphone OS, and I agree. Android and iOS are sucking up all of the oxygen.

    I agree. Verizon and Sprint are pretty much all about iPhone and Android. AT&T gives Windows Phone a little love to modest effect. T-Mobile is losing customers and almost irrelevant at this point. Nokia doing the same thing webOS was supposed to do with a lowend and a flagship phone across two carriers sold far less than a million Lumia devices in North America last quarter. Does anyone think a webOS phone or two sold from already-burned carriers would be different.

    Players are exiting this space. Companies are cutting back on models. Carriers are selling LESS devices. Same goes for the tablet space. LG is gone. Motorola's Xyboards are a joke. Playbook is pretty much toast. Very hostile environment right now for non-top tier companies.
  5. #5  
    Didn't they sell 5 million Galaxy Notes in 1quarter? And it's a phablet so it counts
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by k4ever View Post
    It was 1.4 million tablets over 7 quarters. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! It was supposed to be the most popular Android tablet and Samsung was "moving" millions of them according to our previous discussions on this forum.

    HP should have stuck it out. webOS 3.0.1 was buggy as hell. Almost all .0.1 software is and anyone expecting it not to be is full of themselves. HP fixed most of the problems with 3.0.4 and had great customer service for the cracked speaker issue (I got a new TouchPad in under 24 hours through the mail). If they had stuck it out they could have built a reliable following. Instead they ****ed loyal customers and developers off while scaring away potential customers by dropping the hardware altogether.

    Most of you folks can't even say it was a good business move. Had they produced the first run of TouchPads that they were committed for and let it die off slowly instead of killing it off prematurely, I think they would not have blown the initial 1.2 billion dollar write off they took plus the 25% dump in stock from lost investor confidence. They would still be in the top 5 for tablets fighting with Amazon for the #2 spot.
    Apple sold even more and if they did they would have been #3. Get your facts right
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by sebastiannapolitano View Post
    Didn't they sell 5 million Galaxy Notes in 1quarter? And it's a phablet so it counts
    No it doesn't. the note is a b.a.s.t.a.r.d. child made by samsung
  8. #8  
    I think Apple just lost the jury with this revelation.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by boovish View Post
    No it doesn't. the note is a b.a.s.t.a.r.d. child made by samsung
    A very popular b.a.s.t.a.r.d. child then.

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