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  1. TJB
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       #1  
    LONDON (Reuters) - Taiwanese computer maker Acer has urged Microsoft Corp to reconsider its planned venture into the tablet market, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday.

    Acer Chairman and Chief Executive J.T. Wang, said Microsoft's plans to launch its own "Surface" tablet in October would be "negative for the worldwide ecosystem" in computing.

    Microsoft's "Surface" tablet would enter the market in direct competition with Acer's "Iconia" or Hewlett-Packard Co's "TouchPad" tablets.
  2. #2  
    Looks like someone isn't familiar with the market, and didn't do their research. Either that or they did some very good research and know something we all don't know about HP's plans. If only that could be true.
  3. #3  
    The only way Microsoft could compete with the TP is to unceremoniously dumping it faster than HP ever could.
  4. #4  
    I don't see what's wrong with Microsoft entering the tablet market. Who doesn't want a tablet that they have control over what it can run? I bet a lot of the first apps will be in HTML5 (Enyo 2.0 anyone?), and .NET. As for competition against the TP, well, you could say both are not mainstream operating systems (Windows on tablets is not mainstream), but both had previous versions on different types of devices to work with. But that really doesn't mean much. Microsoft will likely be more persistent than HP in marketing their tablet, since their corporate head is probably more competent than Apotheker.
  5. T-Pad's Avatar
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    #5  
    The biggest advantage of Microsoft's OS is that it is multi-user capable (which set it apart from all other competing systems). No more problems sharing a tablet within the family; no more discussions, who is using the built-in e-mail client and who is using the 3rd party one, ...
    Preł (iPhone 4), TouchPad 32 GB (PlayBook 16 GB)
  6. #6  
    how can microsoft fail at competing with a device only available in limited stock through ebay to the highest bidder?
    Touchpad Keyboard Themes - >> Click Me <<
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    Looks like someone isn't familiar with the market, and didn't do their research. Either that or they did some very good research and know something we all don't know about HP's plans. If only that could be true.
    seems the financial times were making the comparison of partners(Acer and HP) having tablets in the market not the chairman himself
  8. #8  
    this could be a good thing for open webOS though....could be...all in due time
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by bradow View Post
    Hey perhaps MS's tablet will browse the internet with out issues and stream video properly unlike the touch Pad and its crap WebOS os.
    If you feel that way about webOS, I've got a piece of advice for you. Sell your TouchPad while you can still get good money for it, and put the money towards getting something else.

    1saleaday.com has a special offer today on a refurb 16GB 10 inch Toshiba Thrive - $199. It's a good fully loaded tablet - Tegra 2 1Ghz, WiFi, GPS, SD card slot, 2MP and 5MP cameras, HDMI port, bluetooth, it's just a bit bulky and relatively heavy (same weight as the TouchPad). It comes with Honeycomb, but they've now officially started rolling out ICS for it, so your upgrade is supported. Or if you are ok with a 7 inch screen, I tried out the Nexus 7 today and it's pretty sweet. Again, just $199.

    If you've got a 16GB TP in good condition you'll easily get more than halfway to the $199 by putting it on eBay, a 32GB TP will easily get you 75% there. If you've got some accessories to sell with it you might get all the way there.
    Rnp, treodoc755 and Buddy1969 like this.
  10. #10  
    Well I'm hoping that the Surface will run Open webOS. The hardware sounds decent enough - the keyboard cover looks particularly interesting - so we just need to replace Windows with a better OS!
    creepingmee likes this.
  11. #11  
    A Window opportunity for HP webOS Open source is about to open, if MS goes further with the Surface.

    At this time some Microsoft partners are beginning to feel uncomfortable with the Surface tablet announced in June, and might look for new OS opportunities, instead to keep going with Windows 8.

    Acer CEO JT Wang told the Financial Times that Microsoft's plans to launch its own tablet in October would be a "negative for the worldwide ecosystem" in computing and beg the software giant to rethink the move.

    "We have said think it over. Think twice," Wang is quoted as saying. "It will create a huge negative impact for the ecosystem and other brands may take a negative reaction. It is not something you are good at so please think twice."
    Wang went on to suggest that if Microsoft moves ahead with its tablet plans, the Taiwan-based Acer might replace the software giant as a partner.

    "If Microsoft is going to do hardware business, what should we do? Should we still rely on Microsoft, or should we find other alternatives?," he is quoted as saying.

    HP should take advantage of this scenario and target around 24 OEM`s manufacturers worldwide to offer them as soon webOS Open Source 1.0 is ready in September 2012.

    This is a Window opportunity for HP webOS Open Source, if MS goes further with the Surface.

    Original post from the Financial times:
    Acer chief takes aim at Microsoft Surface

    Acer, the world’s fourth largest computer manufacturer by shipments, has attacked Microsoft’s planned move into tablets, highlighting the growing rift between the software company and its former allies among PC makers.

    JT Wang, chairman and chief executive of Acer, said Microsoft’s plans to launch its own “Surface” tablet in October – in direct competition with his company’s Iconia or HP’s TouchPad tablets would be “negative for the worldwide ecosystem” in computing.

    He is the first head of a big PC maker to criticise Microsoft’s move publicly.

    “We have said [to Microsoft] think it over,” he told the Financial Times. “Think twice. It will create a huge negative impact for the ecosystem and other brands may take a negative reaction. It is not something you are good at so please think twice.”

    The criticism is particularly striking because over the past two decades, Microsoft and PC makers have enjoyed a symbiotic relationship.

    Microsoft’s Windows operating system, together with Intel’s processors, provided a standardised, open platform that allowed PC makers to focus on improving hardware. In turn, competition between companies like Acer, Dell and Lenovo drove prices down for consumers and helped spread the use of Microsoft software.

    This model, however, is being disrupted by the rise of smartphones and tablets, spearheaded by Apple’s iPhones and iPads. This prompted Microsoft, which last month announced its first loss as a public company, to market its own Surface tablet as it plays catch up.

    The US company acknowledged the tensions this would create in a recent regulatory filing, where it noted: “Our Surface devices will compete with products made by our OEM [original equipment manufacturer] partners, which may affect their commitment to our platform.”

    Campbell Kan, Acer’s president for personal computer global operations, said the Taiwanese company was debating internally how to respond to the Surface and any further challenges that could arise if Microsoft expands further into hardware.
    “If Microsoft … is going to do hardware business, what should we do? Should we still rely on Microsoft, or should we find other alternatives?,” Mr Kan said.

    This calculus is complicated by the fact that, for now, Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 8 operating system remains PC makers’ best hope for reviving flagging interest and sales in traditional laptops and desktops.

    This year, Acer has guided towards revenue growth of zero to 5 per cent, but Mr Wang said he expects Acer to return to double-digit growth in 2013, powered by a strong array of tablets and ultrabooks, its slender range of laptops.

    Mr Wang was as exuberant about Microsoft’s work on touchscreens in Windows 8, as he was critical about its move into hardware. “The keyboard is still a necessity but touch is becoming a fashion and necessary feature,” he says. “Windows combines the touch and the keyboard. If you don’t have touch you are antique.”
    .
    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/9e522...#axzz22w7ZGzfR
  12. #12  
    Doesn't it strike you odd?
    Microsoft = Software company. Yet they build tabs now.
    HP = Hardware company, yet they make an open source mobile OS

    The world goes a bit crazier every day

    oh and competition to Touchpad? How can you compete with something that's not on the market?
    War doesn't prove who's right, only who's left...
    geekpeter likes this.
  13. #13  
    Putting a workable version of windows on a tablet would be akin to putting a whale in a sardine can. Shoot Puppy linux makes more sense if you just have to have x86.

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