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  • 1 Post By kjhenrie
  1. Hewlett's Avatar
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       #1  
    I have a full thickness crack by the speaker (a club to which I have no desire to belong, but my membership card has arrived). What methods are you using for DIY with some success? My only idea is Crazy Glue applied with a hypodermic. I do not have a particularly deft hand.

    I really don't want to send it in for repair, based on the stories I am reading.

    It does not have to be absolutely invisible. I am thinking it just needs to be secure enough to stop the crack from spreading (if that is possible), or a piece breaking off.
  2. #2  
    If it were mine, I would try your idea. I presume that your Crazy Glue is a similar product to the Super Glue that I have used. - ie a thin liquid that fills a fine crack by capillary action.
    Last edited by johncc; 04/30/2012 at 07:46 PM.
  3. #3  
    Buy a Skinomi Carbon Fiber Skin, its cheap, it looks great, and you will never know the crack was there.
  4. #4  
    Be very careful with Crazy/Super Glue! Off the top of my head, I can see three serious dangers in attempting to repair it yourself:

    1.) Speaker damage! The same capillary action that draws the glue into cracks on contact could easily draw any excess into the speaker (either the coil or the paper cone -- if it is paper). Think of how nasty the speakers sounded when we had the common occurrence of garbled sound in webOS 3.0.4, and expect to hear that for the rest of the TouchPad's life, if even a small drop finds its way to the speaker.

    2.) The glue could make future repairs (like battery replacement) much more difficult, if the glue creates a bond between the back and a component that shouldn't be bonded.

    3.) Any cyanoacrylate glue flows more easily than water. Injecting what may appear to be a drop could be enough of a stream to drip into the electronics of the TouchPad, which would make for a very bad day.

    I agree with the premise that those of us with cracked TouchPads (myself included) should take some action to prevent further damage. I just believe that the safer way to go might be an outer case.

    YMMV
  5. #5  
    Does super glue bond plastic to plastic?
    Also, it just doesn't seem like the surface area of the physical crack would be sufficient to hold the bonded joint long-term.
    It seems like you would super glue some sort of strengthening material (ie paper) across the entire cracked joint making the surface area of the bond bigger.
    Or...the skinomi tech skin accomplishes the same.
  6. #6  
    I repaired a crack on each speaker using a toothpick with a dab of super glue on the tip. I found it easier to trace the crack and control the amount I apply with the toothpick. I pressed down on one side of the crack to create a slight offset and therefore apply the glue between the sides. I practiced on some wax paper to get a feel for it first. I did this a few months back and it seems to be holding up so far.

    I would be nervous applying the glue directly to the crack considering how fast cyanoacrylate flows and how hard it is to control the amount.
    W00sh likes this.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by hewlett View Post
    I have a full thickness crack by the speaker (a club to which I have no desire to belong, but my membership card has arrived). What methods are you using for DIY with some success? My only idea is Crazy Glue applied with a hypodermic. I do not have a particularly deft hand.

    I really don't want to send it in for repair, based on the stories I am reading.

    It does not have to be absolutely invisible. I am thinking it just needs to be secure enough to stop the crack from spreading (if that is possible), or a piece breaking off.
    I don't want to see any threads about trips to the Emergency Room with a hypodermic needle glued to one hand and a TouchPad to the other!
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2 about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  8. #8  
    I have successfully repaired a phone case which has a plastic clip-in shell, where part of the shell broke away, by just butting to pieces together with super glue and leaving for 24 hrs. No reinforcing used.
  9. #9  
    I like Plasti Dip, you can find it at Home depot. Plasti Dip is thick, rubbery and dries fast. It is also reversible which means you can remove it. Not as brittle as super glue. Just put some small slivers of masking tape over speaker grilles, apply sparingly with tooth pick.

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