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  1.    #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by chalx View Post
    I think lawyers should be engaged in Hulu an Netflix mess. If device is capable to run their content without need for an proprietary app, people with paid subscriptions should have right to access that content without being blackmailed.
    I don't understand it either...Somethings just don't seem right.

    On another thought.. this got me thinking.. What does Hulu do to keep it off webos's web browser? I mean how do they know that i'm using a touchpad? ......I don't get it at all.. can't HP/Palm do what they did w/ the Itunes thing when the pre first came out.. Just send out an update that fixes hulu on the touchpad? and say oops? Or what?
  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by dignitary View Post
    Blackmailed? Did Hulu see you kissing someone you shouldn't? You're looking for the word 'extorted' and using it in a completely erroneous sense anyway, since no legal entity would take you seriously if you presented your case to them claiming it. They don't have to support every platform; they choose which ones to support, and the ones that get support are the ones that have the numbers that make it worthwhile. Should they have to build support for Maemo, Tizen, Android 1.x, the new AmigaOS, etc? No, that's just silly talk.

    That's just reality dude, and you're living in a world full of it. Hell, for years Linux didn't even have a Flash player. Think about it.

    As for the iTunes support, Palm got royally jacked by Apple when they showed that Palm was basically masquerading itself as an iPod--a huge security issue--to the people that run the USB standards organization. Unless they wanted a lawsuit that would have knocked them clean the floor and potentially killed webOS--and Palm--early, Palm did the right thing and dropped official support for it.

    As for Touchpad detection on Hulu, that's all part of Flash. They build their player to detect as much about the device accessing it as possible, and decide whether to play it based on that. For each range of devices that Hulu supports, they also have to rewrite contracts with all the studios outlining that support--which also costs money. This is why Hulu on Android only works within an application that requires you pay for a subscription to it. And again, they won't build that app for a platform that has a dwindling number of users and no retail presence. It just won't happen, and no amount of threatening laughable lawsuits is going to make it happen.
    "Dude" thank you for correction, but I think you managed to understand me. To bad we are not all born in US.
    Hulu is in gray area because what they basically are doing is forcing their subscribers to buy specific gear , not based on supported standards, but on their preferences. Would it be legal if HBO or CBS do not want to broadcast their program on LG TV sets? Like, they develop TV recognition software which blocks broadcast if TV set is not supported. I bet that would be ilegal. I mean, why than we have standards and free market? I bet US court at least in one state would think about this behavior because it can be used for unfair business practice, and good way to force some competitors out of the game. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if I understand whole this situation, people with paid subscription to Hulu are not able to access it via browser not because browser is incapable to play content, but because Hulu and Netflix are filtering access not by subscription, but by device mfg ID? On their PCs, those subscribers can access content for which they paid? is touchpad certified by US certification agency? if yes, than why it can't acces content for which this device is certified.
  3. #43  
    I had to hit the 3 at the bottom of the page then expand the screen just to get here, I wish we were a more functional op so the sites would actually respect us. As I've said before, I love this damn OPS but I'm not sure we can get the respect we deserve..I hate the damn Android!
  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by chalx View Post
    "Dude" thank you for correction, but I think you managed to understand me. To bad we are not all born in US.
    Hulu is in gray area because what they basically are doing is forcing their subscribers to buy specific gear , not based on supported standards, but on their preferences. Would it be legal if HBO or CBS do not want to broadcast their program on LG TV sets? Like, they develop TV recognition software which blocks broadcast if TV set is not supported. I bet that would be ilegal. I mean, why than we have standards and free market? I bet US court at least in one state would think about this behavior because it can be used for unfair business practice, and good way to force some competitors out of the game. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if I understand whole this situation, people with paid subscription to Hulu are not able to access it via browser not because browser is incapable to play content, but because Hulu and Netflix are filtering access not by subscription, but by device mfg ID? On their PCs, those subscribers can access content for which they paid? is touchpad certified by US certification agency? if yes, than why it can't acces content for which this device is certified.
    I am not sure I understand what you are talking about.
    HBO is licensed individually to the service providers not the television manufacturers.
  5. #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by LizardWiz View Post
    I am not sure I understand what you are talking about.
    HBO is licensed individually to the service providers not the television manufacturers.
    That is right, you subscribe to a service, but you are not limited to use specific device to consume subscribed content if device is capable to transmit content. If I understand correctly, Touchpad is capable to provide content from Hulu, but Hulu denied service to a touchpad plainly because touchpad is not favored. I have tried to use comparation with TV sets, but have obviously failed due limited knowledge of English language. Better comparation would be mobile phones... You still can buy unlocked GSM phone and use it on compatible network. If Hulu is carrier, than they would deny you service regardless of phone specifications and compatibility. It would be based only on favoritism.
    For me it's not hard to imagine that Hulu's move is result of negotiations between Hulu and HP's competition.
  6. #46  
    Nah. These contracts are pretty convoluted, and written specifically to avoid pitfalls of being open ended. Generally, if something is not specifically stipulated, then, it is not allowed. This has generally been the case with mobile in general, it is a huge untapped (for the most part) revenue stream for everybody involved and they do not just give unrestricted access to content...
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