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  1.    #1  
    I recently came close to bricking my TouchPad after a failed installation of Arch Linux. After 4 days of frantic chats with HP webOS support (thanks for putting up with me), scouring the Internet for instructions, reading several wikis, and begging for help in the forums, my TouchPad is finally back to normal.

    Actually it is better than normal. I have noticed that it is a lot faster, especially web browsing, has a lot more space available, and has a lost less quirks then it did before. I doctored the latest version of webOS on it (3.0.5) and I can now tell the difference between this build and 3.0.4. I am running the Uberkernel, but I have no performance patches installed and it seems a lot faster than before.

    I think this is because of two reason:

    1) Fresh builds are always better then rolling updates
    2) I've done some bad things to my TouchPad in the past

    I will start with number #2 first. I have installed, then uninstalled two different versions of Linux on my TouchPad (Ubuntu and Arch). I have also installed and uninstalled CM7 at least 4 times (just can't get used to it). These entities have changed the size of my partitions several times and dump configurations files for various apps (CM7-Android) on my media drive. Their uninstall programs don't always do a good job of removing everything and I don't do a good job of tracking exactly how much space I had before and after the install. Over time this has resulting in over a whopping 5 GB of lost space on my device! I will never have an idea of what this was doing to the stability of the device.

    I've installed a boat load of operating systems on many different devices throughout the years. I have installed:

    DOS 3, 5, and 6
    Windows 3, 3.11, 95, 98, ME, XP, 2000, Vista, and 7
    Red Hat Linux Version 5.0 and up
    Mandrake/Mandriva version 7 and up
    PCLinuxOS (up until last year)
    Puppy Linux
    Ubuntu (about every version)
    Linux Mint (last 4 version, using it now)
    Android on multiple devices it wasn't original made for from version 1.6 to 2.3

    What I have learned is that when there is a major update or change to the OS it is best to back up your data, wipe the hard drive clean, and do a fresh install. Rolling updates tend to leave old configuration files that cause issues with newer version of a program. The OS maker also does not take into account that you will actually install a lot of programs on your device (who would do that? ) that may leave files that conflict with the new OS.

    So my advice to the folks who are adventurous or who install a lot of stuff on their devices is every now in then when a new update rolls around you may want to wipe your device clean and start over fresh. You may be pleasantly surprised with the results. What do you folks think?
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by k4ever View Post
    I recently came close to bricking my TouchPad after a failed installation of Arch Linux. After 4 days of frantic chats with HP webOS support (thanks for putting up with me), scouring the Internet for instructions, reading several wikis, and begging for help in the forums, my TouchPad is finally back to normal.

    Actually it is better than normal. I have noticed that it is a lot faster, especially web browsing, has a lot more space available, and has a lost less quirks then it did before. I doctored the latest version of webOS on it (3.0.5) and I can now tell the difference between this build and 3.0.4. I am running the Uberkernel, but I have no performance patches installed and it seems a lot faster than before.

    I think this is because of two reason:

    1) Fresh builds are always better then rolling updates
    2) I've done some bad things to my TouchPad in the past

    I will start with number #2 first. I have installed, then uninstalled two different versions of Linux on my TouchPad (Ubuntu and Arch). I have also installed and uninstalled CM7 at least 4 times (just can't get used to it). These entities have changed the size of my partitions several times and dump configurations files for various apps (CM7-Android) on my media drive. Their uninstall programs don't always do a good job of removing everything and I don't do a good job of tracking exactly how much space I had before and after the install. Over time this has resulting in over a whopping 5 GB of lost space on my device! I will never have an idea of what this was doing to the stability of the device.

    I've installed a boat load of operating systems on many different devices throughout the years. I have installed:

    DOS 3, 5, and 6
    Windows 3, 3.11, 95, 98, ME, XP, 2000, Vista, and 7
    Red Hat Linux Version 5.0 and up
    Mandrake/Mandriva version 7 and up
    PCLinuxOS (up until last year)
    Puppy Linux
    Ubuntu (about every version)
    Linux Mint (last 4 version, using it now)
    Android on multiple devices it wasn't original made for from version 1.6 to 2.3

    What I have learned is that when there is a major update or change to the OS it is best to back up your data, wipe the hard drive clean, and do a fresh install. Rolling updates tend to leave old configuration files that cause issues with newer version of a program. The OS maker also does not take into account that you will actually install a lot of programs on your device (who would do that? ) that may leave files that conflict with the new OS.

    So my advice to the folks who are adventurous or who install a lot of stuff on their devices is every now in then when a new update rolls around you may want to wipe your device clean and start over fresh. You may be pleasantly surprised with the results. What do you folks think?
    I have always known that clean installs are far better. However, I simply don't like the extra work that it entails. I guess you could say that I am lazy. LOL! I, too, have installed many Windows and Linux versions.
    **Intelligence is God given; Wisdom is the sum of our mistakes!**

    As a top contributor to the HP Consumer Support Forums, HP provides me access to the Tochpad at no charge so I may better respond to the questions raised on the Forum.
  3.    #3  
    I have always known that clean installs are far better. However, I simply don't like the extra work that it entails. I guess you could say that I am lazy. LOL! I, too, have installed many Windows and Linux versions.
    I'm the same way. I am now just getting to the point where I do clean installs. I would much rather spend the time up front getting everything right then deal with the time wasted handling instability issues.


    ---Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities (a great webOS app!)
  4. mdram's Avatar
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    #4  
    I didn't do a clean install of 3.0.5 but after installing I've removed all patches except uberkernel and I've noticed a huge performance improvement against .4 unpatched. I'm not sure if I need to patch it al all except for maybe some aesthetic paches.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by mdram View Post
    I didn't do a clean install of 3.0.5 but after installing I've removed all patches except uberkernel and I've noticed a huge performance improvement against .4 unpatched. I'm not sure if I need to patch it al all except for maybe some aesthetic paches.
    This is my experience, also.
    **Intelligence is God given; Wisdom is the sum of our mistakes!**

    As a top contributor to the HP Consumer Support Forums, HP provides me access to the Tochpad at no charge so I may better respond to the questions raised on the Forum.
  6. #6  
    I think that everyone should do a doctor at least once just to know what will/won't happen. Especially BEFORE a something bad happens to know what to expect and to help control the panic during a disaster.

    If you do a lot of installing, modifying or removing, I'd also agree that every once in a while doctoring probably is good advice. One of the biggest advantages of the cloud and cheap USB drives, is that it is much easier to reinstall than it ever has been before.
    Richard Neff

    My tutorials on WebOS development: Beyond 'Hello World!' | Getting Started - WebOS Development

    My apps: Percent Table | SierraPapa
  7. #7  
    K4,

    how did you fix your issue? Your solution may help some others if they end up in trouble...
  8.    #8  
    K4,

    how did you fix your issue? Your solution may help some others if they end up in trouble...
    Check out my thread on the issue:

    http://forums.webosnation.com/hp-tou...s-profile.html

    Quick summary, I used the instructions in the wiki to recreate the partitions on my TouchPad. The wiki was missing some steps which caused the doctor to fail. I found the steps on XDA Developers. I was able to doctor but still couldn't log in. Then I discovered using Impostah that reason I couldn't log in was my serial number was not being reported correctly. I used a patch and Impostah to change it and now everything is good.


    ---Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities (a great webOS app!)

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