Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By ncinerate
  1.    #1  
    I wonder if having a case so that speakers are on top when it is landscape would prevent or lessen chance of the cracking.
  2. #2  
    That would make it hard to adjust the volume, I would think. I've had my TouchPad for 6 months, no cracks. I think if they're going to crack, then they're going to crack regardless of what you do with it. I take mine to work almost daily, dropped it more times than I would have liked, and no cracks.
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2 about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by sledge007 View Post
    That would make it hard to adjust the volume, I would think. I've had my TouchPad for 6 months, no cracks. I think if they're going to crack, then they're going to crack regardless of what you do with it. I take mine to work almost daily, dropped it more times than I would have liked, and no cracks.
    Wish I had your luck! Mine has identical small cracks on the speakers (closer to the middle), and heading towards the screen. Hopefully it doesn't get any worse. I thought I had avoided them, as I've had mine since launch day.
  4. #4  
    Flipping the case around might work, but it sortof defeats the purpose of having speakers as they'd be butted up against the rubber rather than open to the air...

    You'd also have to cut room for the volume controls, headphone jack, and power button. It would look like crap.

    And it might not help.

    I have several touchpads, and even -mine- babied like CRAZY has a nice nasty crack down near the speaker. That happened while in the case, free of abuse. My two and a half year old son's touchpad gets stepped on, dropped, tossed, and generally beat up and it's still crack-free.

    Go figure. I'd say it's not worth worrying about. Worst case scenario you get a tiny crack that is basically invisible with the case on. It won't really effect your ability to use or enjoy the touchpad. Hell, it's so minor I didn't even bother sending mine in for repair (and my crack is almost an inch long into the backing plate). I slapped some clear packing tape on it, put it back into the case, and forgot all about it.
    New to webOS? Here's my definitive Get Started guide: http://forums.webosnation.com/hp-tou...ted-guide.html

    Want to dual boot Android on your Touchpad? Here's my guide: http://forums.webosnation.com/androi...ted-guide.html
    sledge007 likes this.
  5. #5  
    The speaker-port cracks aren't the result of rough handling--I've babied my TP since day one, and still got one crack within the first month.

    Being trained as a mechanical engineer and having some experience with product design and manufacturing processes, here's my guess as to what's going on:
    • The TP's case is molded plastic; it's likely that HP used a molding process that introduces stress patterns into the plastic as it cools (this is very common, BTW). These stress patterns are much more common in curved areas, with the incidence increasing as the radius of the curve decreases.
    • The speaker ports are cut into the case after molding, rather than being part of the molded design (I'm inferring this from the sharp edge of the ports--molded holes would have a slightly rounded edge).
    • When a cut edge in a molded plastic product intersects a stress pattern in the plastic in just the right way, a weak point forms, leading to the possibility (or even the likelihood) of a crack's forming at that point. I'm pretty sure this is what's happening with the TP cases that have developed cracks.

    So why don't all TP cases crack? The distribution of stress patterns in the cooling plastic is random--whether a case develops a crack at a speaker port depends on that specific case's stress pattern. Essentially, it's the luck of the draw.

    The bad design decision on HP's part was to specify that the sound ports be cut into a small-radius curved area of a molded plastic case. They should have either specified a plastic molding process that doesn't introduce the stress patterns or planned on molding in the speaker ports, rather than cutting them out. I'd guess that the former approach might have significantly increased the cost of production, however; I'm not familiar enough with complex molding to even guess what cost impact the latter approach would have had.

    In any case, we're stuck with a poor product design decision. It's one that surprises me more than a little bit, given HP's experience with making plastic cases for small calculators and test equipment.

Posting Permissions