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  1. bnix1963's Avatar
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       #1  
    This is my first post here...

    I wondered whether my tp is protected in any way by default against spyware, trojans, etc.

    Cheers
  2. #2  
    webOS is blessed with the absence of malware - Something that every rare computer system enjoys. Malware only exists for popular systems, where it can have success, just like any other software.
  3. #3  
    That's one of the things that concerns me actually. It's really only a matter of time before some malcontent decides to do TP virus, and if things at webOS are still in their current indeterminate state, the results could be devastating for us users.

    I wonder who we could count on to issue a security patch in a scenario like that? Will HP's webOS unit have enough resources to respond in a timely manner? Do the app developers and homebrew community have access to enough technical details on the internal workings of webOS and it's devices to be able to create anti-spyware, anti-virus, etc? I really dont know.
  4. #4  
    Besides information theft via some unknown web browser drive-by vulnerability or flash, I can't see much of any one spending the time to develop native code viruses for this platform.

    Look at how popular MAC OSX has become and there still aren't that many native malware kits around for it. In the PC space the target remains Windows due to numbers and in mobile it is Android and iOS. The only thing to consider is that there may be cross platform bugs found as all three use webkit for browsers.

    I'd be far more concerned that we get a rock solid build of WebOS before the year is out more so than worry any about malware.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    It's really only a matter of time before some malcontent decides to do TP virus.
    Nope. If you were a virus programmer, you wouldn't bother with a system with so little users.
  6. dsei's Avatar
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    #6  
    I concur that webOS, due to its lack of popularity, will not be a target for malware writers. That said, if support officially ends with known vulnerabilities on the platform, it's something that would drive me away sooner.
  7. #7  
    Is there a firewall available for webOS.

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Daughain View Post
    Is there a firewall available for webOS.

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
    No, there is no need for one.
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2 about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Daughain View Post
    Is there a firewall available for webOS.

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
    if you have a router then you have a hardware firewall.
  10. thurman's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by geekpeter View Post
    if you have a router then you have a hardware firewall.
    I agree
    HP Touchpad 32GB , Treo 650, Treo 600
    webOS 3.0.4
  11. #11  
    As long as I never use a public WiFi. Since I don't always have the luxury of being on my home router, I like options.

    I'm going to guess those responses mean no. Thanks.

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
  12. #12  
    a public wifi will still probably originate from a router, which will again have a firewall, even if it didnt the bulk of nasty stuff floating around the web will affect x86/winblows systems the most.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by sledge007 View Post
    No, there is no need for one.
    Playing around in xterm I see iptables is there - which should mean a firewall can be easily applied. Well, by "easily" I mean - just a matter of knowing how to use iptables, and perhaps how to set up an init script to load them.

    Here is probably more than you would need to know about it: Quick HOWTO : Ch14 : Linux Firewalls Using iptables - Linux Home Networking

    You can ignore the installing part, since iptables is already there.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by geekpeter View Post
    a public wifi will still probably originate from a router, which will again have a firewall, even if it didnt the bulk of nasty stuff floating around the web will affect x86/winblows systems the most.
    ... but it doesn't necessarily protect you from other users on the same public wifi.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by DrPotoroo View Post
    ... but it doesn't necessarily protect you from other users on the same public wifi.
    doubt theres an army of people lurking around public wifi hunting down webOS users specifically, chances of that is pretty staggering.
  16. slash x's Avatar
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    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by bnix1963 View Post
    This is my first post here...

    I wondered whether my tp is protected in any way by default against spyware, trojans, etc.

    Cheers
    If you want protection from "Trojan" ----- buy a different brand of protection
  17. #17  
    A firewall is not a bad idea... just ask the iOS dev who coded one, and the many users who make use of it.

    Certain safety features are inherent in routers because of NAT. The implementation of others, like SPI, goes even further to make routers really safe. To call a router a 'hardware firewall,' however, is stretching it. The cheaper SOHO routers, which are the ones we all use, are hardware w/ firewall features - not necessarily hardware firewalls. They're not all worth their weight (one reason I buy $25 routers and install DD-WRT before use). The more expensive types (Cisco, Netopia/Motorola?) have more sophisticated packet inspection and processing that take them closer to firewalls. [Of course, this is all in general. Things get really complicated and fuzzy w/ other considerations - the implementation of the different layers of the OSI model, for e.g.]

    The point is, given the capabilities and contents of mobile devices today, firewall are a must (even if for a slightly different reason). Total trust can not be given to a router - especially one that you did not configure - and total trust can not be given to a dev who writes an app. Apps can be written to do anything and it's imperative that users know the status of an app on the device/network... is it running? is it initiating a connection? to where? is it receiving a connection? from where? etc.

    It remains to be seen how this particular issue will be viewed and approached as NFC payments and other sensitive uses become commonplace. In any case the implications, like the conclusions, are inescapable. If a software firewall is recommended on personal computers... heck, they're even built by default into every modern OS (XP - 7, OS X, X), then why not on mobile devices which are just as capable?
  18. #18  
    Nice explanation, Palmer.

    If webOS had it's own breed of malware, I'd rather be happy, as that means webOS is popular. In that extremely unprobable case, I'd follow my policy since twenty years in computers, and operate my device with even more love and caution, instead of relying on an antivirus thing that makes people think it's safe to run naked. I'd like to enjoy the feeling of power of the guy that made that firewall app for the iPhone, when he realizes how many people now depend on him.

    Homebrew in webOS is, indeed malware: It can render your device unusable, out of the sheer FUN when you tinker with. Then, you call the Doctor, and everything returns to normal.

    Treat computers nice, whether they live in a noisy server rack, or in your warm pocket. That's all.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by p41m3r View Post
    A firewall is not a bad idea... just ask the iOS dev who coded one, and the many users who make use of it.

    Certain safety features are inherent in routers because of NAT. The implementation of others, like SPI, goes even further to make routers really safe. To call a router a 'hardware firewall,' however, is stretching it. The cheaper SOHO routers, which are the ones we all use, are hardware w/ firewall features - not necessarily hardware firewalls. They're not all worth their weight (one reason I buy $25 routers and install DD-WRT before use). The more expensive types (Cisco, Netopia/Motorola?) have more sophisticated packet inspection and processing that take them closer to firewalls. [Of course, this is all in general. Things get really complicated and fuzzy w/ other considerations - the implementation of the different layers of the OSI model, for e.g.]

    The point is, given the capabilities and contents of mobile devices today, firewall are a must (even if for a slightly different reason). Total trust can not be given to a router - especially one that you did not configure - and total trust can not be given to a dev who writes an app. Apps can be written to do anything and it's imperative that users know the status of an app on the device/network... is it running? is it initiating a connection? to where? is it receiving a connection? from where? etc.

    It remains to be seen how this particular issue will be viewed and approached as NFC payments and other sensitive uses become commonplace. In any case the implications, like the conclusions, are inescapable. If a software firewall is recommended on personal computers... heck, they're even built by default into every modern OS (XP - 7, OS X, X), then why not on mobile devices which are just as capable?
    primary important job of a router is to mask your local computers from the internet from direct access, then the next most important is making sure your ports etc are secure and safe, beyond that any extras are handy but not vital.

    Software firewalls are mostly recommended to people that blindly install/click/run anything presented to them, the same applies to virus checkers (tho their handy regardless), still if your on a home/secure network via your router/wifi theres definatly no chance you need to double up on firewalls with a software one.

    If it got to the stage for some reason you needed to deny certain programs/apps from accessing the net, tbh its more than likely a person has manually installed something bad, and for that a virus/malware checker is more useful.

    Even crap routers do their primary jobs right, dont think ive heard of a single one that goes belly up, any wifi device that does at a guess isnt a proper router and is more than likely a bog standard modem with extra bells and whistles, then yeah that would require a software firewall.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by geekpeter View Post
    Software firewalls are mostly recommended to people that blindly install/click/run anything presented to them
    Isnt that the vast majority of ppl? Our kind can usually take care of ourselves.

    ...the same applies to virus checkers...
    Virii can enter from just about anywhere: the web, mail attachments, an infected flash drive, you name it. Even software distro CD images from legitimate companies manage to get the occasional malware on them before getting burned and shipped out (Sony got their rootkits, Via had their virus-ridden media), so an AV client is not just for the noobs. Anyone can get a virus or compromised by malicious software.

    If it got to the stage for some reason you needed to deny certain programs/apps from accessing the net, tbh its more than likely a person has manually installed something bad...
    True, but it could also mean that a piece of software that they trusted, or just wanted to test, turned out to be the type that tracks, profiles and steal your data. Believe me, we will see more and more of those as the PC gets further relegated to only heavy lifting.

    Besides everything,
    that eager, curious, 4-eyed geek in you... doesn't it have a burning desire to know??

    I say build the firewall. I'd pay a one-time $20 or more for the added peace of mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by jcmarcos
    I'd like to enjoy the feeling of power of the guy that made that firewall app for the iPhone, when he realizes how many people now depend on him.
    He's quite a cool guy, actually. I suggested the webOS port more than a year ago but he didnt bite. I wonder what he'd think now?
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