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  1.    #1  
    Is the Touchpad a Palm or HP product?

    Did Palm start designing it before HP absorbed Palm?
  2. #2  
    palm didn't have money or plans to do tablets. Hp was working on an android tablet before buying Palm.
  3. #3  
    No, the Touchpad is entirely an HP product. Why are you looking in to this?
  4. #4  
    as far as I am concerned, it is a Palm product. From the moment Leo took over, he didn't want webOS to succeed. Palm was never physically absorbed by HP, I still know people that work for Palm. It is a Palm webOS product, HP just funded some operations half heartedly.
    I love physical keyboards... but there is two devices that would make me consider a slab, one is something running a full version of Open webOS. The other is an iPhone!!!! HA HA just kidding (about the iPhone that is)...
  5. LurkerX's Avatar
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    #5  
    No gesture area... HP tablet design co-opted for WebOS after the buyout.
  6. #6  
    My best guess:

    The TP started in early 2010 as a W7 tablet prototype (obviously had a different processor then).
    But Windows was not ready for touch and no competition for IPad or even the coming avalanche of Android devices.

    Then HP bought Palm and immediately dropped the Windows plan.

    TP get's re-purposed to run webos - to get a tablet out ASAP. But the hardware needs some changes - new CPU at least - and probably some other chipset decisions following from that. webos also needed some changes to work on the tablet (webos 3, enyo, mojo emulator, etc...).

    This explains the (otherwise stupid) decision to get rid of the gesture area - even though there is plenty of space in the bezel area. It also explains why many people think that the TP was more designed to compete with the IPad instead of the IPad2.

    Palm perhaps did some brainstorming about tablets, but was way too busy trying to compete with smartphones. They didn't have the resources to try to compete in another device category.

    HP OTOH was primarily interested in the tablet.
    Ironically they ended up building the best webos device ever - the Pre3.

    (Disclaimer: I have no inside information - just guesswork based on limited information)
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
  7. Clay333's Avatar
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    #7  
    unfortunately it is a HP product. I wish HP would just give webOS back to palm if they can't sell it. I know it sounds like a bad decision, but if they can't get any money out of it anyway why not let the people who started it all and had a true passion about webos. I don't see it happening, but I can dream...right? If not giving it to Palm then they should open source it, and let it be the one operating system that is not locked down in anyway at all. I know if it was open source we would have no hardware to run it on, but rooted and bootloader unlocked android phone should work nicely. I would love to see my evo 3d running webOS, don't get me wrong I really like Android, especially with HTC Sense, but it would not even compare to a fully function, fully featured, open source version of webOS. What would truly make my life complete would be the ability to also run all of the Android apps on it, along with the native WebOS apps of course. I understand that none of this is going to happen anytime soon, if ever. I also understand its not nearly as easy as I make it out to be either, mainly because of device variances and things like that.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by clay333 View Post
    I wish HP would just give webOS back to palm if they can't sell it.
    Palm does not exist anymore. HP bought Palm. That entity is gone. That brand is gone. Those Palm people either work for HP now or were fired by HP. But the people that have Webos now are the by and large the same people that had it before, minus anyone fired. But HP would be selling it to themselves.

    Another point though. The reason Palm had to sell out to HP is because they would have gone bankrupt in a few months. So in a fictitious world where Palm exists, you'd be giving WebOS back to a company that would be out of business in mere months.
    You come at the king. You best not miss.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    palm didn't have money or plans to do tablets. Hp was working on an android tablet before buying Palm.
    Cantaffordit is right. The Touchpad is entirely an HP product. It started before HP bought Palm when HP was designing an Android tablet, then they kept that tablet's hardware and launched the Touchpad with webOS after they bought Palm. Palm was nearly bankrupt and struggling to release new phones at that time and was not working on tablets.

    Hopefully the future will be better. Everyone knows Leo messed up with the Touchpad and webOS. Since he is gone now and Meg Whitman is the new HP CEO, there is hope she will do something better with webOS.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    palm didn't have money or plans to do tablets. Hp was working on an android tablet before buying Palm.
    Or is it HP Palm? The webOS-blog from HP is called "HP Palm".
  11. #11  
    Given the hardware issues - I would say its more a palm product than a true HP product- and here, i mean yes, Palm was bought by HP, and was being integrated, and given the mandate to run with the HP slate as webOS vs. WP7, but it just seems like it was a palm product from a hardware & software stand point.

    I'm not sure HP ever really had a chance to absorb and integrate palm. Again - only my personal opinion.
  12. NoICon's Avatar
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    #12  
    Didnt DeWitt state that part of the explanation of the thickness of the device had to do with the incorporation of the Touchstone? If true, this leads me to think it was a Palm design. I dont remember HP having inductive charging...granted it is brilliant and underused in my estimation.
  13. #13  
    I think it was clearly an HP product. Why would Palm release a tablet that required them to rewrite webOS to such a degree? Why would they remove the gesture area--one of the most recognizable features of webOS, perhaps one of the two key GUI elements that differentiated webOS from every other mobile OS? (the other is the cards metaphor)

    No, I think that the TouchPad was an HP product from the beginning--with repurposed hardware, and a mandate to use that (so that no extra development funds needed to be invested)--which also underscores HP's lack of commitment to webOS as a platform.

    More's the pity.
  14. LurkerX's Avatar
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    #14  
    The touchpad looks about as much as a Pre as any other rectangular plastic tablet. Dozens out there just as similar.

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