Results 1 to 12 of 12
Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By UncleVanya
  1.    #1  
    Does it suck up more battery life if I set emails to sync "As Items Arrive" in Gmail?

    Thanks!
  2. #2  
    Test it.

    I'm not trying to be difficult. I can tell you all the theory in the world but I have to admit I have never done any long term testing on this. The problem is there are so many variables in the way that you use your phone I'm not sure what the real answer would be. Try it for a week or two one way and then switch and then switch back and so on until you are convinced which is best. Use tools like Bat Mon and record your results.

    The theory is that depending on the number of emails you get the "as they arrive" option can be more efficient. This is particularly true if you do not get emails frequently - checking hourly for example on an account that gets < 1 email a day.

    The reality is that it also depends on how much other data traffic you have and how frequently your data connection is active - if it's active pretty much off and on all day - then this option isn't likely to harm battery life. If you have few other reasons for data to activate then setting this to daily or every 6 hours might be better.

    Last but not least - if battery life is better one way vs. the other - what is the downside to a delayed email for you? Is there a need to get these "as they arrive" or is an infrequent poll adequate / preferred?
  3. Heist's Avatar
    Posts
    109 Posts
    Global Posts
    153 Global Posts
    #3  
    Yes.
    You're basically setting your device to stay in a "Constant Fetching" mode which is going to tax the battery.
    Blackberry has been the only device to figure out how to have mail Pushed without unduly taxing the battery life but then again, Blackberry was designed at the outset as an intelligent communication device first and foremost.

    Frankly, there's really no reason for anyone to have mail fetching on. If it's critical, the person would probably call or SMS you to check your email. And if it's an email you're waiting for an email, more likely than not, you're checking your email every 10-15 minutes anyway.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Heist View Post
    Yes.
    You're basically setting your device to stay in a "Constant Fetching" mode which is going to tax the battery.
    Blackberry has been the only device to figure out how to have mail Pushed without unduly taxing the battery life but then again, Blackberry was designed at the outset as an intelligent communication device first and foremost.

    Frankly, there's really no reason for anyone to have mail fetching on. If it's critical, the person would probably call or SMS you to check your email. And if it's an email you're waiting for an email, more likely than not, you're checking your email every 10-15 minutes anyway.
    I think you misunderstand how IMAP works (or I do). My understanding is that it keeps an open socket but does not poll. That is not as efficient as the true PUSH model blackberry uses but it's a lot more efficient than a constant poll like what you are describing.

    This topic has been beaten to death many times. Here's another one that talks more about these points:
    http://forums.precentral.net/webos-t...ry-15-min.html
  5. #5  
    Actually, this may not be the same as the Pre; or any other smartphone, for that matter. How does the Touchpad sleep its wifi? Will setting it to "as items arrive" connect it to wifi permanently (this WILL drain battery quite a bit)?

    I have a nook color and even when set to PUSH, it only grabs it when you use it, since the wifi doesn't connect during sleep. The touchpad, however, seems to sporadically connect by itself and retrieve emails.
  6. #6  
    I always have mine set to as items arrive. That was supposed to be the one that saved on the battery when this issue came up with the webos phones. The only thing I've noticed is that after an update, or after a doctor, the setting will show as items arrive, but I've always had to toggle that setting off and back on to prevent battery drain. At least for the phone, I'm not sure if it is the same case for the touchpad, but I did it anyway when my battery life wasnt the same after 3.04.
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  7. #7  
    You can set wifi to be disabled while it's in sleep mode in the wifi settings app
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by FenrirWolf View Post
    You can set wifi to be disabled while it's in sleep mode in the wifi settings app
    If WiFi is set to disabled during sleep, how will the email app grab emails as they arrive?
  9. Daemon's Avatar
    Posts
    796 Posts
    Global Posts
    809 Global Posts
    #9  
    I haven't tested it specifically with the Touchpad but, on my Pre using
    As Items Arrive always used a lot more juice. Many people mistakenly believed
    otherwise, but never bothered to properly test it. Email servers are fundamentally
    about polling (they have no push mechanism), so the only way for a remote device
    to detect incoming messages on the fly is by keeping a connection open to the
    server continuously which means the radio is always on, and that uses more power.
    I regularly get 48-60 hours standby on my original Pre- (original battery)
    with 30 minute polling with 3 active email accounts and significantly
    less, using As Items Arrive. Given that experience, I've no reason to
    change that on the Touchpad.

    ian
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Heist View Post
    Frankly, there's really no reason for anyone to have mail fetching on. If it's critical, the person would probably call or SMS you to check your email.
    Um.... what? I love push email. It basically gives me the instant-communication of SMS without the ridiculous cost (12c to transfer a tiny little packet of information? ha!) Sure I may not NEED it, but that's not the same as having no reason to have it on.
  11. #11  
    Email push doesn't continuously use power. What it does is check to make sure it's still connected to the server every 5-30 minutes (depending on the protocol/server).

    On Sprint/Verizon phones you can tell if the radio is active by looking at the EV/3G icon; white text means active, black text is inactive (standby).

    Setting it to sync every 15+ minutes will probably use less power since it doesn't wake up the phone/tablet every time it gets a new email. "As items arrive" might be more efficient than setting it to sync every 5-10 minutes if you don't get many emails though.
  12. #12  
    It's different for everyone based on use and signal strength. In general I found 'As Items Arrive' to be more efficient then polling every 30 minutes or more often.

    The only way to tell is to test it yourself.

Posting Permissions