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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by LinuxKoss View Post
    QoS will help with the bandwidth you already have, but adding more is always good. Also make sure to use a channel other routers in the area are not all stuck on, or go for the clearest one.
    Agreed, just note as I mentioned above that adding a new wi-fi router won't necessarily increase bandwidth to the internet if that the WAN link is the bottleneck. Like the example above, if you have a cable modem running 10Mbps half duplex, you can upgrade to a new router with Gb LAN and 300Mbps 802.11N wireless links but your Internet connect will still be 10Mbps half duplex.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by h2o826 View Post
    NAS as in the outside storage, how exactly would that work?
    With your usb hdd attached directly to the router the router will then in turn use the network and setup a dlna within your home so you can access anything off the drive from a connected device. ie xbox/ps3 for movies, pc for files, etc. You also have the option to connect remotely. So say you're at school/work and need a file from your house, just hop online a download it. I know net gear has apps for iphone/android so you can upload and download from your phone. Maybe a member here can make a webos app.. just something to keep in mind. Save money and get the added benefits of a newer router...
  3. #23  
    Note that if you really don't care about Tomato or other 3rd party firmware, like Syndil, the refurbished Cisco E2500 which I linked to earlier is a great deal. I just read a post in these forums where someone reported it working great with his touchpad.
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by texasflood View Post
    Agreed, just note as I mentioned above that adding a new wi-fi router won't necessarily increase bandwidth to the internet if that the WAN link is the bottleneck. Like the example above, if you have a cable modem running 10Mbps half duplex, you can upgrade to a new router with Gb LAN and 300Mbps 802.11N wireless links but your Internet connect will still be 10Mbps half duplex.
    Yes you are right. When I said adding more, I was talking about additional bandwidth from the provider.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by h2o826 View Post
    ill take a look at refurbished, i dont want to spend to much $$$. I have WRT54G V8 (w/latest firmware) I am not sure i want to limit the bandwidth, everyone is a heavy data user, i dont want to put a restriction on someone just so i can use it, want everyone to use it freely. Is there another way without limiting everyone?
    Have you tried overclocking it and reducing the TCP/UDP time outs?
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by h2o826 View Post
    ill take a look at refurbished, i dont want to spend to much $$$. I have WRT54G V8 (w/latest firmware) I am not sure i want to limit the bandwidth, everyone is a heavy data user, i dont want to put a restriction on someone just so i can use it, want everyone to use it freely. Is there another way without limiting everyone?

    i tried lookin it up, arent i hardware limited? My transfer rates are based on what the router can traffic and send through?
    As for as QOS, a good implementation like Tomato is very flexible. It is not necessarily limiting folks. I'm on comcast and have very decent download speeds but much less upload bandwitch. As most network communication does some sort of handshaking, if this outbound channel gets overwhelmed then all network traffic suffers. You can't suck in stuff at high speed if the request to send can't get out. So what I use the Tomato QOS for is only to assure fairness on the outbound traffic, it's disabled for my inbound connections, no reason as there is plenty of bandwidth available for my network needs.

    DD-WRT Micro will run on it, which is a bit limited but still gives you many more features than the stock firmware. You are Hardware limited yes. If you're talking about Internet access mostly then it really depends on the speed/throughput of your Internet WAN connection. If your wifi router is faster than the WAN link then upgrading it alone would fix the bottleneck, you'd need to get faster Internet service as well.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by dancom96 View Post
    reducing the TCP/UDP time outs?
    How do you reduce the TCP/UDP time outs?
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by allowingtoo View Post
    How do you reduce the TCP/UDP time outs?
    In DD-WRT like this.
  9. #29  
    To recap:

    If you have network sources inside the house that are slowing down (pc to pc transfers, server inside the house to pc transfers, etc.) and your wired devices are still fast - then you are likely swamping your router's wireless capacity. Moving from 802.11g to 802.11n will help in this respect.

    QoS will also help. Some protocols are friendly and jitter tolerant as well as latency tolerant. File tranfers are an example of this. Some are NOT friendly to specific conditions- VOIP for example wants low jitter - it can tolerate a lot of conditions but prefers to keep the jitter to a minimum to give consistent results. Implementing QoS isn't about slowing anyone down as much as it is about making protocols that are pigs behave and allow those who need more responsiveness to function to be able to do so when bandwidth is limited.

    Splitting the network into multiple access points may help - but getting off G and implementing a dual band N with 2.4 and 5ghz will give you a lot of headroom that is possibly needed. Each of the dual band channels may be able to run dual channel width also - if the neighbors are not too close and not needing the channels this increases the bandwidth again.

    Last but not least - if you are having problems with internet located sources - you may have nothing wrong with your wireless. If you see slowdowns on the wired clients again this may have nothing to do with the wireless - hard to diagnose from here.
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