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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    Where is the better PDF reader? Do you mean the fix of manually changing the rendering values?
    Yeah, that seemed to be the major complaint you hear is the zoom level is terrible. Not a complete fix but I'd say that is the main problem for most (hence why I say 'better'). There are also those under the Ubuntu Chroot.
  2. cgk
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    #42  
    Not a complete fix but I'd say that is the main problem for most (hence why I say 'better').
    I've tried that - it becomes readable but very very slow.

    There are also those under the Ubuntu Chroot.
    That honestly looks a lot of hassle, I looked at some of the instructions and thought it looked too much hard work - at that point, I think most users will simply user another OS entirely...
    DeadVim likes this.
  3. #43  
    haha the irony in that is technically ubuntu is anouther os. It just so happens to run ontop if webOS with a Chroot in this case
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    #44  
    I only need 1 thing - for webOS to be owned and supported by a company that was as passionate about it as this user community.
    DeadVim and Isandunk like this.
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    #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by izzeho View Post
    Yeah, that seemed to be the major complaint you hear is the zoom level is terrible. Not a complete fix but I'd say that is the main problem for most (hence why I say 'better'). There are also those under the Ubuntu Chroot.
    Ubuntu Chroot?

    I don't want to smoke exotic cigars I just want a decent PDF reader

    And an audio engine that doesn't go awol every 10 minutes.
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    #46  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    I've tried that - it becomes readable but very very slow.

    That honestly looks a lot of hassle, I looked at some of the instructions and thought it looked too much hard work - at that point, I think most users will simply user another OS entirely...
    Mate, I'm a techie with 20 years of software development experience (including Unix development and admin) and even I can't be bothered with Ubuntu on the TP.

    I just want a functional efficient experience.
    jdcowboy likes this.
  7. #47  
    1. Bluetooth DUN support
    2. A quicker browser with tabs and plugins
    3. Powered USB? No, rather bluetooth DUN support...
  8. cgk
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    #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by DeadVim View Post
    Mate, I'm a techie with 20 years of software development experience (including Unix development and admin) and even I can't be bothered with Ubuntu on the TP.

    I just want a functional efficient experience.
    I've used ubuntu as well and if that's the answer then the question then becomes for me "where's my android port?"

    I wouldn't pay for many things on the Touchpad but if someone came up with a workable PDF reader....
  9. #49  
    Quote Originally Posted by izzeho View Post
    I'm well aware of all that. You still haven't answered why its necessary when Kalemsoft was no issue playing 1080p videos (in any container) full speed.
    Because your statement was - at best - misleading.

    You implied there is hardware supported video playback for other codecs, there isn't. There is no hardware supported video application other than the included HP video player. As we know, the HP video player is severely limited in its codec support.

    I too have read that Kalemsoft can play many (certainly not all) video codecs at resolutions up to 1080p. Proper playback depends not just on codec support, but also that a video's bitrate is low enough. I can encode a 1080p video with a low enough bitrate to play on decade old machines, or high enough to stall on modern desktops.

    There are other benefits found in hardware supported video.

    Firstly, dedicated hardware will typically be able to play videos at higher resolutions and at higher bitrates.

    Secondly, hardware video playback typically requires fewer system resources and thus can play a video while using far less battery.

    These are not inconsequential benefits.
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    #50  
    pre3
    pre3
    pre3!!!
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