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  1.    #1  
    So like many other TP owners, I very quickly applied all the patches and overclocked my TP to 1.5GHz. From everything I was reading, 1.5GHz was considered very safe because it was sited that the TP actually had a 1.5GHz chip that Hp had "underclocked" to improve battery life.

    I happened to be exploring what the little cap was covering on the lower right side and came across this teardown video:

    HP TouchPad: Teardown and hardware analysis | TechRepublic

    In the video it clearly shows that the main processor is stamped 1.2GHz which matches the HP published specs. While Qualcomm's site states the chip speed is "up to 1.5GHz" it would appear that the standard TPs are using a 1.2GHz version.

    So where did this "underclocked" story come from? While mine is very stable at 1.5 GHz, I just wondered what the real story is.
  2. #2  
    My take: Qualcomm tests CPUs and the output and quality to match the intended frequency. Sometimes some of the CPUs from a batch can't run at the frequency required and they are sold at slower speeds or discarded.

    In this case they likely only tested to make sure the CPUs met the requirements for 1.2Ghz. These very same CPUs could have been sold as 1.5 Ghz with additional testing, likely some of the 1.2ghz batches may not have been able to meet the requirements for 1.5ghz. I would think the vast majority of them would have been able to meet the 1.5Ghz specs... And I'm basing that on absolutely nothing.
  3. #3  
    The same chips are in the 64gb White Touchpad and the 32 GB 4G AT&T Touchpad and they were clocked at 1.5
    In a world of droid, Pre does it better.

    Shouldn't we treat this world like the Garden of Eden and avoid the apple at all costs?
  4. #4  
    Well in interview Josh Topolsky did with Ruby and Dewitt, Ruby talked about "it's about the yield", meaning yeah, they know that it's the same processor in the 16/32 TP and 64 TP but the yield during processor production to run perfectly stable at 1.5 is lower than ones that would run stable at 1.2. Thus they put the 1.2 stable processors in the 16/32 TPs and then reserved the best of breed processors for 1.5...

    That's not to say you can't push the 1.2 stable yields to 1.5 which many of are doing with no problems. And some of us (me) are running them at 1.7, which have been stable for me. I pushed mine to 1.8 and 1.9 but my TP would freeze and reboot.
  5. #5  
    Qualcomm lists the chip as stable up to 1.5ghz.
    I love physical keyboards... but there is two devices that would make me consider a slab, one is something running a full version of Open webOS. The other is an iPhone!!!! HA HA just kidding (about the iPhone that is)...
  6. MincerRay's Avatar
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    #6  
    All new silicon designs are characterized over process, voltage, and temperature. Once characterized, chip manufacturers determine ways to test wafers that correlate to the characterization results. All wafers are slightly different from one batch to the next, and will run at different speeds as a result. Testers will bin the wafers into speed bins. I'm sure the Qualcomm part used in the TP binned at 1.2GHz, but likely not at 1.5GHz. This means that the chip is *guaranteed* to run over all voltage and temperature corners at 1.2GHz, but not guaranteed at 1.5GHz.

    Chip manufacturers and product engineers try to design on the conservative side, especially with high volume consumer goods. They want as much margin as possible. Overclocking a part cuts into this margin. The higher the overclock, the less margin. Also, the hotter a part gets, the slower it can run. When these two curves intersect, the part will become unstable and cause crashes.

    I believe 1.5GHz is safe, unless you are out in the Sahara... :-)
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Gadgetude View Post
    So like many other TP owners, I very quickly applied all the patches and overclocked my TP to 1.5GHz. From everything I was reading, 1.5GHz was considered very safe because it was sited that the TP actually had a 1.5GHz chip that Hp had "underclocked" to improve battery life.

    I happened to be exploring what the little cap was covering on the lower right side and came across this teardown video:

    HP TouchPad: Teardown and hardware analysis | TechRepublic

    In the video it clearly shows that the main processor is stamped 1.2GHz which matches the HP published specs. While Qualcomm's site states the chip speed is "up to 1.5GHz" it would appear that the standard TPs are using a 1.2GHz version.

    So where did this "underclocked" story come from? While mine is very stable at 1.5 GHz, I just wondered what the real story is.
    Hmmm, what the video does show is that the TP is a quality unit that is only a couple ounces heavier than an Ipad 2, and that some thought has gone into replace ability of parts and except for the chouce of OS and lack of apps, was a good buy at the original price and a great buy at the fire sale price. Let the nay sayers eat cow dung.

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