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  1.    #1  
    I want to clear something up, I've been reading a couple of times.

    Just because the "original" Touchpad runs at 1.2 GHz and the new white one runs at 1.5 GHz does not necessarily mean it was underclocked!

    The chip in the Touchpad is/was brand new. So new, it was not publicly announced prior to the "think beyond" event.

    Now, some basic things about processors: not two are the same! The manufacturers offer different models at different speeds for a reason: some chips have defects (parts are disabled => less cache for instance) or can't run stable at higher clocks.

    Why is it important that the chip was brand new? Well, of course Qualcomm can "guess" the clockspeeds based on their design, the information they have from the manufacturer and evaluation samples. The chip inside the Touchpad is probably not made by Qualcomm, but by foundries like TSMC or others. If the chip is brand new the manufacturing is not perfect and design mistakes can result in lower yield.

    Now, Qualcomm probably binned hard to find the 1 in 100 chips that runs 1.5 GHz, just to show "hey, we can do it!". But HP would have had to pay for that binning through the costs of the chips. As production ramps up Qualcomm can randomly pick some chips and bin them. When they see the quality of the chips go up they can bin more easily, the price of the 1.5 GHz SoC decreases.

    In fact, as the demand for the cheaper chips is higher very often chips are binned lower than what they are capable of. That is the reason why many Touchpads can run 1.5 GHz without an issue. But that may not be the case for everyone.

    Now, you probably think back to the original Pre, where the chip was running at 500 instead of 600 MHz. Indeed, there the chip was underclocked to improve the horrendous battery life of the Pre. We know that for a fact because there is no 500 MHz model of the Pre's SoC. For the Touchpad's SoC however, there are 1.2 and 1.5 GHz models available. Consequently, the chips are binned for 1.2 GHz, not underclocked!

    Just something I thought should be mentioned. Note that I don't work in this industry, I just have some knowledge about it. So, if you think I'm wrong, feel free to share your thoughts
  2. #2  
    according to the specs at the wiki page for the Snapdragon chip, the APQ8060 that our Touchpads use, are specced for 1.2Ghz, and the only parts that are in their lineup that are 1.5Ghz are chips that also include the various wireless carrier features. SO, I guess a question is, did they expand the lineup specifically for the 1.5Ghz touchpad, did HP overclock them stock, or are they using one of the wireless carrier chips?
  3. #3  
    If I remember correctly, it's not the 64GB version that has the 1.5GHz, but the HSPA version because of the changeover from the APQ8060 to the MSM8660.
    Palm IIIc -> Sony CLIÉ T650C -> Sony TJ-37 -> Palm TX -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre Bell -> Palm Pre Plus Bell/Verizon Hybrid -> HP Veer -> HP Pre 3 NA -> BlackBerry Classic -> BlackBerry Priv

    It's a Late Goodbye, such a Late Goodbye.

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  4. #4  
    The yield theory is quite valid. Intel for instance, is said to have used the best yields for their Extreme and Xeon variations of LGA1366 processors.

    I also remember when the i7 920 was first released, it was easily overclockable to match (and even exceed) the default clock speeds of the Extreme offerings (minus the unlocked multipliers). People were able to reach 3.3 with no effort and advanced overclockers managed to break the 4GHz barrier (with adequate cooling, of course).

    The later batches (and the i7 930), however, had worse yield quality (intentionally, it seems) and thus were limited in OC. Intel took it a step further with the i7 2nd Gen (Sandy Bridge) by limiting the OC capability of the non-extreme CPU's to 10% only.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToniCipriani View Post
    If I remember correctly, it's not the 64GB version that has the 1.5GHz, but the HSPA version because of the changeover from the APQ8060 to the MSM8660.
    It seems these are the same clock-wise as Qualcomm is stating they should be running at 1.5GHz

    http://www.qualcomm.com/documents/fi...duct-brief.pdf



    "Qualcomm is releasing this hardware and software development board solution for hardware makers wanting to customize their use of Qualcomm's latest Dual-core ARM Processor. The Dragonboard includes a dual-core Snapdragon APQ8060 clocked at 1.5GHz (same as MSM8660 and MSM8260, just without the modem), runs on Android by default. The cost is $300 for a basic unit, and $500 if you want the screen and all the other components featured in this video."
  6. #6  
    I think that you are way over thinking this. A quick check on the processor on qualcomms site shows that it is designed for 1.5 ghz per core.

    Qualcomm Document Center - Snapdragon MSM8x60 / APQ8060 Product Brief

    While the manufacturing process will yield defects, I imagine that the quality control process captures at least the most significant ones. Whatever variances exist between processors is not likely to be 300 mhz. I understand that we are working with materials like silicon which will have differences from chip to chip. But honestly, I think you are putting too much thought into this.
  7. #7  
    lol, musouka and I were tracking on the same page. Just took me longer to compose a thread.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToniCipriani View Post
    If I remember correctly, it's not the 64GB version that has the 1.5GHz, but the HSPA version because of the changeover from the APQ8060 to the MSM8660.
    Both the white 64GB and the 4G are clocked at 1.5GHz.
    Touchscreens are a fad.

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