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  • 1 Post By Cantaffordit
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI. see link.

    take care,

    Jay

    TouchPad Backlash: Retailers Say 'Sorry' For Order Errors
    By David Daw, PCWorld Aug 23, 2011 3:12 PM

    TouchPad Backlash: Retailers Say 'Sorry' For Order Errors | PCWorld

    Barnes & Noble, Amazon.com, and Best Buy are facing a backlash from wannabe HP TouchPad buyers after each of the retailers oversold their supplies of the WebOS-based tablets. B&N is facing the brunt of angry customers with many disgruntled TouchPad bargain hunters taking to social networks to speak their mind.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    yeah, thought I had one coming from B&N too...eventually was cancelled. Not too happy myself.
  3. #3  
    I would think overselling your stock is a fairly common concern in online retail, something you'd want to have a strategy to avoid.
    User of Android, Blackberry OS, WebOS and Windows Mobile (not necessarily in that order).
  4. NSA
    NSA is offline
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    #4  
    I'd imagine they had to know there'd be a demand for these.. but there does generally seem to be a disconnect in big companies from "reality". The fact that HP's website was taking a beating FRIDAY night should have been a good barometer...
  5. #5  
    and between Friday night and Monday/Tuesday morning they cold do what exactly to beef up their systems?

    Websites aren't magic. They have to obey the laws of "physics" as well. If too many people bombard them at once in a very short period of time, no site can handle the strain. Add in a complex inventory update system that has to talk to physical inventory systems...even less likely to handle the strain.

    I don't think people truly understand the scale of how beyond normal "peak times" the past few days has been for these sites.
  6. #6  
    Yea! B&N SUCK!!! They cancel my 3 TouchPads after they charge me for them! Sons of a B....!
    http://forums.webosnation.com/members/stargate-albums-my-pre-picture960-moving-pre.gif
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by porkozone View Post
    I don't think people truly understand the scale of how beyond normal "peak times" the past few days has been for these sites.
    At the very least, they should've disabled their ordering mechanism for the TouchPad when the orders got super heavy to let things cool down rather than risking overselling. That would've annoyed us, sure, but it would've been better than what happened.
    User of Android, Blackberry OS, WebOS and Windows Mobile (not necessarily in that order).
  8. jsabo's Avatar
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by porkozone View Post
    and between Friday night and Monday/Tuesday morning they cold do what exactly to beef up their systems?
    They could have dragged twenty or thirty web servers out of inventory, racked them, mirrored an image from a production machine to the new ones, modified the configs, and added them to the load balancer.

    If they were already clustering the DB, throw two more servers at it and update the cluster. If they weren't, either rush a cluster, or rush a replacement of the current storage with something state-of-the-art out of inventory.

    HP is one of the most popular manufacturers of web serving equipment in the world-- they had the stock sititing on a loading dock somewhere, and they would have been better off ****ing off one guy trying to run some start-up than ****ing off thousands of customers.

    I worked for one of the main movie ticketing sites-- if we could sell 20K tickets/hour back in 2004, HP could have managed to move 100K TPs without crashing over a weekend.

    But they failed to plan for it, then they failed to react to it.
  9. #9  
    yeah, but ticket sales are pretty consistent. Cut the price to 1/4th normal for a day and see what happens
  10. jsabo's Avatar
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    #10  
    No, ticket sales are insanely sporadic.

    First day that you can get tix for the next installment of Star Wars? Massive spike. Holiday weekend? Massive spike. Tuesday morning? No sales whatsoever.

    A week before Xmas we'd move 20-30K tix in a day. Xmas itself? 220K. And this was all 7 years ago, with way crappier hardware.
  11. #11  
    My question in all of this is...did these retailers really have to drop the price over the weekend? Why didn't they wait until Monday when they'd be fully staffed? Newegg still hasn't dropped their price, so apparently retailers weren't forced to do so (and it's looking like anyone who paid full price from them just paid full price, no discount). Maybe it would just be delaying the inevitable over-ordering, but at least online retailers could have taken the time to sit down and decide how to tackle handling it.
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by happyalice View Post
    My question in all of this is...did these retailers really have to drop the price over the weekend? Why didn't they wait until Monday when they'd be fully staffed? Newegg still hasn't dropped their price, so apparently retailers weren't forced to do so (and it's looking like anyone who paid full price from them just paid full price, no discount). Maybe it would just be delaying the inevitable over-ordering, but at least online retailers could have taken the time to sit down and decide how to tackle handling it.
    If they didn't then people would just buy at full price, then demand a refund of the difference...if this wasn't forthcoming then people would send them back. Massive headache.
  13. #13  
    this was HP's plan to anger their channel partners as much as they angered their fan base.
    Rnp likes this.
  14. #14  
    And I understand that...Newegg is going to have the same problem. However, if they hadn't marked them down right away, a LOT of people (myself included) would not have purchased at full price expecting the drop. Maybe this would have equaled fewer unhappy customers. And they still could have used the little bit of extra time to pull in more servers and get a hold on exactly how many of these they had to sell (I'm talking to you Onsale at Amazon). I'm just hoping that this is a lesson to a lot of retailers.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    this was HP's plan to anger their channel partners as much as they angered their fan base.
    Ironic or brilliant? That's my question.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by porkozone View Post
    and between Friday night and Monday/Tuesday morning they cold do what exactly to beef up their systems?

    Websites aren't magic. They have to obey the laws of "physics" as well. If too many people bombard them at once in a very short period of time, no site can handle the strain. Add in a complex inventory update system that has to talk to physical inventory systems...even less likely to handle the strain.

    I don't think people truly understand the scale of how beyond normal "peak times" the past few days has been for these sites.
    Any system worth it's salt should scale horizontally. Add more servers. Even if that isn't possible, there are usually extraordinary measures that can be taken - caching database queries, converting dynamic pages to static, off-loading images to separate servers, disabling targeted ads, and so forth. The specifics are impossible to nail down without actually knowing their architecture.

    And really, how much higher is load compared to "cyber monday", when shoppers are trying to order dozens of deals instead of one. Or the last shipping days before Christmas, when millions of procrastinators are trying desperately to finish holiday shopping?
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    #17  
    I would imagine that overselling is just 'business as usual'; just fill the orders as more stock comes in. But in this case, since there's a limited supply of manufactured units available, and no more will be coming after they're all gone, that they didn't think ahead about this being a problem.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by untitled View Post
    I would think overselling your stock is a fairly common concern in online retail, something you'd want to have a strategy to avoid.
    Sounds like their orderign systems are garbage and only check stock at the start of your order and not at the end as your dealing with payment.

    and yeah im also 1 of teh annoyed 3 sites in the end, went thru to be "cancelled" later after struggling with their dying websites.

    joke.

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