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  1.    #1  
    Hello all,

    I would try to convert my HP Touchpad from its native FAT32 to NTFS like this :

    1. From my PC running Linux, mount the HP Touchpad as USB key, and copy the entire 32GB filesystem to an archive (ex : tar.gz)
    2. Using gparted, re-format the HP Touchpad to NTFS
    3. Restore the files saved at step 1

    Has anyone experienced this ?
    In case it fails, what would be a reliable roll-back method ?

    Regards,
  2. #2  
    AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK $The$ $touchpad$ $won$'$t$ $be$ $able$ $to$ $read$ $anything$ $written$ $on$ $the$ $partition$ $if$ $you$ $did$ $that$.
  3.    #3  
    As the TP is linux-based, I would expect ntfs driver to be built-in the kernel. Isn't it ?
  4. #4  
    NTFS wouldn't be a very good idea, but try exFAT.

    It has a lot of upgrades over Fat32, is compatible with linux, osx, and windows, and also should work 100% on the touchpad, if you can configure the partition structure/etc properly.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by kagbenu View Post
    As the TP is linux-based, I would expect ntfs driver to be built-in the kernel. Isn't it ?
    NTFS is not usually built into the kernel as far as I know, it's a FUSE (FUSE: Filesystem in Userspace) implementation. I really doubt linux is able to boot from a NTFS partition.
    Why do you want to do that?
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by quiestbml View Post
    NTFS wouldn't be a very good idea, but try exFAT.

    It has a lot of upgrades over Fat32, is compatible with linux, osx, and windows, and also should work 100% on the touchpad, if you can configure the partition structure/etc properly.
    exFAT is not compatible with Linux (only proprietary or read-only beta drivers exist). I doubt it would work on the touchpad.

    NTFS might be possible (for the USB drive part only) but is a bit more complicated then written in the first post (at least: load NTFS (FUSE) driver & edit /etc/fstab).
    Psion 3a > Palm IIIx > Sony CLIÉ NR70 > Tapwave Zodiac 2 > Palm Centro > Nokia N900
    > HP Veer & Touchpad
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by digitallysane View Post
    NTFS is not usually built into the kernel as far as I know, it's a FUSE (FUSE: Filesystem in Userspace) implementation. I really doubt linux is able to boot from a NTFS partition.
    Why do you want to do that?
    First: avoid the 4GB limitation, second: improve performance.
  8. #8  
    4GB limitation is a huge flaw...and the only flaw I've encountered so far with the TP. I was eager to be able to load some HD movies on it so I can watch it anywhere on the go. Now, that is out the window. Well, at least it makes me feel better about not purchasing the 32GB TP.

    I hope this gets ameliorated in the future. I know there are smart people out there. I will actually pay for an app/program that can convert the TP into an NTFS standard, or at least eliminate the file size limitation.
  9. #9  
    There's no such thing as only formatting the USB drive partition as NTFS. If you haven't noticed, there's a .palm directory, with files with really long random names. Those files are actually an encrypted filesystem that gets mounted as /media/cryptofs. That filesystem is where all of your apps are actually stored. So by changing the format of the USB partition you'd also be screwing around with your apps partition.

    I'm annoyed by the file size limitation too, but to the best of my knowledge, this is a really, really bad idea.
  10. #10  
    I found it easier to compress the files below 4gb or simply just get the non HD version or a 720 rip since the screen cant do 1080... I find that most 720 x264 movies (that are under 2 hours) hover right around 2-3gb...

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