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  1. #21  
    I believe jamex was referring to the responsiveness of the screen once you're using a running app. The most common phrase among iOS fans and envious webOS users is "buttery-smooth." The coding that enables that is called OpenGL. We have it, but mostly in PDK apps.

    I read an interesting article comparing iOS and Android development here. The salient portion of that article was this:
    ...Which is a long way of saying that everything on iOS is drawn using OpenGL. This is why animation on iOS is so hopelessly fast.
    webOS is fundamentally a browser-based environment. Each card (at least those containing SDK not PDK apps) is a rendered web view of a page written in either the mojo or enyo javascript-based framework. It may be possible for them to turn around and convert that whole rendered page back into an OpenGL surface and give us the buttery animation we crave, but I don't think they're doing it yet.

    However, our web-technology-based UI affords us TONS of flexibility in skinning, homebrewing and rapid development, which I feel is a fair trade-off.
    Palm history: II, IIIc, Kyocera 7135, Treo 650, Centro, Pre, FrankenPre+, (legit) Pre+ & TouchPad.
  2. #22  
    The 3.0.2 build 68 update does NOT address the GPU acceleration. It is my understanding that this is a "huge change" and will take more time to test and implement into ENYO. This is what Kerris has told the developers in the recent Toronto meet up. I have confidence we will see this fix sometime "in the coming months" but not to be confused with the Pre-related "coming months"
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by feltmoney View Post
    The 3.0.2 build 68 update does NOT address the GPU acceleration. It is my understanding that this is a "huge change" and will take more time to test and implement into ENYO. This is what Kerris has told the developers in the recent Toronto meet up. I have confidence we will see this fix sometime "in the coming months" but not to be confused with the Pre-related "coming months"
    Read my post earlier. Also, if you need a better understanding of things and what's been implemented in webOS 3.0, check out https://sites.google.com/a/chromium....ting-in-chrome
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Read my post earlier. Also, if you need a better understanding of things and what's been implemented in webOS 3.0, check out https://sites.google.com/a/chromium....ting-in-chrome
    I think I'll take Richard Kerris' word for it, thanks but he would know the most about this
  5. #25  
    That article is also related to chrome, a windows based browser, not webOS, a linux based mobile operating system. There may be some applicable similarities but the two are as different as night and day
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by feltmoney View Post
    That article is also related to chrome, a windows based browser, not webOS, a linux based mobile operating system. There may be some applicable similarities but the two are as different as night and day
    Actually the webkit engine (that runs apps in webOS) is the same as the WebKit/WebCore engine used in Google Chrome/Apple Safari, and it uses the same hardware acceleration code. You can see this by downloading the Webkit/WebCore open source code from HP/Palm: Open Source Packages - opensource.palm.com - Palm they've been making some modifications to how the GPU acceleration works, but it's fundamentally the same code there.

    Expect further improvements on this over the coming months as Google is also working hard on getting better GPU acceleration into Chrome to compete with Firefox and IE9 Palm can use all this work in webOS as well.
  7. #27  
    I thought the CSS3 added to several apps WAS hardware acceleration.

    I am pretty sure there is a lot of hardware acceleration going on in most of the apps. Maybe not all, but most.
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    #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by kkhanmd View Post
    I know we are very new platform, but kudos to Apple for implementing hardware acceleration years ahead of competition.
    Its great to be able to give other platforms credit where it is due, isn't it ?

    Well, apple choose C/Objective C/whatever which in my limited understanding is FAR FAR easier to accelerate/optimize. Windows Phone uses some .Net/Silverlight so is fairly easy as well.

    I'm not too worried though, I have heard that CSS/HTML are also becoming accelerated nowadays so we should get some nice performance at some point (in the coming months?)
  9. thawkth's Avatar
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    #29  
    It's true that iOS is buttery smooth due to native code and hardware acceleration across the board. It's EASY to code smooth apps for it.


    Android uses a JVM (java virtual machine) of sorts called Dalvik. Much of android's lag issues are due to a lack of hardware acceleration. Android can run things to some degree in native code but it's fairly rare. If you'd like to see a well coded app, install Opera from the market on an android phone - very smooth. Much of Android's speed is due to the insane hardware specs on many new phones and intensive optimization over time. I don't understand why it's not fully GPU accelerated yet, but I'm not a programmer.

    Good news for WebOS/HP is that hardware is getting far more powerful and cost efficient incredibly quickly. Not only that, but HTML5/CSS hardware acceleration is becoming the norm - see Chrome/IE9/Firefox5 - they're all rushing to implement these basic concepts. HP needs to get on this though as consumers respond to lag instinctively.

    We are trained to wait for computers and expect glitches/lag etc. We are NOT happy when any sort of appliance acts the same way. Apple understood this early on, and I really hope HP understands how big a deal it is. Accelerate the apps/ui and make everything stable/smooth and people's view of your product with improve. I guarantee it
  10.    #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by thawkth View Post
    It's true that iOS is buttery smooth due to native code and hardware acceleration across the board. It's EASY to code smooth apps for it.


    Android uses a JVM (java virtual machine) of sorts called Dalvik. Much of android's lag issues are due to a lack of hardware acceleration. Android can run things to some degree in native code but it's fairly rare. If you'd like to see a well coded app, install Opera from the market on an android phone - very smooth. Much of Android's speed is due to the insane hardware specs on many new phones and intensive optimization over time. I don't understand why it's not fully GPU accelerated yet, but I'm not a programmer.

    Good news for WebOS/HP is that hardware is getting far more powerful and cost efficient incredibly quickly. Not only that, but HTML5/CSS hardware acceleration is becoming the norm - see Chrome/IE9/Firefox5 - they're all rushing to implement these basic concepts. HP needs to get on this though as consumers respond to lag instinctively.

    We are trained to wait for computers and expect glitches/lag etc. We are NOT happy when any sort of appliance acts the same way. Apple understood this early on, and I really hope HP understands how big a deal it is. Accelerate the apps/ui and make everything stable/smooth and people's view of your product with improve. I guarantee it
    I know we are very new platform, but kudos to Apple for implementing hardware acceleration years ahead of competition.
    If this helped you hit thanks.
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