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  1. #21  
    Simple. IF HP pushed out a bug update the size of what we get from the homebrew community, most users would slam them for a LACK of fixes.

    Apple does them in chunks, Microsoft does them in chunks, why shouldn't HP?
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by jsabo View Post
    Not to knock the homebrew guys as being sloppy or anything-- the WebOS Internals guys have an amazing track record, and their successes far outweigh their failures-- but they're simply not playing by the same rules as HP.
    As a group of people working in their spare time they can do whatever it is that they feel works best. Because of they're not a publicly traded company, they don't have to be handcuffed by an IT department's interpretation of the various rules that need to be followed in order to be S-OX compliant.
  3.    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by bdhu2001 View Post
    I realized I could be looking at OP's statement incorrectly. OP, what bugs are you talking about? Some of us may be talking about different things instead of the hardware, which is what HP delivers. Can you give us specifics, because no device in history has been launched with absolutely no issues; and some of the issues that people have mentioned about the TouchPad are based on preference and software, not apps. For instance, thickness. The only patch I know of that does something specific that HP controls, that most people have an expectation for, is speed.

    But like one of the other posters stated, that's a patch. The TouchPad being released with AT &T will have more GHz, and that's not a patch.
    I'm talking about the issues that have already been addressed. Per the folks at HP the next update will resolve the majority of issues. My point is why not hold off releasing the TP until those issues could have been resolved. One or two weeks delaying the release won't hurt sales. Now compare that to the approach that's been taking by HP and others. Release something then have reviewers/critics spot out problems, then HP releases a statement saying we are aware of the issues and they will be fixed in two weeks on the official launch. Just seems like an odd approach to selling a product to me.

    I guess the real thing that bothers me is that everyone knows the tablet is a basic computing device. Supposedly not as complex as a netbook, laptop or desktop. Yet it seems the most difficult to create things for it. I don't remember the last time I bought a laptop and the sales person told me cut and paste or flash will be available in 2-3 weeks. Those are just random examples and most of us will laugh at it in the desktop/laptop world. But for some reason in tablets and smartphones it's acceptable.
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dvigilante1 View Post
    How is it that the guys/gals at webosinternals, preware etc are able to spot out bugs, add and enhance features etc in a matter of days when HP with all it's billions and almost two years with webos releases a tablet with issues that could have been easily resolved. I think HP is thinking too big picture which no of us will ever see or get. For example making sure you can print from a tablet. Instead they should start with small things that can be easily fixed. I realize there is an update being released next week but why wasn't that update already in the touchpad at launch?
    What it boils down to is hp has to make sure they don't break anything when they go to fix something else, the homebrew guys have no limitations
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dvigilante1 View Post
    I'm talking about the issues that have already been addressed. Per the folks at HP the next update will resolve the majority of issues. My point is why not hold off releasing the TP until those issues could have been resolved. One or two weeks delaying the release won't hurt sales. Now compare that to the approach that's been taking by HP and others. Release something then have reviewers/critics spot out problems, then HP releases a statement saying we are aware of the issues and they will be fixed in two weeks on the official launch. Just seems like an odd approach to selling a product to me.

    I guess the real thing that bothers me is that everyone knows the tablet is a basic computing device. Supposedly not as complex as a netbook, laptop or desktop. Yet it seems the most difficult to create things for it. I don't remember the last time I bought a laptop and the sales person told me cut and paste or flash will be available in 2-3 weeks. Those are just random examples and most of us will laugh at it in the desktop/laptop world. But for some reason in tablets and smartphones it's acceptable.
    That's not an odd approach at all. As someone already stated, that's not how development works. What may seem to you as a week or two delay is not the same type of delay that is seen on the development side. It takes many processes that rely on one another to complete a formal release of software. You have development, Dry Runs, SCM, Quality, SQA, FQT not to mention budgets, schedules and cost effectiveness of the entire process. It's not just as simple as fixing a line of code and sending it out for release. One single word, line or modification can have a negative impact on code that was already working.

    For example, if a bug is found during FQT (Formal Quality Tests), which is one of the last technical aspects of a formal release (however, many administrative aspects remain) a decision must be made. What type of impact will this bug have on the OS as a whole? According to the plan that is already in place, does fixing it now have any added value?

    So they say lets fix it now:

    -Fix it now (which means that the software must be sent back to development, the developer must reproduce the issue and find a solution for it). While this is taking place, time-lines are shifted, schedules are pushed out, cost effectiveness is again reevaluated and many more things happen that must be taken into account. So after the solution is found and implemented, the entire process begins once again. Dry runs of the software begin once again, Quality begins to take a look at it. SCM logs the current iteration into their systems. FQT is scheduled, SQA must show up and verify the testing once again. All this takes money and manpower and it must be done with cost effectiveness always in the forefront.

    Yes, HP can assign 10,000 engineers to do this but is that really cost effective? Absolutely not. HP is more than just WebOS.


    OR

    -Decide that the bug is a minor one (fix it later with an update):

    This allows for testing to continue, the plan in place continues to meet their milestones. Schedules/Paths are on the continued track. I could continue to list many of the systems/process that happen but I know it's getting boring. Lol

    Needless to say, it's very large process that happens behind the scenes. Finally, lets not forget that HP is a publicly traded company and they have shareholders that request answers for their questions. Shareholders just add to fuel to the volatile but controllable fire.

    Homebrew doesn't need to go through all this. They take the already finished product and modify it to their liking. That's one of the beauties of WebOS. HP doesn't discourage this practice. They encourage it.

    Hope this helps clear things up you.
    Last edited by Achill3s; 07/15/2011 at 11:09 AM.
    Achill3s' Palm Pre: Modded and patched to death!!
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dvigilante1 View Post
    I'm talking about the issues that have already been addressed. Per the folks at HP the next update will resolve the majority of issues. My point is why not hold off releasing the TP until those issues could have been resolved. One or two weeks delaying the release won't hurt sales.
    The problem is, it wouldn't be one or two weeks. Release has already been 2 weeks ago, update could be 2 more weeks out, then the software would need to be loaded on the devices for the early release folks, then released to the public... So now were talking from July 1 to mid august at earliest maybe even September.
    I love physical keyboards... but there is two devices that would make me consider a slab, one is something running a full version of Open webOS. The other is an iPhone!!!! HA HA just kidding (about the iPhone that is)...
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    #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dvigilante1 View Post
    I'm talking about the issues that have already been addressed. Per the folks at HP the next update will resolve the majority of issues. My point is why not hold off releasing the TP until those issues could have been resolved. One or two weeks delaying the release won't hurt sales.
    Just unboxing every TP that was produced would take over 2 weeks by itself.

    Now count the time to update every device, repackage it, readdress all the boxes, etc-- you're looking at September.
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