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  1.    #1  
    I downloaded the product brief for the Qualcomm Snapdragon dual-CPU APQ8060 1.2-GHz processor. According to Qualcomm's specs on the APQ8060 dual core chip it runs at 1.5 GHz! If thats the case then the Touchpad is underclocked? And if thats the case then can we expect Homebrew excellence to get us to 1.5GHz?
    Also, multiple cameras (one at 16 mp) are supported as well as 24 bit screen resolution. These are just a few items listed in Qualcomm's specs that are not utilized to their fullest on the Touchpad.

    Perhaps battery life precludes the Touchpad from taking full advantage of the chip? Am I missing something?

    Sorry for all the questions lol!

    http://www.qualcomm.com/documents/sn...-product-brief
    Last edited by splisskin; 06/27/2011 at 05:47 PM.
  2. #2  
    Same thing happened with Pre, the CPU was underclocked.

    Now, assume the CPU is indeed designed for 1.5GHz, Im sure some third party patch can push it.

    I am not sure, however, is how much benefit it can bring.

    PS. I don't think battery is an issue. High clocking CPU will finish the same task faster, therefore reduce the running time and conserve the battery.
  3. #3  
    It's actually smarter than that - the two processor cores can run at different speeds too. A higher clock speed usually equates to higher power consumption and more heat to lose.

    What is interesting in the spec sheet is that the Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) in the chip can handle 3d processing, an output resolution of 1440x900 and full 1080p @ 30 fps along with HDMI

    Ample scope for Touchpad2! No doubt when iPad3 escapes the spec will be similar!
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by clevin View Post
    High clocking CPU will finish the same task faster, therefore reduce the running time and conserve the battery.
    Power use for different speeds is not necessarily linear. Motherboard overclockers know this well, with higher voltages required for higher speeds. Just because something finishes a task sooner doesn't mean it will use less energy.
    If I show up at your door, chances are you did something to bring me there.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Blank View Post
    Power use for different speeds is not necessarily linear. Motherboard overclockers know this well, with higher voltages required for higher speeds. Just because something finishes a task sooner doesn't mean it will use less energy.
    I believe webOS internal has posted an article regarding the battery life when using uberkernel, arguing the same theory as I suggested.

    I also believe those who use uberkernel, myself included, observe no ill effect in battery life.

    PS, Higher voltages is NOT required for OC up to certain clock.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by clevin View Post
    I believe webOS internal has posted an article regarding the battery life when using uberkernel, arguing the same theory as I suggested.

    I also believe those who use uberkernel, myself included, observe no ill effect in battery life.

    PS, Higher voltages is NOT required for OC up to certain clock.
    correct

    many overclockers utilize max clock speed on stock voltages.

    this is how uberkernel works. this is why not all will hit a 1ghz oc because voltage is not increased.

    in fact, most laptop cpu's are the same as their desktop variants but theyve been tested to run the same speeds at lower voltages which is better for heat reduction in laptops
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by rwhitby View Post
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  8.    #8  
    Keep in mind that the chips speed is listed as 1.5 GHz already. The Touchpad is advertised at 1.2 GHz. So the Touchpad is underclocked. At 1.5 GHz the Touchpad would run at the chips rated speed, not overclocked.

    My real purpose of this thread was to try to get an idea what features that the Qualcomm chip has that may be attained through homebrew software.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by clevin View Post
    I believe webOS internal has posted an article regarding the battery life when using uberkernel, arguing the same theory as I suggested.

    I also believe those who use uberkernel, myself included, observe no ill effect in battery life.
    I did also say that "Power use for different speeds is not necessarily linear." (I underlined it for sake of clarity this time.)

    If there is an article there specific to uberkernel, I can't find it using the following search string in Google: site:webos-internals.org uberkernel battery -inurl:git

    In any case, battery life in a cell phone is an extremely subjective thing and subject to many factors including radio availability, interference, reflections, and refractions, not to mention all the varying software use that may be going on. Until someone undertakes some dedicated time testing, all of the evidence is anecdotal.

    Higher voltages is NOT required for OC up to certain clock.
    You might want to check your facts since modern CPUs do vary their voltages based on the speed of the moment. That goes back to the late 1990s with early SpeedStep and PowerNow! implementations in mobile chips and has been fairly standard for a number of years now in desktop chips as well. While a given CPU may clock higher with factory voltages (higher even than the factory-labeled max speed of the chip), that doesn't mean that there are no voltage changes going on.

    The reason for this is that as the chip gets hotter, its electrical resistance rises, hence requiring higher voltage to get past the resistance. This, in turn, creates more heat.

    I even found this article from 1997 that discusses manual voltage changes for overclocking the Pentium and Pentium Pro chips, which is around when I got my start. The technology has only spread since then, as we've been seeing in modern mobile chips.
    If I show up at your door, chances are you did something to bring me there.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Blank View Post

    If there is an article there specific to uberkernel, I can't find it using the following search string in Google: site:webos-internals.org uberkernel battery -inurl:git

    In any case, battery life in a cell phone is an extremely subjective thing and subject to many factors including radio availability, interference, reflections, and refractions, not to mention all the varying software use that may be going on. Until someone undertakes some dedicated time testing, all of the evidence is anecdotal.

    .
    I would have offered the link if i could find it, but i do clearly remember reading it from a webOS internal guy.

    Anyway, engadet seems have a certain way of testing battery. Surely somebody can repeat the test and compare the results before and after OC.

    ---
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  11. #11  
    From a user/overclocker standpoint, we don't see what the actual chipset is doing when it comes to "Speedstep" technology or other voltage modifications. Intel's Speedstep can cause problems in concert with overclocking which is why every BIOS setup on a board that allows overclocking will allow you to disable Speedstep functionality.

    When setting up voltages in the BIOS, you're typically setting voltage at the rated CPU core multiplier/clock speed, and the voltage adjustment system in the BIOS/CPU happens behind the scenes.

    Asking a user to create a new algorithm for the voltage adjustment based on clock speed and temperature would be very complex, and it would likely create a lot of problems.

    What is being talked about here is the voltage requirement to run at the listed CPU speed of the TouchPad, which is 1.2GHz. Running at 1.2GHz absolutely will require less voltage than 1.5GHz so HP can optimize the TouchPad to run at a lower voltage which can save a huge amount of power consumption. Of course, HP's voltage settings will be conservatively high to make sure all non-defective TouchPad's are able to function properly at 1.2GHz. Many of the TouchPads may be able to reach 1.5GHz with stock voltage settings and controls because they just happen to meet better than minimum production quality standards.
  12. #12  
    Oh, and to answer the OP's question "Probably." Sometimes manufacturers re-brand their chipsets that fail the intended speeds as a lower speed or lower performance chip.

    For example, a processor that was manufactured to run at 3.0GHz is unstable at 3.0GHz, but it works great at 2.8GHz. The manufacturer re-labels the CPU to now be a 2.8GHz processor at a cheaper price. A lot of graphics cards were essentially re-labeled like that in the past from GPU speeds to pipeline functionality. I'm not up to speed on current specifics at this point.

    If HP is buying defective 1.5GHz chips now set to run at 1.2GHz (unlikely) at a discount, then maybe 1.5GHz is out of reach with/without voltage changes, but it's more than likely some, maybe even most TouchPads will have no problems running at 1.5GHz without voltage changes and probably substantially faster with voltage changes.
  13. #13  
    They still do that. Some of them will also cut out dead cores by lasing the connections and selling it as a lower-core unit. This allows them to get some money from the unit instead of a total loss.
    If I show up at your door, chances are you did something to bring me there.
  14. #14  
    I have an overwhelming feeling we will see the HP Touchpad running at 2GHz once the necessary items items are released for mass consumption.
    16 Candles, The Breakfast Club SB, Friday SB, App Catalog Fix, Palm Pre/Pixi - USB Modem, TMC Workaround, SCRIM Changing OTF

    The fastest way to install Preware on your WebOS device.
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