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  1.    #1  
    Well-written article (excerpt and link below) talking about how Blackberry and HP can bundle tablets into their enterprise orders, thereby offering volume discounts unlike Apple who has not given price discounts to date.
    Zdnet writer, who is editor-in-chief, seems to think Microsoft is the big wild card in enterprise, as its tablet could offer integration with Microsoft Office, thereby immediately garnering sales even with a late entry.

    A lesser wild card is how good of a selection of corporate apps will be offered by RIM and HP (Apple the clear winner). Quote from RIM exec says 1500 corporate partners currently testing the device and the co seems to have the same partners as HP (SAP, Verizon etc).

    Samsung and Dell are seen as lighter weight players here (Samsung can't offer the same type of bundles as HP) but Dell could ride Microsoft's coattails.

    I like the article as it seems to do a good job of giving insight into how enterprises are currently viewing the tablet market.

    My conclusion from this: HP really needs buy-in from enterprise dev staff to distinguish it from RIM. HP has been touting the ease of its dev tools, I wonder how this pitch is landing. Also HP touting its pc base may be aimed more for short-term message against RIM, HP might need a different message once MSFT gets going.

    HP may have only a short window before MSFT product appears but MSFT has historically taken awhile to iron out bugs so HP may have more time than is evident.

    Interesting that there is no mention of security features by the writer. Does he feel that is not a differentiation factor?

    Also writer does not take into account that HP may be able to straddle both consumer and enterprise, with enough enterprise differentiation from Apple to create a situation where TouchPad starts to be carried into the boardroom and is "good enough" for the consumer space that the CEOs and other execs don't need to buy two tablets.


    "...HPís TouchPad. The TouchPad will feature the WebOS and interact well with HPís printers and PCs. Unlike the PlayBook, HP is going for a 10-inch screen, integration with Google Docs and Web-based services.

    Strengths: HP can bundle the TouchPad in PC deals, layer the device into broader enterprise hardware packages and use its services unit to integrate the tablet.
    Weaknesses: The WebOS is slick, but lacks the app numbers and developer base. Itís unclear how the WebOS will work with apps from the likes of SAP and Oracle...
    The big wild-card for all of these enterprise players is Microsoft. As detailed before, Microsoft could develop a Windows 8 tablet that could leverage its existing base of enterprise wares. A lightweight tablet that leverages Office and PowerPoint well could be the killer app for businesses. If these Microsoft tablets are truly ready for prime-time, look for Dell to be a big ally."


    Assessing the corporate tablet field: Why the enterprise may be different | ZDNet
  2. #2  
    Heh, ZDNet is suddenly relevant.

    The question with M$ is if businesses are willing to follow M$ to Windows 8 or if they would rather take the risk of a new platform with one of the many new competitors. HP should strengthen their office offering (stop "working" with someone to bring document editing and do it yourself) to increase the chance businesses will try webOS.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  3. #3  
    i think Tablet will live or die in consumer market, business market is slow and will follow whatever is prevailing in the consumer market.

    I sure hope HP isn't betting most of its stock on business market.
  4.    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by rsanchez1 View Post
    Heh, ZDNet is suddenly relevant.

    The question with M$ is if businesses are willing to follow M$ to Windows 8 or if they would rather take the risk of a new platform with one of the many new competitors. HP should strengthen their office offering (stop "working" with someone to bring document editing and do it yourself) to increase the chance businesses will try webOS.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Thanks. So I'm gathering from your post that a large group of more "conservative" enterprises will wait for MSFT product before making choices while some of the ones willing to take a chance could be enticed to try HP if HP could get doc editing and other integration and also price discounts as a carrot.

    re zdnet. I saw the zdnet blog post about HP dead on arrival and did not post it here as it seemed like the writer was desperate for clicks, I'm glad the editor in chief weighed-in with a more thoughtful view (and he may have needed to after that article)
  5. #5  
    Business need office software, and if HP can't promise office software, they'll go elsewhere. Plus, with M$ deep business penetration, I would guess the more conservative and cautious businesses won't want to change without something more compelling.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Strengths: HP can bundle the TouchPad in PC deals, layer the device into broader enterprise hardware packages and use its services unit to integrate the tablet.
    Weaknesses: The WebOS is slick, but lacks the app numbers and developer base. Itís unclear how the WebOS will work with apps from the likes of SAP and Oracle...
    The big wild-card for all of these enterprise players is Microsoft. As detailed before, Microsoft could develop a Windows 8 tablet that could leverage its existing base of enterprise wares. A lightweight tablet that leverages Office and PowerPoint well could be the killer app for businesses. If these Microsoft tablets are truly ready for prime-time, look for Dell to be a big ally."
    Another strength is that WebOS apps will be easier to develop than BB and iOS apps.
  7. #7  
    Hi all,

    I was just going to post the same article.....if HP does do well in the enterprise market, as I fully expect they will....we should also see it slowly catching on in the private sector, (as more people get to know webOS they will want to use it as home as well at the office).

    The enterprise market will also cause the app levels to shoot up nicely, which in turn will spur other apps. The more apps the more the public will notice webOS. Sadly the critics, newspapers & magazines are fixated on number of apps available instead of quality of apps.

    I know I can go a whole life time without ever buying apps that copy the noises of bodily functions..let alone dozens and dozens of them.

    Take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  8. #8  
    IMO the enterprise sector is ripe for the taking and HP is in a great position with already having a foothold in this sector to take advantage of it. Another spin off of this is that the business users will take these devices home thus exposing more of the consumer market to webOS.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by clevin View Post
    i think Tablet will live or die in consumer market, business market is slow and will follow whatever is prevailing in the consumer market.

    I sure hope HP isn't betting most of its stock on business market.
    I disagree. I think a lot of businesses will like the idea of a computer that's mobile and typically gives the user less power to change things on it.
  10. #10  
    Well, I just have one thing to say: in all this years, no one good solution to mobile workers was found. Notebooks with Windows work, but it is far from perfect, and is only acceptable in most cases..

    I have many reps that work travelling, and it's terrible try to use our systems around the country.

    IF... and I told "IF", the ToucHPad show a good choice to software development and interacting with our servers, can be very easy give one tablet to each one.

    The Apple and Google solutions is not interesting to us, because our control and security is very, very important... sometimes, more than mobility!


    Best Regards...
    "If A Man Isn't Willing To Take Some Risk For His Opinions, Either His Opinions Are No Good Or He's No Good!" - Ezra Pound (Poet & Critic)
    (Happy A Lot, As A Good Carioca!)

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