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  1.    #1  
    I'm a big PC builder and I have a fairly simple rule for my desktop, 1 major upgrade every 3 years, maybe a new gpu at the half way point just because I can for the most part. For the most part thats how long it takes before my higher end system starts to become dated and have to really work hard for lower levels of performance in most programs. Its not really until 5 years that a pc really becomes seriously dated.

    My last laptop lasted 5 years before it gave up the ghost and became useless, mainly because I only ever really used it for documents and web surfing anyways as it had no dedicated graphics.

    Now Android is the prime example but this also does apply to the iphone and the Pre phones. An Android phone is dated and quite likely isnt going to be updated to the next update or cant run the newest apps by the end of the same month it came out in (HTC promises a 6 month guarantee on updates). The iphone is updated yearly and each phone generally has a lifetime of 2 years for support, the Pre- got less than a year for official support.

    My question is, Can I expect at least a 2 year window for the Touchpad/tablets or can we expect what seems to be happening with honeycomb and the ipad and have refreshes every 6 months (rumors of the iPad3 and Xoom2 coming out soon). Or is this simply because the hardware is still not mature enough and is evolving too fast for this to work. Because I do not want to be forced to upgrade every year with another $600 tablet just to run the newest angry birds addition .

    Does it worry anyone else that we might see the trend of phones expand to a segment that is much more closely related to the computer, in my mind at least.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by dcbo89 View Post
    I'm a big PC builder and I have a fairly simple rule for my desktop, 1 major upgrade every 3 years, maybe a new gpu at the half way point just because I can for the most part. For the most part thats how long it takes before my higher end system starts to become dated and have to really work hard for lower levels of performance in most programs. Its not really until 5 years that a pc really becomes seriously dated.

    My last laptop lasted 5 years before it gave up the ghost and became useless, mainly because I only ever really used it for documents and web surfing anyways as it had no dedicated graphics.

    Now Android is the prime example but this also does apply to the iphone and the Pre phones. An Android phone is dated and quite likely isnt going to be updated to the next update or cant run the newest apps by the end of the same month it came out in (HTC promises a 6 month guarantee on updates). The iphone is updated yearly and each phone generally has a lifetime of 2 years for support, the Pre- got less than a year for official support.

    My question is, Can I expect at least a 2 year window for the Touchpad/tablets or can we expect what seems to be happening with honeycomb and the ipad and have refreshes every 6 months (rumors of the iPad3 and Xoom2 coming out soon). Or is this simply because the hardware is still not mature enough and is evolving too fast for this to work. Because I do not want to be forced to upgrade every year with another $600 tablet just to run the newest angry birds addition .

    Does it worry anyone else that we might see the trend of phones expand to a segment that is much more closely related to the computer, in my mind at least.
    With the Touchpad you will be able to have it for 2 years and still get updates because HP will have yearly updates. The thing about WebOS right now is that it is still growing and HP is adding continually to the OS. They are daily maturing the UI and its features. With a desktop PC, you don't see an update, other than a few service packages, in 3-5 years. This is better for the TouchPad because it will be getting better every month that you have it, unlike a PC when it get worse every day you use it. HP will support it for at least 2 years unless there is a huge change like has happened with Enyo, but the great thing about that is that we already have gone through it.

    WebOS won't be like Android because 6 months after July 1st, the TouchPad will still be the best WebOS tablet, although there might be the Opal which will be the TouchPad but smaller. We will get continual updates and because there is no carrier lock to wifi versions, all the wifi versions int he world will be in sync with the latest update. So around July 1st of next year you will be able to get a new TouchPad and "upgrade the GPU, processor, and add a back camera" but you will still be able to download the same apps. We won't have to worry about this for the next 2 years. However, in 2 years we will have to reevaluate again of course
    "Life is Hard... it's harder if your stupid"
    - John Wayne
  3. #3  
    when compared to an Android maker, HP will have fewer hoops to jump through with regards to pushing out an update. Since HP controls the hardware and the software, I expect apple levels of consistency moving forward.

    Personally, i dont see the release of a new device as a real problem so long as current devices continue to be supported. I understand that there are folks who like to keep up with the latest, but if you look at apple's model, the hardware upgrades have been incremental and older devices maintain, for the most part, feature parity with the new devices. the 3gs isnt suddenly a peice of crap simply because the iphone 4 exists. both phones still get OS updates and run the same apps (mostly). it will likely be the same with webOS products.
  4. #4  
    This is becomming the crux of all platforms, and Android isnt the only one who has to worry about fragmentation. I would like to have a phone for the duration of my contract, if I sign any more in the future. I think the biggest concern, as specs now start to be on that of the computer level, is compatibility with features like apps and new technologies. Its hard to believe, though, that devices created today with processors over 1Ghz can have any problems running almost any future technology for the next 3-5 years. Only hardware things like NFC, 3D, camera specs, etc. are the differentiators. I said all of that to say that once a manufacturer is done making profits off of that hardware, they should release the software, SDK's and drivers to open source so that the community (like webOS Internals) can continue to develop for that device. That would make me happy, but I can see how companies would view that as a roadblock towards selling even more devices.
    Treo 300->Treo 600->Treo 650->Treo 700p-> Palm Pre-> Samsung Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch (32GB Launch-day Touchpad sustains my webOS need for now)
  5. Xadion's Avatar
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    #5  
    As far as updates go...if HP does updates like Palm did then ...

    UNLIKE Dorid where you get an update and it gets slower-

    On my Pre- I got about 5 updates in the first 6months or so- each time it got BETTER- faster- more battery- MORE features etc- unlike droid or windows where you loose speed/reliability- it gained
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by dcbo89 View Post
    ...My question is, Can I expect at least a 2 year window for the Touchpad/tablets or can we expect what seems to be happening with honeycomb and the ipad and have refreshes every 6 months (rumors of the iPad3 and Xoom2 coming out soon). Or is this simply because the hardware is still not mature enough and is evolving too fast for this to work. Because I do not want to be forced to upgrade every year with another $600 tablet just to run the newest angry birds addition...
    The TouchPad will in all likelihood be replaced by a substantially better model in under 1 years time, but that doesn't mean it's not going to be able to handle "Angry Birds" in two years. I expect 1 year updates. If updates are more frequent than that, it's because the device failed to live up to expectations.

    Google has announced that it's going to require manufacturers/carriers to allow updates to their devices for at least 18 months after release. I believe this goes into effect with Ice Cream Sandwich. Ice Cream Sandwich will be the dual role Tablet/Smartphone OS.

    What Is Android's Ice Cream Sandwich?
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    when compared to an Android maker, HP will have fewer hoops to jump through with regards to pushing out an update. Since HP controls the hardware and the software, I expect apple levels of consistency moving forward.
    This was part of the logic I used back when I bought my Pre+… …look how that turned out.

    I was “unofficially” (everything short of an official news release from palm) being told that I would have flash support at some point soon on the day I bought it.

    Now I don’t think HP will be liquidated by another company in a year, but it isn’t completely out of the realm of possibility that HP sells off/licenses its consumer WebOS efforts to another manufacturer, or just drops that effort entirely if it finds that the corporate/industrial market is a much better area to play in. That is all unlikely, but not impossible.

    Only certainty here is that no company has *promised* any level of future support in the consumer electronics realm. You’re still just reading the tea leaves if you try and extrapolate out past the day you buy the thing. Even when it sounds like a “sure thing.”

    -Suntan
  8. #8  
    i don't know, and nobody does.

    hardwares maybe able to last a decent time. but you never know if hp will decide stop supporting and updating after one or two production cycle.

    hp already shows they mean business and will not backward support 1.5 year old devices, who here can guarantee you anything?

    i would guess you are safe for one year, you are likely okay for two years. and it probably will cease to be supported after 2 years.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by clevin View Post
    i don't know, and nobody does.

    hardwares maybe able to last a decent time. but you never know if hp will decide stop supporting and updating after one or two production cycle.

    hp already shows they mean business and will not backward support 1.5 year old devices, who here can guarantee you anything?

    i would guess you are safe for one year, you are likely okay for two years. and it probably will cease to be supported after 2 years.
    If you look at the Pixi+ on AT&T, support essentially ended within 6 months of the device's release. With Google's new 18mo update contract, I'd say Google has provided people with a much more clear indication of ongoing OS support than HP has right now.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by EvilKell View Post
    If you look at the Pixi+ on AT&T, support essentially ended within 6 months of the device's release. With Google's new 18mo update contract, I'd say Google has provided people with a much more clear indication of ongoing OS support than HP has right now.
    Google doesn’t make gadgets. They make the OS. They want the OS to be up to date on as many of the gadgets out there as possible.

    Moto, HTC, Samsung, etc. make the devices. How many of them have gone out of their way to commit to the “framework” that Google has “proposed?”

    Don't get me wrong. I like to see Google voicing the concern and trying to do something about it, but it is far from set in stone.

    Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched. Nobody supports these cuttign edge gadgets nearly as long as their customers would like them to.

    -Suntan
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    ...
    Now I don’t think HP will be liquidated by another company in a year, but it isn’t completely out of the realm of possibility that HP sells off/licenses its consumer WebOS efforts to another manufacturer, or just drops that effort entirely if it finds that the corporate/industrial market is a much better area to play in. That is all unlikely, but not impossible.

    Only certainty here is that no company has *promised* any level of future support in the consumer electronics realm. You’re still just reading the tea leaves if you try and extrapolate out past the day you buy the thing. Even when it sounds like a “sure thing.”

    -Suntan
    And of course, the world could blow up at any point in time, and render every bit of this discussion moot.

    To the OP's initial question - The TP hardware and software are currently controlled by HP. Beyond some hints at licensing to other vendors, there's no reason to believe that will change. Even if HP were to license to other vendors, there is no reason to believe they will not continue to provide updates.

    I doubt you'll be able to dig in and change out the CPU, but beyond that, there's no real reason to believe the TP won't serve you well for 2 years, maybe as many as 3.
  12. #12  
    In spite of the naysayers on here, HP has not dropped support of the Pre or Pixi. "Not developing a new OS" != "not supporting"
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    Google doesn’t make gadgets. They make the OS. They want the OS to be up to date on as many of the gadgets out there as possible.

    Moto, HTC, Samsung, etc. make the devices. How many of them have gone out of their way to commit to the “framework” that Google has “proposed?”

    Don't get me wrong. I like to see Google voicing the concern and trying to do something about it, but it is far from set in stone.

    Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched. Nobody supports these cuttign edge gadgets nearly as long as their customers would like them to.

    -Suntan
    Don't forget after all of that, you still have to get carrier approval. Don't see VZW/Sprint/ATT rushing to constantly test 15 different android updates all the time for the rest of forever.

    Think about how many android based phones are released... then "supporting" them for 18 months.... that would be A LOT (constant) of carrier testing for updates. This is never going to happen, it is good business practice for google to say they want it, but it's unrealistic.
    I love physical keyboards... but there is two devices that would make me consider a slab, one is something running a full version of Open webOS. The other is an iPhone!!!! HA HA just kidding (about the iPhone that is)...

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