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  1. #81  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Another article from AllthingsD, based on analyst report suggesting
    Sony, Motorola and Samsung no longer like Android as consumers see all Android handsets the same, meaning their handsets are being lumped by consumers with lowend Android handsets by Acer etc.
    WebOS could be the "premium" differentiator for them.
    Excerpt from article and link below:


    'They’re starting realize that their Android devices [are no different] in the eyes of the customer [than a] $20 Android Phone from Huawei,” Chowdhry says. “They’re worried that Android may dilute their global brand as customers put them in the same bucket with Acer, Asus, ZTE, Huawei, and MediaTek.”

    And if that’s the case, Sony, Motorola and Samsung might be interested in another mobile OS, one that would preserve their premium brand.

    Which is where HP’s webOS comes in.

    It’s a widely acclaimed platform and it’s not fragmented at all. If the company were to license it to a few select partners under the right conditions it could extend the operating system’s reach and bolster HP’s revenues. Define a handful of well-conceived reference designs to which OEM partners must adhere and charge them $50 to $75 per device.

    By doing that, HP could keep hardware quality high and position webOS as a premium alternative to Android. Which may be just what companies like Sony, Motorola and Samsung are looking for.'

    Could HP Push webOS as a Premium Alternative to Android? - John Paczkowski - Mobile - AllThingsD
    Article from eweek below discusses that same analyst report and quotes other analysts with their opinions, like us on Precentral there seems to be a range of opinions on this, excerpts below:

    "As things stand today, Android has probably peaked, and probably will start showing slow and gradual decline," Chowdry added.

    This opens the door for HP, whose CEO Leo Apotheker has said the company might be amenable to licensing webOS to these handset and tablet makers.

    WebOS would enable only two or three reference designs for only three or four OEM partners to limit the fragmentation that exists within the Android ecosystem, Chowdry suggested.

    The analyst believes HP could license webOS for somewhere in the range of $50 to $75 per OEM smartphone or tablet, enabling the company and OEMs partners such as Samsung, Motorola and Sony to drive their premium brand at the expense of low-cost rivals such as Huawei and ZTE.

    Moreover, since webOS is not free, the customer may be willing to pay for applications, making HP potentially a more viable OS option than Android to Apple iOS and the popular App Store.

    However, tech analysts believe Chowdry's scenarios are unlikely, citing Samsung's strong commitments to Android on smartphones and Android 3.0 "Honeycomb" tablets, among other factors.

    "While anything is possible with Samsung (they seem to do one of everything ever made), it's unlikely HP would be that anxious to license WebOS, and it's less likely that Samsung would want it without having a significant ecosystem in place to promote it (e.g., lots of apps and user demand)," industry analyst Jack Gold told eWEEK in an email. "
    HP WebOS May Benefit From Frustrated Android OEMs - Midmarket - News & Reviews - eWeek.com
  2. #82  
    Quote Originally Posted by southflguy View Post
    Android is a dime a dozen. They're everywhere and the OS is not unique among phones. WebOS is.
    I guess I come from the old-school mentality that it is a *good* thing to have the OS on products that are ubiquitous. Thus insuring large consumer acceptance, as well as large development of new applications on it.

    If you want to be contrarian, then yeah WebOS (as it stands today) is a good choice for that. My desire to be unique is not that high. I much more desire choice of handsets and some confidence that people will actually make applications for them in the future.

    -Suntan
  3. #83  
    In light of the TP reviews, I would say HP can't move quick enough on licensing their OS. Put it in the hands of companies that can deliver on hardware!
  4. #84  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    I guess I come from the old-school mentality that it is a *good* thing to have the OS on products that are ubiquitous. Thus insuring large consumer acceptance, as well as large development of new applications on it.

    If you want to be contrarian, then yeah WebOS (as it stands today) is a good choice for that. My desire to be unique is not that high. I much more desire choice of handsets and some confidence that people will actually make applications for them in the future.

    -Suntan
    It's not old school mentality, really -- it's just common sense. If I can write a single application and sell it to users of 20 different tablets from 20 different OEMs, that's a very enticing proposition.
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