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  1.    #1  
    I remember people complaining about the touchpad only having a 10bit screen. But the 10bit means per colour. So theres 10bits of red and 10bits of blue and 10 bits of green.

    or 1111111111 converted to decimal is 1023.

    then 1023 x 1023 x 1023 = 1070599167 colours
    or 1.07 billion which is the same number that the apple cinema display or the dell u2711 ultrasharp monitor can display. Also think its the same display used in the ipad, just like any 10 bit IPS monitor using all 10bits will rely upon the software, but I reckon this screen is going to be awesome.
  2. #2  
    Thanks for the clarification as most people here don't know what it really means. I had to go and do a little bit a research myself to understand it fully.

    Every person who saw it at the Feb 9th event said that the screen looked brilliant. I just can't wait to set my eyes on it when it comes out in 'summer'.
    "Life is Hard... it's harder if your stupid"
    - John Wayne
  3. #3  
    Wait.... I just went on Palm's website and checked the Tech Specs and turns out the screen actually has a 18 bit color screen. Let the mouth watering begin...
    "Life is Hard... it's harder if your stupid"
    - John Wayne
  4.    #4  
    mmmm, that either means that the OS is only capable of delivering 262143 colours or 18014192351838207 colours. I don't think anything can display the later.
    They said in the specs released a few months ago that it was a 10bit IPS screen, so its either limited to 262143 for some reason or the 18 bit part is just a typo, or the original 10bit IPS claim was wrong?
    Last edited by itsthetaste; 04/17/2011 at 04:41 PM. Reason: missed a bit off
  5.    #5  
    actually, I can't find where I read it was a 10bit IPS. I can find references to it being an IPS screen, so maybe I assumed it would be 10 bit. Anyway, a bit more research shows that 18bit means that each or the colours has 6 bits or 63 shades and so 63*63*63=250047 colours. So, apart from me looking a fool for thinking it had a 10 bit display, can anybody confirm, and how does this compare to other tablet/slates?
  6. #6  
    Guys, The 10 or 18 bits really means 10/18 bits per pixel, not per color.
    So, if you have a 10 bit screen you'll only have 1024 colors per pixel, not really good in most people's opinion (The Commodore Amiga has 4096 colors)

    On the other hand, 18 bits mean 262144 colors per pixel, that's another thing, really better, but not close to the 24 bits most computers handle.

    The calculation is per pixel, 2^10 or 2^18.
    Normally the bits are separated by color, for example, when you have a 24 bit display, you have 8 bits for red, 8 bits for green and 8 bits for blue. For 18 bits I'm assuming 6 bits per color (64 shades of each color).

    It may not sound too good, but let me remind you the first VGA monitors, even 256 colors looked gorgeous, so, 256000+ color are going to be just GREAT!!!

    Of course, if I'm wrong, someone correct me with a good, believable source, not just words
    Just remember: If I helped you, press the thanks button!

    Owner of: Pre Sprint, Pre Telcel, Pre Plus AT&T, Pre 2 Unlocked, Pixi Plus AT&T, and 2 TouchPads (my Pre3 was stolen so it won't appear again here).
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  7.    #7  
    maybe it's 6bit per colour and uses A-FRC as descibed here to make 16.7m colours.
    Interesting information about e-IPS panels... - Flat-Panels-LCDs - Computer-Peripherals
    and
    LCD and TFT Monitor News
    Whichever way I'm still gona get one
  8. #8  
    its 6 bits per color. No worries though, even bluray is only 8 bits per color. So its not like its gonna be awful or anything or the sort.
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)

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