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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI. I thought this was a very upbeat review...

    Takecare,

    Jay

    Hewlett-Packard plays its cards right with new tablet Chris Griffith From: The Australian March 22, 2011 12:00AM

    HEWLETT-PACKARD intends to launch its new TouchPad tablet in June, along with a cloud-based mobile operating system that lets work be transferred by touching devices together.
    The operating system, called WebOS, will be rolled out when HP launches its new TouchPad tablet, and will also be available on its smartphones, PCs and laptops.

    WebOS will run apps delivered by a cloud-based apps marketplace and will work in tandem with Microsoft Windows operating systems on PCs and laptops, where it is accessed by opening a browser.

    HP demonstrated an early pilot of WebOS in San Francisco last week at a summit held after a keynote address by recently appointed chief executive Leo Apotheker, who nominated cloud computing and device connectivity as the foundations of HP's future.

    WebOS initially was developed by Palm, and an earlier version ran on Palm Pre devices. The Australian, 7 Mar 2011
    .End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.
    With HP's acquisition of Palm for $US1.2 billion in July last year, and with former Palm chief executive Jon Rubenstein now aboard, HP can roll out WebOS on its devices.

    On an early version of HP's new TouchPad tablet on show in San Francisco, active WebOS apps appear as a series of cards that can be swiped left and right.

    Each instance of an open application is a card on the screen. If you are concurrently writing two emails, browsing a web page, and viewing a web album, there are four cards.

    WebOS is multi-tasking and, as one would expect, works in portrait and landscape modes.

    Apps are closed by flicking a card upwards off the screen. As with Android and Windows 7 devices, a complete list of apps is accessed through a home screen control.

    The TouchPad's 9.7-inch display with 18-bit colour looked crisp, and performance seemed snappy, as it should with a Qualcomm Snapdragon dual-CPU 1.2-GHz processor. But we'll need to test-drive a final version running everyday apps on ordinary Australian networks before getting excited about performance.

    Models with 16GB and 32GB storage will be available. WebOS tries to get around the disorganisation created by a proliferation of apps by bringing together similar activities into one app.

    All mail, no matter its origin, appears in one place, and its photo organiser presents albums stored on the TouchPad in one place, irrespective of whether they are stored directly on the device, on Flickr or elsewhere.

    During the demonstration, I asked why I couldn't see Picasa among the available sources for the photo app. The answer was: "No problem!" Google or another third-party developer could write a plug-in that delivers Picasa photos as a menu selection within HP's photos app.

    In this way, HP's apps embrace their competitors' codes to create seamless operation from whatever sources of cloud data you have.

    One of WebOS's key features is an ability to transfer active cards from one WebOS-enabled device to another by touching them together.

    The technology to do this is different from GPS technology used in, say, the iPhone's Bump app, where money can be exchanged via PayPal by touching devices.

    Rather, it is patented HP technology to be rolled out inside HP's tablets and phones. For example, if you have to leave home or work in a hurry, you can quickly transfer your active cards from, say, your tablet to your smartphone.

    The demonstration in San Francisco was limited to transferring open web browser cards from a TouchPad to smartphone, so I didn't see this operate in full flight. HP promises broader functionality. HP says this transfer technology initially will be limited to its tablets and smartphones. You will not be able to transfer active work from your WebOS-enabled PC in this way.

    This is a pity. While it's understandable there's no means of transferring data by clinking a TouchPad against a PC monitor or desktop chassis, could HP maybe deliver this to PCs via, say, a small USB-connected box? Maybe one day.

    Despite this limitation, HP intends including a beta version of WebOS on its consumer and business PCs and notebooks towards year's end. That's a huge number, as it potentially includes the myriad new HP multicore PCs replacing retired, old HP Pentiums.

    These replacements, together with sales of its new laptops, TouchPad and smartphones, are why HP boldly predicts it will eventually roll out 10 million WebOS-enabled devices per year.

    HP will enable all its mobile devices with Palm's Touchstone technology, which means devices can be charged wirelessly through induction, without cables.

    Like Apple, Google, and Microsoft before it, HP sees the fostering of a strong apps-building community as essential.

    To aid this, HP wants to make it possible for developers to use a range of platforms to build apps, including Flash. It will provide a backend ability to interpret code from these platforms.

    But HTML, JavaScript, and CSS skills will be all that are needed to start creating an app.

    Chris Griffith travelled to San Francisco courtesy of HP
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Cool nice find. So it looks like webOS won't be dual boot. Very cool. Smart move on HP's part.
  3. #3  
    This is from Australia news, hope TP and pre-3 reached that continent where 95% of the phones are iPhones.
    If this helped you hit thanks.
  4. #4  
    well written complete article
    Gotta stay in the "NO"
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by kkhanmd View Post
    This is from Australia news, hope TP and pre-3 reached that continent where 95% of the phones are iPhones.
    I Know! Its disgusting! Everywhere I turn there is a damn iPhone. How open minded is that?! I wish they'd release the Pre 3 down in AUS, right now (Melbourne VIC) I've only seen 2 Pre's in real life and they are both mine :P


    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Palm m105 >> Zire 72SE >> AT&T Pre Plus >> Pre 2 (cracked)>>HP Veer/Pre 2>>Touchpad>>Pre 3...and I'm only 17 years old! (My own savings)
  6.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Editor02 View Post
    I've only seen 2 Pre's in real life and they are both mine :P


    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    LOL.. Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    LOL.. Take care, Jay
    Haha thanks man. And thanks for sharing the post. Its good to know that it seems the touchpad will officially make it down here, whether or not the Pre 3 does is the real question...


    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Palm m105 >> Zire 72SE >> AT&T Pre Plus >> Pre 2 (cracked)>>HP Veer/Pre 2>>Touchpad>>Pre 3...and I'm only 17 years old! (My own savings)
  8. #8  
    During the demonstration, I asked why I couldn't see Picasa among the available sources for the photo app. The answer was: "No problem!" Google or another third-party developer could write a plug-in that delivers Picasa photos as a menu selection within HP's photos app.
    I do still like that concept about all mail showing up in mail. All chat showing up in a chat app. Pics, no matter from what source, in the pics app. Skype (or whatever substitute) integrated into the phone app.

    This is the killer stuff IMO even moreso than multitasking. But I really wish HP (like Palm before it) wouldn't sit there and wait for google or another dev to write this stuff in. Write it in yourself HP especially since its "no problem." If it's popular and worth having in there, then get it in there. This is what will be reviewed. This is about understanding your market.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    I do still like that concept about all mail showing up in mail. All chat showing up in a chat app. Pics, no matter from what source, in the pics app. Skype (or whatever substitute) integrated into the phone app.

    This is the killer stuff IMO even moreso than multitasking. But I really wish HP (like Palm before it) wouldn't sit there and wait for google or another dev to write this stuff in. Write it in yourself HP especially since its "no problem." If it's popular and worth having in there, then get it in there. This is what will be reviewed. This is about understanding your market.
    +1 I agree. How long will they play out their 'multitasking' card? (pun intended :P) Start improving the other features like all that synergy integration.

    And yes, they should be doing it themselves, if they rely on the individual companies it won't get done and they won't have the extra service to brag about.



    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Palm m105 >> Zire 72SE >> AT&T Pre Plus >> Pre 2 (cracked)>>HP Veer/Pre 2>>Touchpad>>Pre 3...and I'm only 17 years old! (My own savings)
  10. #10  
    Nice article. I like reading good things about webOS.

    On another note, and completely unrelated, I always think of Toilet Paper when people say TP for touchpad.

    Like when I read "I hope TP will work better than that."

    I read toilet paper.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by estebancam View Post
    Nice article. I like reading good things about webOS.

    On another note, and completely unrelated, I always think of Toilet Paper when people say TP for touchpad.

    Like when I read "I hope TP will work better than that."

    I read toilet paper.
    LOL. That's why I ways abbreviate it as "TPad".

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