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  1.    #1  
    Hello all.

    I think that if the community gets firefox, mplayer, openoffice, gimp... to work on the touchpad, we could have the first serious tablet on the market.

    Now if the touchpad remains with the standard set of reduced apps for internet browsing and document editing, it will stay as 'another' tablet.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by Tokafondo View Post
    Hello all.

    I think that if the community gets firefox, mplayer, openoffice, gimp... to work on the touchpad, we could have the first serious tablet on the market.
    Why? Because those same apps are what vaulted Linux to the top of the OS heap?
  3.    #3  
    Well, those are full featured apps which source code is available and can be ported to the touchpad.

    No more 'mobile' versions of websites or 'converted' or 'reduced' versions of documents.

    Remember that both of them have been tried to get to work on Palm Pre, being limited by screen resolution, storage and speed.

    With touchpad, those caveats should be left behind.
  4. #4  
    If WebOS 3.0 works like 2.0 it would be quite easy to get those running, just port over the XServer/Xterm...
    but i hope that more apps get ported as native apps, so you dont rely on a different linux system or xserver. I Hope hybrid PDK apps will make this possible in the future
  5. #5  
    HP would do themselves a big favour by having their 'partners' MS help them get full MS Office compatibility on the TouchPad for starters.
    otterboi3 likes this.
  6.    #6  
    Firefox runs the gecko engine. Could a native web browser be done with the gecko engine?.

    Also, the complete Microsoft Office file formats specs were released to the community some time ago, so a lotbof work is done.
  7. #7  
    The browser would be the least of their worries.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by johncc View Post
    The browser would be the least of their worries.
    WebOS browser as on 1.4.5 is not good enough for touchpad.

    It doesnt remember passwords
    it doesnt display images with higher resolution
    it has no download manager
    it doesnt sync with any desktop browsers
    cant search in page
  9. mapenn's Avatar
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    #9  
    I think that if the community gets firefox, mplayer, openoffice, gimp... to work on the touchpad, we could have the first serious tablet on the market.
    Those would be cool. But I doubt that most buyers would care or even know what those apps are.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    I doubt Microsoft is terribly eager to port Office to webOS so that HP can accelerate their transition from Windows to webOS on all of their devices. Windows 8 will definitely work on tablets so it will be direct competitor to webOS on HP devices.
    I sincerely doubt that WebOS is going to compete with Windows, especially since its first iteration in the near future will be a browser plugin.

    WebOS is a touchscreen OS - best for mobile devices, not a desktop - however, if and when desktops become touchscreen in most consumer's hands, then, perhaps MS would worry, but, I'd say that since 90% of the worlds PCs are Windows based, and NOT touchscreen, that isn't going to change any time soon.

    I still question the rationale of HP putting WebOS on all of their devices, in light of the above.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  11.    #11  
    If OpenOffice (or LibreOffice) matures as a complete product (and I mean fixing bugs and mostly, making it faster), it will compete against Windows 7/8 tablets, because of its free status.

    And a web browser like Firefox is a must in a device with such a screen and resolution. Netbooks with 1024x600 already runs Firefox on Windows or Linux. Why not Touchpad?

    And another question:

    How long will it take to hackers to replace WebOS with Android or an ARM Linux port? (Debian, i.e.)
  12. giggles's Avatar
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by clevin View Post
    WebOS browser as on 1.4.5 is not good enough for touchpad.

    It doesnt remember passwords
    it doesnt display images with higher resolution
    it has no download manager
    it doesnt sync with any desktop browsers
    cant search in page
    Oh because the touchpad dosent run webos 3.0 and a completely rebuilt browser so those are comparable right?

    And having firefox isn't a big deal at all and could easily be ported and I much rather run chromium it's faster and has better desktop synching.

    And a office suite open office or Microsoft word would be nice or even hp's own propriety version would work. And hp dosent have to worry about competing with windows tablets at all no one considers them a threat at all.

    And a editor gimp is garbage and I'm sure hp will have their own photo editing software do to their recent acquisition of a couple photo and image company's
  13. #13  
    HP will be shipping windows tablets if the right version comes along according to Leo.
  14. #14  
    Get open office on there with some decent cloud syncing options and I'd be all over it instantly.

    But if HP managed to get a deal with microsoft over use of a proper office suit (word, exel, powerpoint) I would pay for that
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Tokafondo View Post
    Well, those are full featured apps which source code is available and can be ported to the touchpad.

    No more 'mobile' versions of websites or 'converted' or 'reduced' versions of documents.

    Remember that both of them have been tried to get to work on Palm Pre, being limited by screen resolution, storage and speed.

    With touchpad, those caveats should be left behind.
    Without a reengineered, touch-friendly version, OpenOffice apps would be all but useless on a tablet.

    But like I asked before, after >10 years in the marketplace, OpenOffice has done little to capture market share from Microsoft - does simply putting it on a tablet suddenly change all that?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Without a reengineered, touch-friendly version, OpenOffice apps would be all but useless on a tablet.

    But like I asked before, after >10 years in the marketplace, OpenOffice has done little to capture market share from Microsoft - does simply putting it on a tablet suddenly change all that?
    Kupe;

    Good point.

    I have used both Sun's OpenOffice and IBM's Lotus Symphony (the old Lotus suite converted to openoffice standards), and, while both are quite powerful, they are anything but touchscreen freindly - just having them on a pad will not make them functional on any touchscreen device.

    The good part of this is that these are "grass roots" open source development efforts by Sun and IBM, and they just might see the benefit to make "mobile" versions for all OS's, and THAT could compete heavily with MS's Office in the mobile space, especially if its free, but, I dare say, that's likely not going to be released tomorrow - we don't even know if they are considering it.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Kupe;

    Good point.

    I have used both Sun's OpenOffice and IBM's Lotus Symphony (the old Lotus suite converted to openoffice standards), and, while both are quite powerful, they are anything but touchscreen freindly - just having them on a pad will not make them functional on any touchscreen device.

    The good part of this is that these are "grass roots" open source development efforts by Sun and IBM, and they just might see the benefit to make "mobile" versions for all OS's, and THAT could compete heavily with MS's Office in the mobile space, especially if its free, but, I dare say, that's likely not going to be released tomorrow - we don't even know if they are considering it.
    OpenOffice on mobile devices would be very nice, but quite unlikely. My company uses OpenOffice on very large documents that we don't want to put into a publisher program (typically software documentation). We would use Word, but it is such an anemic, unstable program that it's not financially viable.

    We work with the OpenOffice team a lot (we distribute it with one of our products which has integrated it) and suspect we would hear if a mobile version was under consideration. If anyone's thinking about it, they're keeping it a secret.

    Plus, now that OpenOffice falls under Oracle's greedy clutches, there's a lot of turmoil and uncertainty on the team.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    OpenOffice on mobile devices would be very nice, but quite unlikely. My company uses OpenOffice on very large documents that we don't want to put into a publisher program (typically software documentation). We would use Word, but it is such an anemic, unstable program that it's not financially viable.

    We work with the OpenOffice team a lot (we distribute it with one of our products which has integrated it) and suspect we would hear if a mobile version was under consideration. If anyone's thinking about it, they're keeping it a secret.

    Plus, now that OpenOffice falls under Oracle's greedy clutches, there's a lot of turmoil and uncertainty on the team.
    Kupe;

    Sigh.. so, its up to IBM, eh?



    Good info.. thanks!
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  19. #19  
    There's still LibreOffice
    Home LibreOffice
  20.    #20  
    Well, about (Open/Libre)Office, the key here is not about just having a touchpad version of the suite. It's about having a bluetooth keyboard that you could use to type when travelling, with a device that should last with its batterys for at least 6~8 hours, a thing that no laptop can achieve right now (at least in a usable way).

    I had Quickoffice for Symbian when I had a Nokia 5800, that is a touchpad phone, and it saved the day several times when typing short notes or creating quick spreadsheets that went to be full documents on the desktop.

    (Open/Libre)Office could be that, and much more with a bluetooth keyboard folded in a small case. I've seen reports of people using their Palm TXs, Tungstens or even LifeDrives that way, with DocsToGo.

    The hardware is there. The touchpad has almost the same features that a modern laptop, but without the extra power required for Windows and its 2ghz, 3GB ram and 4GB (if not more) of hard disk requisites.

    HP needs to target this line of products both for consumers and businesses, and even schools, tired of the extra work (viruses, security issues...) needed for keep running Windows PCs, just for being compatible and for being 'what everyone uses', could benefint with this.
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