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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    I just found this article at Innovative Healthcare Technology, web site. It's a nice and frank read...I think you will all enjoy it...

    Take care of yourselves,

    Jay


    Is the WebOS Tablet Useful for Healthcare?

    Published March 7, 2011 3:28 PM by Troy Heidesch

    Innovative Healthcare Technology : Is the WebOS Tablet Useful for Healthcare?

    I have compared the two big operating systems in the tablet and smartphone market. But, an old friend has reappeared with a new owner and looks to grab a piece of the tablet and smartphone pie: WebOS (formerly known as Palm). I bought my first Palm phone several years ago and loved the intuitive interface, its syncing ability, and how well it worked. Unfortunately for Palm, Apple developed a really cool phone you may have heard of and marketed it even better. Unfortunately for Palm, two phone manufactures developed two phones for the WebOS system and neither was particularly inspiring especially when compared to the iPhone. To make matters worse, one of those phones appeared to have issues with its build quality; something that will never be the case with Apple. Palm was left adrift as the two current big players entered the market.
    Partly due to these challenges and the inability of executives and the board to see what was going to happen to the mobile market, Palm lost its edge and appeared to be toast. That is until last year when HP bought palm and gave the OS a serious hardware manufacturer that had a proven track record. This past February, HP, appearing to mimic Apple’s business model, became a hardware manufacturer who introduced a revitalized OS with a really cool looking tablet.

    The HP tablet is similar in size and weight to the iPad. Both tablets use dual-core processors and now have both front- and rear-facing cameras (in case you haven’t heard, the iPad2 was released last week). The HP tablet also offers users the ability to use USB connections with its micro USB. Both tablets have WiFi compatibility but iPad 2 will work on 3G networks while the HP (and Motorola Xoom with Android) is compatible with 4G cellular networks. As a result of the 4G, the Motorola Xoom and HP Touchpad will be able to offer video conferencing anywhere with a 4G connection or WiFi, while the iPad 2 will follow the iPhone 4 and have its "Face Time" available only on WiFi networks.

    Now that we have the hardware comparison out of the way, let’s talk more about the software differences and how it relates to you. First the iOS is a brilliantly elegant system that just works almost every time you use it (no software is perfect right). Interestingly, so is Palm’s. The main differences are again the ability to use flash and multitask for which WebOS allows. Syncing has even gotten more fun with the WebOS as you can now tap your Palm phone against your HP TouchPad and they will share/sync data. Another fun feature is that you can be reading a web page on your phone and, when you reach your tablet and set the phone down onto it, the tablet will automatically bring up the web page. This allows you to sweep data seamlessly between the two. Now, I am not sure if this will work for telemedicine video applications, but that should be possible. The biggest challenge for selling the HP TouchPad seems to be the lack of applications. Currently there are less than 10,000 apps, which sounds like a lot until you consider that Apple has around 315,000 and Android about 120,000. WebOS will benefit in that they, like Android, have an open system allowing developers to fully take advantage of WebOS code and build their apps without the need to be approved or pay a fee to develop their apps.

    I have spent a lot of time comparing both the Android and HP systems to Apple and have spent none comparing them to each other. The reason is that Apple is the obvious king right now. They have the OS to beat. Its interface works beautifully, the tablet hardware is priced much lower than its competition thanks to its vertical integration (they own the hardware and software and therefor do not need to pay multiple royalties), and they make sure that everything works together and does not compromise the integrity of the system as a whole. Interestingly, this appears to be the approach of HP as well. They have a multibillion-dollar company with good hardware development that has just added an operating system into its company. They should be able to reduce their costs, and subsequently ours, while being able to design every piece to work in harmony with each other. Add to that a really easy-to-use interface and multitasking, HP may surprise us.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  


    I thought maybe the author had some information on how the TouchPad would be useful for healthcare; maybe some inside information or speculation. The article seemed only to be another webOS vs Android vs iOS article however (except for one sentence wondering about medical teleconferencing). Did I read too much into the title of the article?
  3. #3  
    Just like every other insight, it seems apps is the issue. Losing a developer like Epocrates is damaging to healthcare looking at HP for a device. Hopefully with their plan of attack on enterprise, they will look to revive Epocrates and bring other new healthcare developers on board.

    Good article though, glad to see more of these pop up as people consider which tablet is going to crop up in the future in different sectors that tablets will be useful in the coming years.
  4. #4  
    Unfortunately another problem the Touchpad has is software lag. If you look at some the video out there demonstrating the use of the device there is quite a bit of lag and poor touch response. There was one particular video where this guy was playing a game and he got notification for a text message. After having to tap a couple times to get the app to load, he then hit the pane with the summary of text to open the thread and it took a good 3 seconds to load.

    I feel like we have already gone through this with the original Palm Pre. Everyone raved about some of the gimmicky stuff and then pointed out the lack of apps and that the OS seemed a little laggy. Only difference is that this time I'm on the more skeptical side of things compared to being an apologist for Palm the first time around.
  5. #5  
    after beating around the bush the author get's to the real point. Apps.
    The biggest challenge for selling the HP TouchPad seems to be the lack of applications.
    a tablet or tablet's sake isn't useful. A medical practitioner needs software to run on it. Stacking windows or swiping windows is irrelevant if the task is for example, managing digital medical records and there is no app to do that. And that is where ipad is way out in front. It's why every demo i've seen of touchpad is about layout and interface and most of the ipad 2 stuff is about all the things you can do with the device. They even mentioned it in the keynote "ipad will change the way doctors practice medicine", or something like that.

    i recently saw websites dedicated to medical apps and many where for ipads. iMedicalApps.com - iPhone, iPad, and Android Medical App Reviews and Commentary 25 iPad Apps Revolutionizing Healthcare

    they've even got a blood pressure doc

    they have a real uphill battle and they'll need to really get on the ball with getting real apps developed. Maybe they are doing it behind closed doors. But it's still an uphill battle.

    oh here it's even referenced on that site ipad and changing medicine. iPad 2 keynote video: "The iPad will change the way doctors practice medicine" | iMedicalApps

    but HP is up against it. Not that Android ain't too.



    there is a great demo of the sort of thing HP needs to be into.
    this is a company called AirStrip. They make medical monitoring software. Here is a real doctor talking about how he can use Airstrip software on an iphone.

    Mind you the software is available also for ipad, blackberry, and windows mobile. it's only 3 minutes but great real world stuff and if HP really wants into that market the sort of things it needs to be doing, And honestly, this is the sort of thing it needs to be showing off in it's keynote the way apple showed off Garage Band.
    Last edited by blackmagic01; 03/07/2011 at 08:23 PM.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by zulfaqar621 View Post
    Unfortunately another problem the Touchpad has is software lag. If you look at some the video out there demonstrating the use of the device there is quite a bit of lag and poor touch response. There was one particular video where this guy was playing a game and he got notification for a text message. After having to tap a couple times to get the app to load, he then hit the pane with the summary of text to open the thread and it took a good 3 seconds to load.

    I feel like we have already gone through this with the original Palm Pre. Everyone raved about some of the gimmicky stuff and then pointed out the lack of apps and that the OS seemed a little laggy. Only difference is that this time I'm on the more skeptical side of things compared to being an apologist for Palm the first time around.
    The TouchPad has a Snapdragon 3rd gen dual core processor clocked at 1.2 GHz. This is more than enough to run a device like lightning. The reason why it was 'laggy' was because was Alpha software, or in other words it was in its extreme early stages. This is why they did not allow anyone to touch it at the event or at CTIA. So I ask you, if a device is able to run a piece of software that is not ready, hasn't been optimized one bit and isn't even developed beyond the frame of the basic core apps.....and run itto the point where HP thought it presentable, how will it run after the system is completed, optimized, bug ridden, and core apps are optimized? You haven't seen the device! No one has den the device at its production quality so CAN NOT make such arguments. Yes the original Sprint Pre which had crappy hardware couldn't run the first iteration of the OS very well.... um merger did the iphone if memory serves me correctly.

    Rant over....

    PS. iLivedessert, good read!
    "Life is Hard... it's harder if your stupid"
    - John Wayne
  7. #7  
    Only one thing:

    The TouchPad doesnt have a front and rear facing camera.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Only one thing:

    The TouchPad doesnt have a front and rear facing camera.
    Only one thing:

    The TouchPad has a front facing camera.
  9. #9  
    That was certainly a non-article. Besides listing off all the same points pretty much every other article like this does, it managed to slip the "Healthcare" word into its title, apparently to attract search engines, since the article itself did nothing to set webOS or the TP apart from any other tablet's ability to work in healthcare. Or maybe the blogger is independent so he was trying to get published on Advance Custom Promotions website. In either case, it's a pretty cheezy approach for a blogger.

    Quote Originally Posted by FliedLice
    Only one thing:

    The TouchPad has a front facing camera.
    When stated in the context of the article:
    Quote Originally Posted by Advance Custom Promotions
    Both tablets use dual-core processors and now have both front- and rear-facing cameras...
    ...LCGuy's statement is also true.
  10. #10  
    I found this article somewhere but forgot to copy the link, this is a summary content:

    After Hewlett-Packard bought Palm and it's WebOS, for $1 billion last year, we knew the company was serious about mobile health. This year, HP is following up with a cadre of four new mHealth product partnerships--which it debuted at HIMSS11 in Orlando last week--plus some new hardware for mobile applications. It doesn't exactly catch HP up to the blazing fast development going on at Apple or Google, but may signal growing momentum.

    The products run the gamut from emergency-related telehealth systems to monitoring systems for seniors. Here's a quick peek:
    • Canvys: HP's first stab at a mobile imaging and picture archiving and communication system (PACS), Canvys can display bio-medical data, plus ultrasound, cardiac and other images. It's augmented with Medweb's cloud-hosted imaging and data repository, HP officials say.

    • LifeBot: Designed for emergency responders, it's powered by LifeBot's Disaster Relief and Emergency Medical Services (DREAMS), and allows EMTs and others to transmit critical patient data in real time, from the site of the emergency. It runs on HP's Slate 500.

    • Medical Information Systems To You (MISTY): Created by Parental Health, the software application has been bundled into HP TouchSmart 9100 PC, and allows users to read, track and send alerts about an aging loved one's daily health indicators, medication status and other values.

    iMedical Apps reviewed the Veer, Pre 3 and the TouchPad and indicated the hardware is sturdy and responsive.

    Although, the health apps may be attracted by the medical community if HP boosts its app development, there is no word yet if the new telehealth offerings will enabled for use on smartphone or tablet

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