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  1. #21  
    Probably june for WiFi model... Which is all I want, but HP has got to get some carrier launch action...
  2. #22  
    the fact remains that from a public (meaning us) standpoint, the CEO does not seem to be on the same page as his VPs from his last statement. Hopefully things have changed but until there is an official announcement it is hearsay, regardless of who's mouth it comes out of.
  3. cgk
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    #23  
    Once this get official, we should have an apps sweep - wasn't the figure "tens of thousand" bandied around by HP?
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    Has a sprint rep confirmed this? Can someone go to a sprint store and asked a rep? If they say no, it's not happening.
    Maybe you should check with that HP worker you're buds with, since he was so sure that there were no plans to put WebOS on HP's PCs.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Maybe you should check with that HP worker you're buds with, since he was so sure that there were no plans to put WebOS on HP's PCs.
    Oh snap!
  6. #26  
    I'm starting not to care when it launches... honestly, all I keep thinking about is price.

    If this thing launches at $699 like the February BGR article, I'm going to laugh my *** off. With the way HP thinks it can operate and succeed, I just wouldn't be surprised.

    As much as I love WebOS, I'm getting ready to give up and the damn thing hasn't even hit the market yet.
  7. #27  
    I hope you meant Leo Laporte cause I'd believe him more then Leo Apotheker
  8. cgk
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    #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    Oh snap!
    I'll believe it when I see it, notice how at HPworld in a Singapore, WebOS had transformed into a 'bolt-on' for media sync on the PC for windows machines?

    If it every amounts to anything more than that, feel free to tap me up and let me know how wrong I was.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by kiefboyjbm View Post
    He also did a short demo and mentioned "how cool the device will be" and that they are ramping up to ship extraordinary quantities of touchpads.
    did he actually say the 2nd part about "extraordinary quantities" or you did?
  10. #30  
    I'm shocked at how this forum has just become a place for everybody to complain. All we want is new hardware from palm/hp/sprint/anyone, but even when we get an app on our nearly ancient phones that is named Superdevice Countdown we end up having to wait months and months to get a chance to actually buy this stuff. How can we possibly be excited/motivated anymore? This sucks!
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by TreoRock View Post
    I won't believe this unless I hear it from Ruby's mouth.
    Sarcasm I hope...
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Would like to hear from an enterprise IT person what their needs are for their companies and pros/cons of Apple, HP, and Blackberry
    I'm in network security working on this very question. Here's a rephrasing of what I had to say recently regarding just this topic when asked about it by upper management.

    Android
    Android's popularity with manufacturers comes down to a single point: no license fee. However, versions and their capabilities all over the map, with pre-2.x versions still around in some cases, four major versions of 2.x around (not factoring in customizations), the new 3.x line coming in, and a hybrid 2.x/3.x version that may be possible. This doesn't factor in customizations such as those undertaken by HTC.

    Upgrades from OEMs are erratic; some release quickly after an update from Google, some slowly, and some tell consumers to purchase a new phone for upgraded versions and the security fixes they provide. Telling someone to buy a new $400 phone (off-contract) to get a security fix is far from ideal, especially if that answer comes along every six months.

    Enterprise support on it is weak, though, as general consumers are considered the primary target by most handset manufacturers. Some companies have expanded their products to fill that niche, but the ability to truly lock it down seems to be limited at this point. That said, it is by far the fastest-moving platform on the market right now, and Google is fast to get its fixes published, even if the manufacturers donít keep up.

    iOS
    Extremely popular, of course, and I believe still the best-selling single-model platform for phone sales, itís much more conservative in its releases, supporting phones two or more years old. The first generation iPhone was supported through version 3.1.3, released last year. The iPhone 3G is still supported by the current version 4.2.1. Support for devices is immediate and clear, and Apple publishes patches every few months at the most, accelerating them when significant security issues are discovered.

    Like Android, though, iOS is focused on the consumer, not the enterprise. Apple has made it clear that they have little desire at this point (at least in public) to get involved in the enterprise and are leaving it to others. Companies have stepped in, but their offerings vary significantly. It is much more locked down and easier to control once the profiles are properly configured, with a number of solutions able to detect when a phone is jail-broken and provide a range of responses from no change to blocking enterprise communications to automatically wiping the phone.

    Windows Phone 7
    Thereís still much uncertainty over this platform, and Microsoftís first patch broke some phones (not many, but enough to be concerned). The platform is supported under Visual Studio, but how well the manufacturers will support it is still a big question.

    However, Microsoftís focus is on the enterprise and its associated control needs, and many of Microsoftís older phones had some very useful enrollment features that to my knowledge are not present on any other phone. These definitely show potential, but if the rest of the phone is a mess to use, itís of limited utility.

    WebOS
    With HPís focus on the enterprise in recent discussions and presentations, WebOS may be something to look at when the new hardware comes out this summer if HP is truly able to deliver a competitive notification and management capability. Right now, WebOS is very much in the same category as Android in terms of enterprise security: the platform is, by default, very open, very accessible, and very hard to lose control of. HP has said that they will be catering to the enterprise market (its bread and butter) with a special focus on security, with something available by release.

    BlackberryOS
    Itís uncertain where RIM is going, except that itís playing catch-up to almost all other platforms in terms of capability. What it has going for it is enterprise ubiquity and security, and the ease of setting up a BES server; what it has against it is poor application design, unpopular development tools, and limited phone hardware. I donít see RIM catching up at this point without a major redesign of the underlying OS that they donít seem to be willing (or perhaps able) to make.

    For purposes of enterprise security, my recommendations are Blackberry first and iOS second, and everything else presents problems at the moment due to either openness, newness, or both. I'm not upgrading my personal phone until the Pre3 comes out, and my colleague is an Android fan who flashes his phone three times a day at least (I'm not exaggerating -- he builds off new code constantly), and we're both in agreement on this point.
    If I show up at your door, chances are you did something to bring me there.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    I'll believe it when I see it, notice how at HPworld in a Singapore, WebOS had transformed into a 'bolt-on' for media sync on the PC for windows machines?

    If it every amounts to anything more than that, feel free to tap me up and let me know how wrong I was.
    Waitaminit, your claim (from your bud) was that there was no plan. It would appear you're hedging a bit now. Would you like a quote?
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Blank View Post
    I'm in network security working on this very question. Here's a rephrasing of what I had to say recently regarding just this topic when asked about it by upper management.

    Android
    Android's popularity with manufacturers comes down to a single point: no license fee. However, versions and their capabilities all over the map, with pre-2.x versions still around in some cases, four major versions of 2.x around (not factoring in customizations), the new 3.x line coming in, and a hybrid 2.x/3.x version that may be possible. This doesn't factor in customizations such as those undertaken by HTC.

    Upgrades from OEMs are erratic; some release quickly after an update from Google, some slowly, and some tell consumers to purchase a new phone for upgraded versions and the security fixes they provide. Telling someone to buy a new $400 phone (off-contract) to get a security fix is far from ideal, especially if that answer comes along every six months.

    Enterprise support on it is weak, though, as general consumers are considered the primary target by most handset manufacturers. Some companies have expanded their products to fill that niche, but the ability to truly lock it down seems to be limited at this point. That said, it is by far the fastest-moving platform on the market right now, and Google is fast to get its fixes published, even if the manufacturers donít keep up.

    iOS
    Extremely popular, of course, and I believe still the best-selling single-model platform for phone sales, itís much more conservative in its releases, supporting phones two or more years old. The first generation iPhone was supported through version 3.1.3, released last year. The iPhone 3G is still supported by the current version 4.2.1. Support for devices is immediate and clear, and Apple publishes patches every few months at the most, accelerating them when significant security issues are discovered.

    Like Android, though, iOS is focused on the consumer, not the enterprise. Apple has made it clear that they have little desire at this point (at least in public) to get involved in the enterprise and are leaving it to others. Companies have stepped in, but their offerings vary significantly. It is much more locked down and easier to control once the profiles are properly configured, with a number of solutions able to detect when a phone is jail-broken and provide a range of responses from no change to blocking enterprise communications to automatically wiping the phone.

    Windows Phone 7
    Thereís still much uncertainty over this platform, and Microsoftís first patch broke some phones (not many, but enough to be concerned). The platform is supported under Visual Studio, but how well the manufacturers will support it is still a big question.

    However, Microsoftís focus is on the enterprise and its associated control needs, and many of Microsoftís older phones had some very useful enrollment features that to my knowledge are not present on any other phone. These definitely show potential, but if the rest of the phone is a mess to use, itís of limited utility.

    WebOS
    With HPís focus on the enterprise in recent discussions and presentations, WebOS may be something to look at when the new hardware comes out this summer if HP is truly able to deliver a competitive notification and management capability. Right now, WebOS is very much in the same category as Android in terms of enterprise security: the platform is, by default, very open, very accessible, and very hard to lose control of. HP has said that they will be catering to the enterprise market (its bread and butter) with a special focus on security, with something available by release.

    BlackberryOS
    Itís uncertain where RIM is going, except that itís playing catch-up to almost all other platforms in terms of capability. What it has going for it is enterprise ubiquity and security, and the ease of setting up a BES server; what it has against it is poor application design, unpopular development tools, and limited phone hardware. I donít see RIM catching up at this point without a major redesign of the underlying OS that they donít seem to be willing (or perhaps able) to make.

    For purposes of enterprise security, my recommendations are Blackberry first and iOS second, and everything else presents problems at the moment due to either openness, newness, or both. I'm not upgrading my personal phone until the Pre3 comes out, and my colleague is an Android fan who flashes his phone three times a day at least (I'm not exaggerating -- he builds off new code constantly), and we're both in agreement on this point.
    thoughtful answer which gives much to think about, thanks.
  15. #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Would like to hear from an enterprise IT person what their needs are for their companies and pros/cons of Apple, HP, and Blackberry
    HP not having video out is bad for enterprise business in my opinion. Tablets will become a note taking device, sharing presentations, doing email. I mentioned in another thread how this would be used more for my enterprise work then at home as I travel. When I have to attend the annual sales kickoff, the tablet could be the only device I would bring if it has some basic enterprise functionality - these include:

    1. email - check
    2. word, excel, powerpoint - check
    3. PDF - check
    4. connectivity to inter/intranet - check
    5. video out for presentation - not check on ONLY the TouchPad. bad news for enterprise I think.
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    #36  
    Martin Blank:

    Regarding your statement on iOS, it is not correct. Apple will be aggressively attacking both the enterprise and government space this year (not just on the iphone either). Apple will soon have qualities that currently only BB has at this time (in mobile space).

    I will send info over to tipb in a few which validate my statement. (up to them if they want to post)
    Last edited by concept2; 03/04/2011 at 07:05 AM.
  17. #37  
    Concept2 can you share with us Apple capability (as you are sending to tipb anyway?).

    Also noticed there was a magazine article posted on another thread yesterday that HP/Palm's current security (activesync?) was not supported by all companies, thus BB was better (see link below). Is this what you are saying HP is promising to change, Martin?

    http://forums.precentral.net/general...-business.html
    Last edited by bluenote; 03/04/2011 at 08:32 AM.
  18. #38  
    At this meeting, did he have on a Superman Tee to match that cool lunchbox?

    New dev mode code: webos06062011 <-- my bet for launch date
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    and yet 80% of their customers are now consumers and this is where they are now concentrating their efforts. I guess on the basis that consumer devices are now driving mobility within enterprise.
    If this figure is global consumers, it's quite easily explained by BlackBerry's runaway popularity in developing countries. Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, mainly consists of sand, geckos and BlackBerries as everybody who's been there will be able to attest.
    Almost every adult person I met there had a BlackBerry; those who didn't generally had no mobile phone at all or only a very old feature phone. There were WAY more BlackBerries than feature phones around though, which I'll admit came as a surprise for me. As for smartphones, I saw two iPhones in three weeks there. I didn't see any Androids outside of store displays.

    This popularity isn't going to change anytime soon either, and all other platforms are currently having a very hard time making any inroads at all into the southern African market - a market you may not especially care for but should on account of its economic growth rates.

    Why is BlackBerry so incredibly popular there? One acronym: BBM.
    People there have a very pragmatic way of looking at telephones. They can choose to spend their money on an Android or iPhone (they have them there, but mostly inside telephone shops) which would allow them to spend even more money on apps - or they can choose to spend their money on a BlackBerry which allows them to never again spend any money on SMS because everbody they know has a BlackBerry as well. Some people I've met there make anywhere between zero and ten phonecalls a month and have completely migrated their entire private communications to BBM.

    Just some insight into why BlackBerry continues to be a platform to be reckoned with on a global scale. They're catering to enterprises in developed countries and consumers in developing countries. Even if they're slowly losing control of the former market, they have the latter one utterly cornered. And I dare say that it's the bigger one, too.
    Last edited by GodShapedHole; 03/04/2011 at 10:56 AM.
  20. cgk
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    #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    If this figure is global consumers, it's quite easily explained by BlackBerry's runaway popularity in developing countries. Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, mainly consists of sand, geckos and BlackBerries as everybody who's been there will be able to attest.
    Almost every adult person I met there had a BlackBerry; those who didn't generally had no mobile phone at all or only a very old feature phone. There were WAY more BlackBerries than feature phones around though, which I'll admit came as a surprise for me. As for smartphones, I saw two iPhones in three weeks there. I didn't see any Androids outside of store displays.

    This popularity isn't going to change anytime soon either, and all other platforms are currently having a very hard time making any inroads at all into the southern African market - a market you may not especially care for but should on account of its economic growth rates.

    Why is BlackBerry so incredibly popular there? One acronym: BBM.
    People there have a very pragmatic way of looking at telephones. They can choose to spend their money on an Android or iPhone (they have them there, but mostly inside telephone shops) which would allow them to spend even more money on apps - or they can choose to spend their money on a BlackBerry which allows them to never again spend any money on SMS because everbody they know has a BlackBerry as well. Some people I've met there make anywhere between zero and ten phonecalls a month and have completely migrated their entire private communications to BBM.

    Just some insight into why BlackBerry continues to be a platform to be reckoned with on a global scale. They're catering to enterprises in developed countries and consumers in developing countries. Even if they're slowly losing control of the former market, they have the latter one utterly cornered. And I dare say that it's the bigger one, too.

    BBM is fascinating, I'm some work at the moment looking at the adoption of it by teenagers in the UK - it's pretty much because BBM allows them unlimited communications on their tarrifs. Moreover, these kids don't install apps at all - expect for facebook. It's all BBM and facebook.
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