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  1. #81  
    Remember, hp has a one up on all the other tablet companies. Its the biggest computer company in the world!! People will see its an hp and hp sells everywhere
  2. #82  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    You didn't pick the best part of my post for your point. No big deal. HP and Apple are different kinds of companies. There is no reason for HP to be in this particular market. SJ controls Disney and ABC. Will HP try to buy a media company just because Apple is there? Will we see an HPTV set-top box? Will there be an hPod touch? Will they announce hTunes? None of this has anything to do with HP

    So, no, it doesn't make sense for them to be chasing the iPad and iPhone into the consumer electronics space. They are not Sony, Samsung, or Moto. The are more like IBM. That's just not very cool. HP makes a pretty good HP. They will make a lousy Apple.
    Your entire argument here is based on the notion that HP is chasing Apple. That may be your opinion, but the very fact that they aren't "buying a media company" sort of dispels that notion.

    HP is simply going after a product line that they believe will be profitable. Have they been there before (not counting the iPaq)? No, not really, but it's not the first time they've ventured where they haven't gone before (no, they really weren't originally a printer company).

    They will continue to be a good HP, because they're not trying to be Apple.
  3. #83  
    hparsons,

    The laser printer is not an example of a loss leader. That's the let's sell the razor for cheap because we will make back a ton of money selling the razor blades. They do the same thing with cells phones by selling them cheap or giving them away because they make it all back and then some on the monthly plan. They even used to sell computers back in the day where they were dirt cheap as long as you signed up with an ISP for 2 years.

    IE is not the definition of a loss leader.

    Read here to see what a loss leader is...

    Loss leader - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Again, name a consumer technology product that does not require a steady supply of over priced consumables, or some type of service contract that is sold at a loss that has gone on to become successful.
    Last edited by SoFly; 01/30/2011 at 08:21 AM.
  4. #84  
    HP is know for Printers and PCs. I see no reason for them to sell the pad at a loss. It's pad is a scaled down version of the laptop. Why would they need to sell it at a loss? People who want a tablet will buy it. People who don't won't.
  5. #85  
    Quote Originally Posted by bdhu2001 View Post
    HP is know for Printers and PCs. I see no reason for them to sell the pad at a loss. It's pad is a scaled down version of the laptop. Why would they need to sell it at a loss? People who want a tablet will buy it. People who don't won't.
    This is the most interesting and provocative post in the thread, IMO. We all suffer a little confusion about what HP is doing and how they should be categorized. You have described their pad as a scaled down laptop. If so, it makes sense for them to do it. Still a fail, as there doesn't seem to be a market for traditional PCs in this formfactor. We could debate that all day. But I wouldn't begrudge HP the right to be in that market. It was perfectly natural, if not misguided for them to make the Slate 500.

    But, the hPad will not be a scaled down PC. It will be a scaled up smartphone. That is so far out of their field, they had to buy a smartphone company, first.

    HP has been making tablets for ages; they are dinosaurs, not pups. Apple has been making a tablet for 9 months; they are pups, not dinosaurs. It seems what Apple made is something new. Yet, people who don't want to give Apple credit for inventing anything, say they are entering an already mature market. Well, we can't have it both ways. Either HP is a dinosaur in this space with a history of perpetual fail, or they are new to the space, entering in Apple's wake as a me-too company.

    I do say that Apple invented a new product category. It is a category so far outside of HP's portfolio, they have to act like a start-up. They have no past to draw on, so they had to buy their way into the space. It will be interesting to see if they actually have any original ideas. They might, but I have my doubts. HP is remaking themselves in order to enter this market. I think that is a bad move. Again, we shall see.
  6. #86  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    This is the most interesting and provocative post in the thread, IMO. We all suffer a little confusion about what HP is doing and how they should be categorized. You have described their pad as a scaled down laptop. If so, it makes sense for them to do it. Still a fail, as there doesn't seem to be a market for traditional PCs in this formfactor. We could debate that all day. But I wouldn't begrudge HP the right to be in that market. It was perfectly natural, if not misguided for them to make the Slate 500.

    But, the hPad will not be a scaled down PC. It will be a scaled up smartphone. That is so far out of their field, they had to buy a smartphone company, first.

    HP has been making tablets for ages; they are dinosaurs, not pups. Apple has been making a tablet for 9 months; they are pups, not dinosaurs. It seems what Apple made is something new. Yet, people who don't want to give Apple credit for inventing anything, say they are entering an already mature market. Well, we can't have it both ways. Either HP is a dinosaur in this space with a history of perpetual fail, or they are new to the space, entering in Apple's wake as a me-too company.

    I do say that Apple invented a new product category. It is a category so far outside of HP's portfolio, they have to act like a start-up. They have no past to draw on, so they had to buy their way into the space. It will be interesting to see if they actually have any original ideas. They might, but I have my doubts. HP is remaking themselves in order to enter this market. I think that is a bad move. Again, we shall see.
    I see Netbooks and iPads as scaled down versions of laptops. I don't see them as laptops, but Apple made Netbooks viable and something that people want. I don't get it. I never wanted a Netbook. I wanted a light weight laptop that let me do everything. I also never wanted a Kindle, but got one for my birthday and love it. If iPads and Netbooks give you unlimited internet (like whispernet) like the Kindle, I'd enjoy it.

    With the Kindle, their is no monthly fee and I'm not tied to a cell phone company. Are iPads the same or do you have to pay for 3G connection and wi-fi? If there's a monthly fee, I just don't see the purpose. I'd stay with my smartphone and laptop.
  7. #87  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    You didn't pick the best part of my post for your point. No big deal. HP and Apple are different kinds of companies. There is no reason for HP to be in this particular market. SJ controls Disney and ABC. Will HP try to buy a media company just because Apple is there? Will we see an HPTV set-top box? Will there be an hPod touch? Will they announce hTunes? None of this has anything to do with HP

    So, no, it doesn't make sense for them to be chasing the iPad and iPhone into the consumer electronics space. They are not Sony, Samsung, or Moto. The are more like IBM. That's just not very cool. HP makes a pretty good HP. They will make a lousy Apple.
    iAds...me-too? So far out of their field they bought a company. Apple is buying mobile advertising company Quattro Wireless for $275 million. Apple makes a good Apple. But a lousy Google.

    iBooks. Me-too? Still a fail versus the likes of Amazon and its Kindle. Apple makes a good Apple. But a lousy Amazon.

    Macbook Air. Me-too? Netbook anyone? I think mac fans are still confused by this one.

    iphone. Me-too? Copied much from Palm. LG Electronics claimed the iPhone's design was copied from the LG Prada. Woo-Young Kwak, head of LG Mobile Handset R&D Center, said at a press conference, "We consider that Apple copied Prada phone after the design was unveiled when it was presented in the iF Design Award and won the prize in September 2006. Apple makes a good Apple but a lousy LG or Palm?

    It's a me-too world. Apple isn't somehow immune from this.

    Just last summer, Apple decided to introduce some more "me-too" innovation with multitasking. Hopefully for iOS 5, we get some more "me-too" features such as improved notifications, lockscreen customizations, etc. Apple makes a good Apple but a lousy Google or Palm. Chasing android and webOS for features? That's just not very cool?

    So HP bought an innovative smartphone company and wants to introduce a scaled up smartphone and call it a tablet? I wouldn't call that me-too. I'd say that's very Apple of them.

    There's a lot of things HP can do to make their pad different. Right off the bat, at least they won't be so controlling as to not allow sideloading or homebrew. Apple's ridiculous stance on this is something that sparks a lot of anti-apple feelings.

    There's no reason for HP to be in this market? To have you tell it, this is the future of computing. Why wouldn't they want to be here? It's what HP does.
    Last edited by cardfan; 01/30/2011 at 10:04 AM.
  8. #88  
    Quote Originally Posted by SoFly View Post
    hparsons,

    The laser printer is not an example of a loss leader. That's the let's sell the razor for cheap because we will make back a ton of money selling the razor blades. They do the same thing with cells phones by selling them cheap or giving them away because they make it all back and then some on the monthly plan. They even used to sell computers back in the day where they were dirt cheap as long as you signed up with an ISP for 2 years.


    IE is not the definition of a loss leader.

    Read here to see what a loss leader is...

    Loss leader - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    You claim what I gave as examples don't fit, then point to a description that fits exactly what I'm saying:
    Loss Lead describes the concept that an item offered for sale at a reduced price and is intended to lead to the subsequent sale of other items, the sales of which will be made in greater numbers, or greater profits, or both. It is offered at a price below its minimum profit margin—not necessarily below cost.
    Printers, and cell phones (don't know why I didn't think of that one, those are a fine example of loss leaders) fit that.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoFly View Post
    Again, name a consumer technology product that does not require a steady supply of over priced consumables, or some type of service contract that is sold at a loss that has gone on to become successful.
    Again??? You never asked that. However, I already gave another example - Internet Explorer. Sorry fella, I was in the retail business for almost a decade and a half, and the computer retail business for a decade of that time. I don't think you're going to teach me about loss leaders.
  9. #89  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    ... Either HP is a dinosaur in this space with a history of perpetual fail, or they are new to the space, entering in Apple's wake as a me-too company.
    Perpetual fail? Huh???

    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    I do say that Apple invented a new product category. It is a category so far outside of HP's portfolio, they have to act like a start-up. They have no past to draw on, so they had to buy their way into the space. It will be interesting to see if they actually have any original ideas. They might, but I have my doubts. HP is remaking themselves in order to enter this market. I think that is a bad move. Again, we shall see.
    Fantasy land, of course. You're using so many metaphors. If this "invention" of Apple (what a joke that concept is) is simply a scaled up phone, then Apple didn't invent it. The smartphone was already around. If it's a new concept from Apple, then it's only a year old, and the start up company that never really got where they wanted with computers is about to have some competition from a company that's been in that space for a long time.

    HP didn't buy any tablet hardware from Palm. They bought an OS. An OS that many say is better than iOS. Anyone that doubts that HP can successfully sell hardware, and that they've "perpetually failed" at doing so, is not thinking in reality.

    Sorry guy, these constant "HP shouldn't even be in this field" is getting old. You ApGuys have some competition headed your way, and I'm sure that's disconcerting, but seriously now - since HP is going to do it - do you think that using a loss leader would help or hurt their effort?
  10. #90  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    You claim what I gave as examples don't fit, then point to a description that fits exactly what I'm saying:

    Printers, and cell phones (don't know why I didn't think of that one, those are a fine example of loss leaders) fit that.
    Except the customer is paying every month to use that phone. So, every month the carrier is receiving guaranteed profit from consumer for that cheap phone.

    A printer is of no use if the customer is not periodically buying printer cartridges at inflated prices to keep printer working giving tons of guaranteed profit to the printer manufacturer.

    So, a customer goes into Best Buy and buys a PalmPad that HP is selling at or below cost. What other HP product will customers be buying that HP knows most customers are going to be buying to offset the loss or no profit made on the PalmPad?

    There is no guarantee that the consumer is going to buy an HP computer because they already have one. There is no guarantee that they are going to buy an HP printer because they already have one.

    The only way HP could guarantee that it received profit is to force consumers to buy an HP computer and printer with the purchase of the PalmPad. Then you will see there is a very, very small market for consumers that want to buy all that just to get a cheap PalmPad.

    Then you have the subsidized model with a data plan. But, are you going to leave out the consumers that want the Wi-fi only model?

    Again??? You never asked that. However, I already gave another example - Internet Explorer. Sorry fella, I was in the retail business for almost a decade and a half, and the computer retail business for a decade of that time. I don't think you're going to teach me about loss leaders.
    Microsoft was not giving away IE to get people to buy another Microsoft product, which is why you use a loss leader. They were competing with Netscape and could afford to give IE away to knock Netscape out of the market.

    Now, if Microsoft were selling Windows XP at or below cost to get you in the store and hope that a lot of consumers would also buy Microsoft Office that has a ton of profit in it's price, then that would be an example of a loss leader.

    You don't need to work in retail to understand how loss leading works.
  11. #91  
    Quote Originally Posted by SoFly View Post
    ...
    So, a customer goes into Best Buy and buys a PalmPad that HP is selling at or below cost. What other HP product will customers be buying that HP knows most customers are going to be buying to offset the loss or no profit made on the PalmPad?...
    There is no guarantee. Just as when you go into the grocery store to buy the loss leader eggs or bread, there is no guarantee that you will buy the steak. The grocer is hoping that while you're there, you will consolodate your trips, and buy the steak there. The person buying eggs or bread may already have steak, they may not want steak, they may be there just to cash in on a great deal on bread and eggs. It's a marketing technique, not a guarantee of success.

    In the case of HP, if the did this with the tablet (and again, I don't think they are, or that they should), the WebOS based ecosystem would be the steak that they're hoping you buy.

    Again, I don't think they're going to do this. I think what we may see is a bundle.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoFly View Post
    Microsoft was not giving away IE to get people to buy another Microsoft product, which is why you use a loss leader. They were competing with Netscape and could afford to give IE away to knock Netscape out of the market.

    Now, if Microsoft were selling Windows XP at or below cost to get you in the store and hope that a lot of consumers would also buy Microsoft Office that has a ton of profit in it's price, then that would be an example of a loss leader.

    You don't need to work in retail to understand how loss leading works.
    Microsoft (and HP) don't have literal "stores". The "store" is the marketplace in general.

    You are mistaken, Microsoft did not give away IE just to compete with Netscape. Why invest money in developing a program only to give it away? They were giving it away (after first failing to be able to sell it) to further establish their hold on the OS market (sorry, XP had nothing to do with it, Windows 95 was the hot item then, and Windows ME was just a gleem in someone's crazy imagination, XP wasn't on the radar yet). It's a prime example of loss leader.

    And I agree, you don't need to work in retail to understand how loss leading works; but a little real life experience does a lot more to understand it than just reading about it on wikipedia.
  12. #92  
    Remember Warren Buffett's first rule of investing:

    Don't lose money

    HP isn't going to deliver a million or more devices into a market that is less than a year old and lose money on purpose. If they don't do well in the market, they will probablt show up on woot.com, but they are in this game to make money.
  13. #93  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    iAds...me-too? So far out of their field they bought a company. Apple is buying mobile advertising company Quattro Wireless for $275 million. Apple makes a good Apple. But a lousy Google.
    Apple's iAds are done way nicer than the way Google does ads. With iAds, when you are done looking at the ad, it takes you back to the app and NOT kick you out of the app like Google ads do.

    Apple improved the way users view ads on a mobile device.

    iBooks. Me-too? Still a fail versus the likes of Amazon and its Kindle. Apple makes a good Apple. But a lousy Amazon.
    iBooks have color. Kindle does not.

    Apple improved the book reading experience for those that read books that have color pictures, illustrations, etc.

    Macbook Air. Me-too? Netbook anyone? I think mac fans are still confused by this one.
    MacBook has a full-sized keyboard, and a screen that is not so small that you hate to use it like you do with so many of those cheap netbooks.

    Apple improved the netbook model by making the MacBook Air very thin and light, but still fully useful.

    iphone. Me-too? Copied much from Palm. LG Electronics claimed the iPhone's design was copied from the LG Prada. Woo-Young Kwak, head of LG Mobile Handset R&D Center, said at a press conference, "We consider that Apple copied Prada phone after the design was unveiled when it was presented in the iF Design Award and won the prize in September 2006. Apple makes a good Apple but a lousy LG or Palm?
    Palm had nothing out like the iPhone when it came out in 2007. So how did Apple copy Palm?

    So, this LG phone shown to the world in Sept 2006 and 4 months later Apple was able to copy it and have a working example on display at Macworld in January 2007? OK, you keep believing that.

    It's a me-too world. Apple isn't somehow immune from this.
    Except Apple improves upon what everyone else does and their stuff stands out. Like the iPad.

    Just last summer, Apple decided to introduce some more "me-too" innovation with multitasking. Hopefully for iOS 5, we get some more "me-too" features such as improved notifications, lockscreen customizations, etc. Apple makes a good Apple but a lousy Google or Palm. Chasing android and webOS for features? That's just not very cool?
    They did it their way with only certain functions allowed to work in the background to save battery life. Do you really think they waited for Palm to put multi-tasking in the Pre first? They just took their time to make sure it didn't kill battery life or one app hog the processor.

    If Apple were chasing Google they would have a new iPhone model coming out every month with a different OS version that doesn't work with the older phones, etc.

    If, they were chasing Palm...oh, wait. That would be just stupid.

    So HP bought an innovative smartphone company and wants to introduce a scaled up smartphone and call it a tablet? I wouldn't call that me-too. I'd say that's very Apple of them.
    Apple made the first tablet that the masses actually wanted to buy after tablets being around for over 10 years and not selling. Apple has already made what people want. So, I think it is HP being me-too, we also make tablets.

    There's a lot of things HP can do to make their pad different. Right off the bat, at least they won't be so controlling as to not allow sideloading or homebrew. Apple's ridiculous stance on this is something that sparks a lot of anti-apple feelings.
    By whom? The geeks in the world? HP cannot survive off geeks alone. They also have to sell to the larger mass market. Apple has no problem selling tons of iPhones, iPad, and iPod touches to millions of consumers that must like Apple's controlling nature.

    There's no reason for HP to be in this market? To have you tell it, this is the future of computing. Why wouldn't they want to be here? It's what HP does.
    They can be in the tablet market. But, doing what they do best. Which is selling commodity products at cheap prices. So, if they can bring out a PalmPad that is a lot cheaper than the iPad, but still making a profit they can go for those consumers that value price over anything else.
  14. #94  
    Wow...you think iAds, iBooks, and the MacBook Air are improvements on anything? You're pretty much undermining everything else with those statements.

    The MacBook air has exactly ONE standard feature that separates it from most net and notebooks: A SSD. If it means so much to a user, they can get an Acer or HP ultraportable with one as an add-on, still come out $300 or more ahead and keep it moving with more memory, better graphics processing, a CPU that's actually current.

    iBooks and iAds offer more "flash" (tee hee) to their respective experiences. Not functional improvements.

    But cardfan's point is rock solid. Apple copies like everyone else. In my opinion, the difference is that they have been smart enough since the dawn of the iPod to leverage all of their strengths into each new product line with iTunes as the glue tying it together. Other companies like Microsoft or Samsung that have diverse product lines will have a smash or two (e.g. Kinect, Galaxy S, Xbox), but are unaware or unable to leverage it into strengths in other product lines.

    This is a singular skill that Apple seems to have mastered exclusively. But it does not mean that they only improve and don't copy in a "me too" fashion. They do. It sometimes even takes them several tries to get things right.
  15. #95  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Microsoft (and HP) don't have literal "stores". The "store" is the marketplace in general.
    Actually, MS does have retail stores. You know how they love to copy Apple after Apple does it first.

    You are mistaken, Microsoft did not give away IE just to compete with Netscape. Why invest money in developing a program only to give it away? They were giving it away (after first failing to be able to sell it) to further establish their hold on the OS market (sorry, XP had nothing to do with it, Windows 95 was the hot item then, and Windows ME was just a gleem in someone's crazy imagination, XP wasn't on the radar yet). It's a prime example of loss leader.
    Apple is constantly upgrading iTunes and they have never charged for it. Adobe upgrades Flash Player and Adobe Reader but they don't charge for it.

    There is plenty of software that software developers develop that they don't charge for. It all depends on what the software is going to be used for.

    I used Windows XP as an example of something being used as a loss leader to get you to buy something more expensive. Not, when it was released.

    And I agree, you don't need to work in retail to understand how loss leading works; but a little real life experience does a lot more to understand it than just reading about it on wikipedia.
    I gave the wiki example because you don't know what loss leading is.

    Loss leading is having a product that is sold at or below cost that consumers need to buy and that product gets you in the store and once there the store hopes you buy other expensive things.

    Microsoft giving away IE does not meet that criteria for loss leading. When a consumer downloads IE, they are not going to purchase Windows because they already have Windows installed in order to download IE and install it. So, just how did Microsoft make more money off the consumer when they installed IE? Remember, loss leading is hoping you buy high profit items like steak when you pick up the milk and eggs.

    That has always been the traditional way that loss leading has been used. You can think what you want.
  16. #96  
    [QUOTE=mikah912;2842926]Wow...you think iAds, iBooks, and the MacBook Air are improvements on anything? You're pretty much undermining everything else with those statements.

    The MacBook air has exactly ONE standard feature that separates it from most net and notebooks: A SSD. If it means so much to a user, they can get an Acer or HP ultraportable with one as an add-on, still come out $300 or more ahead and keep it moving with more memory, better graphics processing, a CPU that's actually current.
    You forgot the 13.3" screen and full-sized keyboard that separates the MacBook Air from traditional netbooks.

    It has to use a less powerful processor because it is so thin. But, look at the actual performance of the MacBook Air and not just specs and you will see that it performs well. Of course, it's not a desktop replacement. But, a thin and light laptop that is more useful than a typical netbook.

    iBooks and iAds offer more "flash" (tee hee) to their respective experiences. Not functional improvements.
    Would you watch a movie that's in color on a black and white tv? Why would you want to read a book that has color photos in black and white on a Kindle when the iPad can actually display the color?

    iAds is an improvement over typical ads on mobile devices. It's more than just "flash".

    But cardfan's point is rock solid. Apple copies like everyone else. In my opinion, the difference is that they have been smart enough since the dawn of the iPod to leverage all of their strengths into each new product line with iTunes as the glue tying it together. Other companies like Microsoft or Samsung that have diverse product lines will have a smash or two (e.g. Kinect, Galaxy S, Xbox), but are unaware or unable to leverage it into strengths in other product lines.
    How are they copying? When they brought out the iPod. It had way more space for your music versus what was out at the time. Remember a 1000 songs in your pocket? No one else had MP3 players with that much capacity.

    The iPhone was unlike anything else when it came out in 2007.

    The iPad was unlike anything else when it came out last year.

    Three example where they didn't copy what was already out there.
  17. #97  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    ...But cardfan's point is rock solid. Apple copies like everyone else. In my opinion, the difference is that they have been smart enough since the dawn of the iPod to leverage all of their strengths into each new product line with iTunes as the glue tying it together. Other companies like Microsoft or Samsung that have diverse product lines will have a smash or two (e.g. Kinect, Galaxy S, Xbox), but are unaware or unable to leverage it into strengths in other product lines.

    This is a singular skill that Apple seems to have mastered exclusively. But it does not mean that they only improve and don't copy in a "me too" fashion. They do. It sometimes even takes them several tries to get things right.
    Good point about iTunes. So, the question is, can Apple maintain a proprietary system that forces people to use Apple products to the exclusion of all others.

    They tried it before, and failed miserably (yes, it really did happen, Apple failed - go check out Macintosh Office, the Laser Writer, Appletalk/Appleshare, etc etc.) The plan, back then, was to take the existing strength of their popular Mac/LaserWriter combo in the publishing field, and leverage it into the corporate space.

    It failed. Personally, I think what brought about its downfall quickly was licensing Poscript, which enabled other laser printers to supplant the $7k + LaserWriter. That said, I think it would have eventually failed anyway. People don't like being forced to do everything within a certain broad system. Mac owners, even back then, wanted options for laser printers. Corporate solutions didn't want to have to connect their various computers using one single proprietary protocol (in the case of Appletalk). I think the whole Apple TV idea is going to fail for that very reason, people don't want to be locked into a single vendor.

    If HP manages to create an eco system that works fine with other systems, but works better with theirs, then I believe their system will succeed.

    Of course, it's got to get off to a running start. I think that is what the OP was getting at. Do they do that by offering the newest, (hopefully) hottest device at a steep discount? I don't think that's the way.

    However, I do believe that offering a tablet, even at a premium, then having a phone that uses the same OS, and ties together neatly with the tablet, and is offered at a very inexpensive bundle price could be compelling.

    And yeah, the phone, in that case, would be a loss leader.
  18. #98  
    Quote Originally Posted by SoFly
    You forgot the 13.3" screen and full-sized keyboard that separates the MacBook Air from traditional netbooks.
    First off, it comes in 11.6 and 13-inch sizes, but if you want to base your argument around the 13.3 screen model you're jumping up to $1300, which is enough for a HP DM1z 11-incher, a HP DM4t 14-incher with Core i5 and a 14-inch screen, plus $200 left over.

    [quote] It has to use a less powerful processor because it is so thin. But, look at the actual performance of the MacBook Air and not just specs and you will see that it performs well. Of course, it's not a desktop replacement. But, a thin and light laptop that is more useful than a typical netbook. [/quot]

    Well, it has a solid state hard drive, so what a surprise. It only costs $1000 more, so it's totally worth it.

    Would you watch a movie that's in color on a black and white tv? Why would you want to read a book that has color photos in black and white on a Kindle when the iPad can actually display the color?
    How is a book enhanced by colored text? Wow...some photos and and illustrations may be in color? What a revolutionary advancement.

    iAds is an improvement over typical ads on mobile devices. It's more than just "flash".
    It's not an improvement. Your ads are limited to one platform which will likely never have the reach of the entire mobile web that other platforms serve, and you have a $1 million minimum requirement for buys. The quality of an ad platform is how it serves advertisers, not the people watching the ads. For the people, a non-existent ad is the best possible ad.

    How are they copying? When they brought out the iPod. It had way more space for your music versus what was out at the time. Remember a 1000 songs in your pocket? No one else had MP3 players with that much capacity.

    The iPhone was unlike anything else when it came out in 2007.

    The iPad was unlike anything else when it came out last year.

    Three example where they didn't copy what was already out there.
    No, these are three examples where they copied and also improved upon what was out there. Doing the latter doesn't obviate the former.
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    #99  
    How did this turn into a discussion of macbook air?
  20. #100  
    Quote Originally Posted by bmbriefs View Post
    How did this turn into a discussion of macbook air?
    yeh i got lost and decided not to post
    Gotta stay in the "NO"

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