Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1.    #1  
    HP could really knock the ball out of the park with this one and perhaps attract users of other phone operating systems if this is done right.

    After seeing the demo of how apps are developed using Enyo I started to think that HP could use the cloud for more than just storing media and files. If Enyo apps can run in a browser, why not have the apps there too. (I would still want the apps on my phone for when I am not connected) Basically they could make it so my phone (or tablet) is completely emulated in the cloud.

    This would allow me to run an app on my phone, tablet or pc (using the cloud version). I could even run the same app on an iPad or Android device using the cloud version of the app. Obviously this would be limited to the more simplistic apps that do not have compiled code, but it would be great for getting to your contacts and checking your email from anywhere and it would be a way to attract users of iDevices and Android.
    Last edited by danwendell; 01/25/2011 at 01:29 PM.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    So much for the cloud:

    Verizon Wireless strives to provide customers the best experience when using our network, a shared resource among tens of millions of customers. To help achieve this, if you use an extraordinary amount of data and fall within the top 5% of Verizon Wireless data users we may reduce your data throughput speeds periodically for the remainder of your then current and immediately following billing cycle to ensure high quality network performance for other users at locations and times of peak demand. Our proactive management of the Verizon Wireless network is designed to ensure that the remaining 95% of data customers arenít negatively affected by the inordinate data consumption of just a few users.

    We are implementing optimization and transcoding technologies in our network to transmit data files in a more efficient manner to allow available network capacity to benefit the greatest number of users. These techniques include caching less data, using less capacity, and sizing the video more appropriately for the device. The optimization process is agnostic to the content itself and to the website that provides it. While we invest much effort to avoid changing text, image, and video files in the compression process and while any change to the file is likely to be indiscernible, the optimization process may minimally impact the appearance of the file as displayed on your device. For a further, more detailed explanation of these techniques, please visit www.verizonwireless.com/vzwoptimization.

    What I don't get is Google just announced that they are doing OTA insta's with apps -- something we Palm fans have been talking about (that HP will be doing this) and you and other people continue to believe it's not going to happen. Sorry, it's real, and Google just announced it. Which means HP will have to up anny by doing something new -- hopefully they have something great.

    The cloud is where every company is heading. And yes, gmail, contacts and tons of info is all ready there. But this is the first time a company has made it where you can insta something through the web on another device that your not on. At least, in terms of cell phones.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    My point is that while content companies are offering up more products and services over the cloud, the carriers are starting to institute data caps, speed tiers, and throttling. Verizon is saying that they are going to throttle the top 5% of data users. I don't know how much it takes to get there but there are a ton of data users who just read their email and do a little browsing. I'm just wondering if I really want to keep putting more and more of my content on the cloud so that I have to depend on a carrier to get it.

    Unlimited data is a fantasy. It's only unlimited until enough people want to use it and then it becomes limited.
    My point is going more into the cloud will not nec. mean more data being used. For instance, what is the different then you doing an OTA insta of an App through your Windows/Mac computer then downloading it the old fashion way? Does one way use more data then the other? Of course not.

    Going more into the cloud will not be limited by carriers. Now going completely in the cloud (meaning an OS completely in the cloud and not on a physical device) is a stretch -- but I don't think anyone is actually saying that.
  4. #4  
    The BEST use of cloud manager that I saw was called Audio Galaxy: one client online full time in my "home PC" , and I choosing what has to be downloaded using a website in any place!!

    THIS was a intelligent use to cloud: simple and functional!


    Best Regards...
    "If A Man Isn't Willing To Take Some Risk For His Opinions, Either His Opinions Are No Good Or He's No Good!" - Ezra Pound (Poet & Critic)
    (Happy A Lot, As A Good Carioca!)
  5. davidtm's Avatar
    Posts
    564 Posts
    Global Posts
    784 Global Posts
    #5  
    Good evidence that the USofA is behind many other developed countries in its internet infrastructure capacity. Economic recovery through infrastructure improvements!
    No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by astraith View Post
    My point is going more into the cloud will not nec. mean more data being used. For instance, what is the different then you doing an OTA insta of an App through your Windows/Mac computer then downloading it the old fashion way? Does one way use more data then the other? Of course not.

    Going more into the cloud will not be limited by carriers. Now going completely in the cloud (meaning an OS completely in the cloud and not on a physical device) is a stretch -- but I don't think anyone is actually saying that.
    Huh?

    Unless you're using an aircard on your PC or Mac, you most likely achieve your data connection through a cable/dsl provider. Those guys are much more lax when it comes to data limits.

    When your dealing with mobile devices, your connection is through a cell carrier (sprint, verizon, ATT) these guys are becoming more likely to try to limit how much data we can use on our devices.

    Running apps 'in the cloud' would require a constant data stream (think the Onlive gaming service). Cell Carrier simply wouldn't go for it...

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  7. #7  
    I take NYC subway for more than 40 min on each way everyday. That is the time that I usually play game on my phone. No, I don't need my apps to be store on the cloud. I want it on my device so I can access it with or without internet connection.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    My point is that while content companies are offering up more products and services over the cloud, the carriers are starting to institute data caps, speed tiers, and throttling. Verizon is saying that they are going to throttle the top 5% of data users. I don't know how much it takes to get there but there are a ton of data users who just read their email and do a little browsing. I'm just wondering if I really want to keep putting more and more of my content on the cloud so that I have to depend on a carrier to get it.

    Unlimited data is a fantasy. It's only unlimited until enough people want to use it and then it becomes limited.
    Gizmodo references a study from July that puts people who use more than 2gb a month in that top 5%.

    Link to the study:
    http://www.crn.com/news/client-devic...rHg**.ecappj02

    Gizmodo article:
    http://m.gizmodo.com/5750903/hello-d...-slow-you-down

    <edit>
    Gizmodo updated the article to include information about Verizon's new "optimization" plans... Interesting.

    Sent from my HTC HD2 using Tapatalk
    Want to keep up with my exciting new projects? You know where to find me.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by davidtm View Post
    Good evidence that the USofA is behind many other developed countries in its internet infrastructure capacity. Economic recovery through infrastructure improvements!
    That is so true.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    Huh?

    Unless you're using an aircard on your PC or Mac, you most likely achieve your data connection through a cable/dsl provider. Those guys are much more lax when it comes to data limits.

    When your dealing with mobile devices, your connection is through a cell carrier (sprint, verizon, ATT) these guys are becoming more likely to try to limit how much data we can use on our devices.

    Running apps 'in the cloud' would require a constant data stream (think the Onlive gaming service). Cell Carrier simply wouldn't go for it...

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Running apps through the cloud, yes, but that is not what I said. I said install (sorry, I say insta which equals install -- i use that lingo in comcast billing system) over the air -- or OTA. What does that mean? When you purchase an app through your web browser -- the software that people use to get on the web -- on your PC or Mac, it will automatically download and install on your phone and/or tablet. Just go and read what Google announced yesturday. Then you will see.

    So no, that does not use more data on your cell phone then it does now. Unless we can't download apps on an iPhone or Android. Can you do that? Does that use too much data? It's the same thing, but easier since more people are going to have tablets and smart phones soon. You wouldn't HAVE to install and download apps on each device. And it is being "in the cloud" because you use the cloud to send the data to your mobile device.

    And if you don't believe me here is the link. http://www.engadget.com/2011/02/03/w...-the-xoom-and/

    The video above also runs you through the big news of the day, namely that Android Market can now be accessed via a dedicated website and apps downloaded to your device remotely
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by astraith View Post
    That is so true.



    Running apps through the cloud, yes, but that is not what I said. I said install (sorry, I say insta which equals install -- i use that lingo in comcast billing system) over the air -- or OTA. What does that mean? When you purchase an app through your web browser -- the software that people use to get on the web -- on your PC or Mac, it will automatically download and install on your phone and/or tablet. Just go and read what Google announced yesturday. Then you will see.

    So no, that does not use more data on your cell phone then it does now. Unless we can't download apps on an iPhone or Android. Can you do that? Does that use too much data? It's the same thing, but easier since more people are going to have tablets and smart phones soon. You wouldn't HAVE to install and download apps on each device. And it is being "in the cloud" because you use the cloud to send the data to your mobile device.

    And if you don't believe me here is the link. Watch Google's Android event in full: Honeycomb on the Xoom, Android Market website, in-app purchases, and Cee-Lo Green -- Engadget

    oh see what you're saying. That feature is neat, but really has nothing to do with storing anything in the cloud... other than your purchase info, which is stored in the cloud on all platforms...

    for the record, every time you buy an app from the app catalog, its an OTA install. That term has nothing to do with whether or not the process originated from the device that app is being installed on.

    i was referring to this comment from the OP


    Quote Originally Posted by danwendell View Post
    Basically they could make it so my phone (or tablet) is completely emulated in the cloud.

    This would allow me to run an app on my phone, tablet or pc (using the cloud version). I could even run the same app on an iPad or Android device using the cloud version of the app.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    oh see what you're saying. That feature is neat, but really has nothing to do with storing anything in the cloud... other than your purchase info, which is stored in the cloud on all platforms...

    for the record, every time you buy an app from the app catalog, its an OTA install. That term has nothing to do with whether or not the process originated from the device that app is being installed on.

    i was referring to this comment from the OP
    Yep, that is true that it is not "using" the cloud for storage but to send info from one device to another. What makes it even more neat is if you loose your netbook, tablet or phone your info is automatically synced when you sign on or tell it to sync. Just watch the video I provided in my post you quoted. It's very, very cool what Google has done. And I believe EVERY company is moving towards this and sadly, if HP doesn't go even more into the cloud and have SOME sort of killer feature then things could not end up well for HP. They need something amazing.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by astraith View Post
    Yep, that is true that it is not "using" the cloud for storage but to send info from one device to another. What makes it even more neat is if you loose your netbook, tablet or phone your info is automatically synced when you sign on or tell it to sync. Just watch the video I provided in my post you quoted. It's very, very cool what Google has done. And I believe EVERY company is moving towards this and sadly, if HP doesn't go even more into the cloud and have SOME sort of killer feature then things could not end up well for HP. They need something amazing.
    as far as buying apps from the PC, for whatever reason, I wasn't REALLY impressed or surprised when I saw this in the Honeycomb demonstration. I was more surprised that we haven't seen this already. The system has already been in place on WebOS. I can already browse the Palm catalog from the browser, and even send my phone a link to that app. A couple taps later, it's installed.

    As far as our phones being automatically sync'd if we get a new device, our Pre's have had that feature since day one. I'm on my 4th or 5th pre... And my contacts and apps returned automatically each time. I'm not really impressed to see that from google.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    as far as buying apps from the PC, for whatever reason, I wasn't REALLY impressed or surprised when I saw this in the Honeycomb demonstration. I was more surprised that we haven't seen this already. The system has already been in place on WebOS. I can already browse the Palm catalog from the browser, and even send my phone a link to that app. A couple taps later, it's installed.

    As far as our phones being automatically sync'd if we get a new device, our Pre's have had that feature since day one. I'm on my 4th or 5th pre... And my contacts and apps returned automatically each time. I'm not really impressed to see that from google.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    But are your app's automatically installed when you get a new Pre? I knew about the contacts. Sending a link your phone and it automatically being installed (and on your tablets, too) are two different things.

    But I was impressed, and I think HP will be doing these type of things. I alos think Apple will be doing things like this too.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by astraith View Post
    But are your app's automatically installed when you get a new Pre? I knew about the contacts. Sending a link your phone and it automatically being installed (and on your tablets, too) are two different things.

    But I was impressed, and I think HP will be doing these type of things. I alos think Apple will be doing things like this too.
    yes my apps are automatically installed when i get a new pre...

    and i agree sending a link isn't the same, i'm more frustrated that palm hasn't yet taken the next logical step, than I am impressed with google in this regard.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    yes my apps are automatically installed when i get a new pre...

    and i agree sending a link isn't the same, i'm more frustrated that palm hasn't yet taken the next logical step, than I am impressed with google in this regard.
    Palm hasn't had time to take the next logical step. With HP buyout, I think that slowed some of the evolution of WebOS 2.0. I think Feb. 9th will see them do this.

    And thats cool. I didn't know that!
  16. #16  
    Have you all seen the Amazon Cloud deal today? Evidently you can play all your music and access files from your Android device too.... Wonder if anything HP is going to offer will set it apart from this....

Posting Permissions